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The Coronation Chair and Stone of Scone: History, Archaeology and Conservation (Westminster Abbey Occasional Papers) Hardcover – 2 Jun 2013

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Oxbow Books (2 Jun. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1782971521
  • ISBN-13: 978-1782971528
  • Product Dimensions: 22.1 x 2.5 x 27.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,002,519 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

"The word definitive is often used casually to suggest the serious intent of a book; only occasionally does a book warrant the correct meaning of being the most authoritative account available. This book, with all its forensic detail, is unquestionably definitive; it achieves this whilst also being excellently written, beautifully illustrated and having a powerful narrative."--John Schofield"Transactions of the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society" (01/01/2014)"

"Warwick Rodwell's book is a worthy - and enjoyable - record of its creation and vicissitudes. Perhaps the time will come when the futile and ignorant political gesture which split Chair from Stone can be reversed. In the meantime this authoritative account is unlikely to be superseded."--Simon Swynfen Jervis"Furniture History" (01/01/2014)

"Perhaps the defining image from the television age's dawn is Princess Elizabeth's crowning in Westminster Abbey on June 2 1953. By then the Coronation Chair was decidedly tatty, but in the middle ages it had glowed with gilding, painting and coloured glass... Now, newly conserved - and thanks to this magisterial book understood - a new history for the chair opens up. Scholarly and fascinating."--Paul Stamper "British Archaeology Review, 133, November 2013 "

"The word 'definitive' is often used casually to suggest the serious intent of a book; only occasionally does a book warrant the correct meaning of being the most authoritative account available. This book, with all its forensic detail, is unquestionably 'definitive'; it achieves this whilst also being excellently written, beautifully illustrated and having a powerful narrative."--John Schofield"Transactions of the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society" (01/01/2014)

-Perhaps the defining image from the television age's dawn is Princess Elizabeth's crowning in Westminster Abbey on June 2 1953. By then the Coronation Chair was decidedly tatty, but in the middle ages it had glowed with gilding, painting and coloured glass... Now, newly conserved - and thanks to this magisterial book understood - a new history for the chair opens up. Scholarly and fascinating.---Paul Stamper -British Archaeology Review, 133, November 2013 -

-The word 'definitive' is often used casually to suggest the serious intent of a book; only occasionally does a book warrant the correct meaning of being the most authoritative account available. This book, with all its forensic detail, is unquestionably 'definitive'; it achieves this whilst also being excellently written, beautifully illustrated and having a powerful narrative.---John Schofield-Transactions of the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society- (01/01/2014)

-Warwick Rodwell's book is a worthy - and enjoyable - record of its creation and vicissitudes. Perhaps the time will come when the futile and ignorant political gesture which split Chair from Stone can be reversed. In the meantime this authoritative account is unlikely to be superseded.---Simon Swynfen Jervis-Furniture History- (01/01/2014)

'The oldest dated piece of English furniture (1297-1300) made by a known artist (Walter of Durham) to survive has been given the comprehensive study it deserves by Warwick Rodwell, with supplementary chapters on its most recent conservation by Marie Louise Sauerberg and its current display by Ptolemy Dean.'--James Yorke"The Spectator" (08/01/2013)

It is authoritative, and magnificently illustrated. It is, moreover, like any good detective story, a damned good read, as the authors steer us ably through the archaeological investigations of the Chair and the Stone, interpret the medieval and modern documentation, and dispose of 'mountains of myth'. There can be few national symbols that have been so well served by a publication.--John Clark "The Ricardian, XXIV (2014) "

About the Author

Professor Warwick Rodwell, OBE, is Consultant Archaeologist to Westminster Abbey.

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Excellent book, very good service.
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