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Conflicts Paperback – 2 Apr 2010

4.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Paperback, 2 Apr 2010
£14.16
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: NewCon Press (2 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907069119
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907069116
  • Package Dimensions: 20.8 x 14.6 x 2.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,657,732 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

From the Publisher

The hardback edition is limited to just 150 numbered copies, each signed by all the contributors -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Paperback.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Just finished this and really enjoyed it. Some great British science fiction stories based around war, some uplifting, some quite depressing. I bought it becuase of the Neal Asher story, which was good, but not the best in the collection IMO. "Our Land" by Chris Beckett was my favourite, but "Harmony in my Head" by Rosanne Rabinowitz came a close second. I shall be looking out for more by these authors.
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Format: Paperback
Conflicts is an anthology of short fiction based in and around military conflicts. There are some good stories here, particularly by Una McCormack, Chris Beckett and Keith Brooke. That's not to say that Eric Brown, Neal Asher, Gareth L Powell and others don't turn in acceptable stories because they do. It's a good solid read and only missed out on a five star rating because there were no standout, slap you in the face, amazingly fantastic, jaw-dropping stories.

Well worth the price.
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Format: Paperback
As Mr. Whates says in his introduction, Conflicts is "defiantly SF... with a space ship on the front" and everything. Although that's the ostensible limit to the book's rebellion, the selection of stories showcases well-written science fiction's power to encapsulate big ideas in small spaces.

Conflicts does begin with a fairly traditional war story, that is, if anything by Andy Remic could be called traditional. "Psi.Copath" is one of Mr. Remic's Combat K adventures, following a group of hard-shooting, hard-swearing hard men (and women) as they explode things across the universe. There's wise-cracking, general skullduggery and some inventive cursing.

Michael Cobley's "The Marker's Mark" has all the hallmarks of Golden Age SF - silly alien names, warring one-note villains, ill-defined omnipotent technology and a fortune cookie ending. That said, it is also a strong examination of the potency of monopoly and the power of greed.

Keith Brooke's "Sussed" follows Chan, a far future coder who works for a notorious crime lord, Geno. At the start of the story, he's fleeing his employer. Chan's been caught in flagrante with his boss' sister and knows he's in serious trouble. Even as Chan gets further and further away from Earth (and develops many new and interesting problems), his focus is always on his homeland.

Neal Asher's "The Cuisinart Effect" sees a hard-nosed officer leads a group of soldiers into the distant past in order to foil their enemy's plot to kidnap dinosaurs and use them as weapons of mass destruction. I'm not familiar with Mr. Asher's other work, but got the impression that this was linked into an existing world. I'm sure I missed a few nuances because of that, but, whatever. Dinosaurs.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book
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