Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £14.81

Save £7.14 (33%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist (MIT Press) by [Koch, Christof]
Kindle App Ad

Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist (MIT Press) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£14.81

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

"Koch weaves a vivid and poignant story, punctuated by fascinating characters and compelling science. The book will leave you with a small piece of Koch's own consciousness, plucked from his head and delivered into yours." -- "Science News"

"Pioneering consciousness studies requires a nimbly multiprocessing mind. That Koch possesses one is apparent."- "Chronicle of Higher Education"

."..[D]efinitely worth reading...I argued with Koch all the way through this book. And I loved every minute of it." -- Robert Stickgold, "Nature"

"Among the plethora of books on consciousness, this engaging blend of science, autobiography and honest self-reflection stands out. It combines a lucid description of the leading edge of consciousness science with a surprisingly personal and philosophical reflection of the author's life as one of its foremost authorities, shedding light on how scientists really think. Science writing at its best."-Anil Seth, "Times Higher Education"

."..[T]he book offers good rides through the wild forest of the neuroscience of consciousness. Koch is fearless, and does not shrink from talking about phenomenology and qualia; he includes them and tries to formalise consciousness by linking it to direct brain signals or well-defined psychological constructs."--Tristan Bekinschtein, "TimesHigher Education"

"[D]efinitely worth readingI argued with Koch all the way through this book. And I loved every minute of it." -- Robert Stickgold, "Nature"

"[T]he book offers good rides through the wild forest of the neuroscience of consciousness. Koch is fearless, and does not shrink from talking about phenomenology and qualia; he includes them and tries to formalise consciousness by linking it to direct brain signals or well-defined psychological constructs."--Tristan Bekinschtein, "TimesHigher Education"

"This new volume is attractive not only for the breadth and depth that is typical of Koch's writing, but also for its highly accessible nature...This important book serves as a subtle introduction to many of the driving questions of the discipline that may well significantly change people's understanding of human nature." -- H. Storl, "Choice"

... [D]efinitely worth reading.... I argued with Koch all the way through this book. And I loved every minute of it.--Robert Stickgold "Nature "

Among the plethora of books on consciousness, this engaging blend of science, autobiography and honest self-reflection stands out. It combines a lucid description of the leading edge of consciousness science with a surprisingly personal and philosophical reflection of the author's life as one of its foremost authorities, shedding light on how scientists really think. Science writing at its best.--Anil Seth "Times Higher Education "

... [T]he book offers good rides through the wild forest of the neuroscience of consciousness. Koch is fearless, and does not shrink from talking about phenomenology and qualia; he includes them and tries to formalise consciousness by linking it to direct brain signals or well-defined psychological constructs.--Tristan Bekinschtein "TimesHigher Education ""

... [D]efinitely worth reading.... I argued with Koch all the way through this book. And I loved every minute of it.

--Robert Stickgold "Nature "

Among the plethora of books on consciousness, this engaging blend of science, autobiography and honest self-reflection stands out. It combines a lucid description of the leading edge of consciousness science with a surprisingly personal and philosophical reflection of the author's life as one of its foremost authorities, shedding light on how scientists really think. Science writing at its best.

--Anil Seth "Times Higher Education "

... [T]he book offers good rides through the wild forest of the neuroscience of consciousness. Koch is fearless, and does not shrink from talking about phenomenology and qualia; he includes them and tries to formalise consciousness by linking it to direct brain signals or well-defined psychological constructs.

--Tristan Bekinschtein "TimesHigher Education ""

About the Author

Christof Koch is Professor of Biology and of Engineering at the California Institute of Technology and Chief Scientific Officer of the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle. He is the author of The Quest for Consciousness and other books.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 589 KB
  • Print Length: 195 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; 1 edition (9 Mar. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007D58OM6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #89,980 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book would be ideal for someone looking for a light, up to date introduction to one the most intriguing and fascinating mysteries that remains unsolved. He is quite honest and frank at times as he discusses his personal life. Koch takes a strong scientific approach to the problem of consciousness and it's clear he doesn't have much time for philosophers with their millennia of armchair arguments. Despite that he discusses the important philosophical issues with a refreshing directness. The book discusses several contemporary experimental advances on the cutting edge of brain research.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist is a well written and accessible presentation of the cutting edge of neuroscience in the context of the challenges of consciousness studies and philosophy of mind. It's an engaging mix of rigorous science and personal overview (I think that the criticisms of the autobiographical content are misplaced - this content is actually quite small and yet helpful in pushing the narrative along in an informative and accessible manner.)

My only niggles are as follows: In a superb chapter about free will and the brain, Koch appears to demonstrate how the universe is ultimately unpredictable (indeterminate.) At the same time he shows us that independent conscious agency is just about incomprehensible. Action, we are shown, precedes conscious decision. We are informed that "the feeling of agency is no more responsible for the actual decision than thunder is for the lightening stroke." Yet in the closing paragraphs of this chapter Koch mysteriously announces that he has adopted a compatibilist conception of free will - free will and determinism are compatible - the inverse of what he actually seems to have demonstrated; the compatibility of indeterminism and the absence of free will.

Another point concerns the fabled 'hard problem of consciousness'. Koch warns us to not be "taken in" by philosophical claims that the hard problem may remain with us. Yet there is nothing here that brings us closer to resolving the explanatory gap. Even if it can be demonstrated that consciousness arises from integrated systems that employ a large repertoire of highly differentiated states (for instance), we are no closer to understanding how/why raw subjective feels (qualia) fit into the picture.

Don't let these niggles put you off, this is a wise and informative addition to consciousness literature.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
"Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist" by Christof Kock reviews current research and philosophy on the neural basis of consciousness from a personal perspective. The book covers a wide variety of topics in a slim volume and avoids technical debate about the scientific and philosophical issues surrounding the subject of consciousness. So, it does not get bogged down in technical points. It also interweaves personal details from the author's life into the narrative, which adds a personal touch to the debate and adds to the overall legibility of the book.

This book, like most of Dr. Kock's previous work, is superbly written and highly readable for those with a basic undergraduate knowledge of neuroscience. It is directed at a larger audience than the professional neuroscience community but it is certainly more meaningful to readers with a basic knowledge of the field. It is not meant as academic review but, as a neuroscience professional myself, I found it to be useful guide to current thinking in the field. I think the book is accessible to a wider audience than the neuroscience community but it is impossible to explain every detail of this complex topic in a limited space. So, general readers might want to consult Wikipedia or some other basic test for any unfamiliar concepts.

I know Dr. Kock personally and have enormous respect for his work and scientific writing. When I was a psychology undergraduate at McGill University, my instructor for Introductory Psychology, Donald Hebb (as in Hebbian synapse) proclaimed in his first lecture that consciousness was interesting but much too complex a subject for experimental psychologists and, therefore, was best avoided. This attitude persisted in the field until relativel recently. Dr.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dear Mr Koch
I have just this moment finished your book and wanted to convey to you my deep gratitude for the considerable effort and courage it must have taken to write. We will never meet but you have moved me. I suspect that from now on I will also describe myself as a romantic reductionist. I also suspect that there are many, many others out there who will come to do the same. We believe in the power and majesty of objective science, but we also live in a subjective realm that is equally majestic, equally powerful and equally wonderful. As 'the arc of your life traces its inevitable decline' (p9) you have tried to bring these two realms together and to do justice to each. And you have succeeded. Thank you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover