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Confessor (Sword of Truth (Hardcover)) Hardcover – 22 Apr 2008

2.9 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 603 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (22 April 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765315238
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765315236
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 3.3 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 998,323 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

" Makes an indelible impact." -- "Publishers Weekly" on "Faith of the Fallen"

" Few writers have Goodkind' s power of creation... a phenomenal piece of imaginative writing, exhaustive in its scope and riveting in its detail." -- "Publishing News" on "Temple"" of the Winds"

" Highly recommended." -- "San Diego"" Union Tribune" on "Temple"" of the Winds"

" Goodkind' s greatest triumph: the ability to introduce immediately identifiable characters. His heroes, like us, are not perfect. Instead, each is flawed in ways that strengthen, rather than weaken their impact. You' ll find no two-dimensional oafs here. In fact, at times you' ll think you' re looking at your own reflection." -- "SFX" on "Blood of the Fold"

" Makes an indelible impact. " -- Publishers Weekly on Faith of the Fallen
& nbsp;
" Few writers have Goodkind ' s power of creation ... a phenomenal piece of imaginative writing, exhaustive in its scope and riveting in its detail. " -- Publishing News on Temple of the Winds
& nbsp;
" Highly recommended. " -- San Diego Union Tribune on Temple of the Winds
& nbsp;
" Goodkind ' s greatest triumph: the ability to introduce immediately identifiable characters. His heroes, like us, are not perfect. Instead, each is flawed in ways that strengthen, rather than weaken their impact. You ' ll find no two-dimensional oafs here. In fact, at times you ' ll think you ' re looking at your own reflection. " -- SFX on Blood of the Fold

"Makes an indelible impact." -"Publishers Weekly" on "Faith of the Fallen"
"Few writers have Goodkind's power of creation...a phenomenal piece of imaginative writing, exhaustive in its scope and riveting in its detail." -"Publishing News" on "Temple"" of the Winds"
"Highly recommended." -"San Diego"" Union Tribune" on "Temple"" of the Winds"
"Goodkind's greatest triumph: the ability to introduce immediately identifiable characters. His heroes, like us, are not perfect. Instead, each is flawed in ways that strengthen, rather than weaken their impact. You'll find no two-dimensional oafs here. In fact, at times you'll think you're looking at your own reflection." -"SFX" on "Blood of the Fold"

"Makes an indelible impact." --"Publishers Weekly" on "Faith of the Fallen"
"Few writers have Goodkind's power of creation a phenomenal piece of imaginative writing, exhaustive in its scope and riveting in its detail." --"Publishing News" on "Temple"" of the Winds"
"Highly recommended." --"San Diego"" Union Tribune" on "Temple"" of the Winds"
"Goodkind's greatest triumph: the ability to introduce immediately identifiable characters. His heroes, like us, are not perfect. Instead, each is flawed in ways that strengthen, rather than weaken their impact. You'll find no two-dimensional oafs here. In fact, at times you'll think you're looking at your own reflection." --"SFX" on "Blood of the Fold""

Makes an indelible impact. "Publishers Weekly on Faith of the Fallen"

Few writers have Goodkind's power of creation a phenomenal piece of imaginative writing, exhaustive in its scope and riveting in its detail. "Publishing News on Temple of the Winds"

Highly recommended. "San Diego Union Tribune on Temple of the Winds"

Goodkind's greatest triumph: the ability to introduce immediately identifiable characters. His heroes, like us, are not perfect. Instead, each is flawed in ways that strengthen, rather than weaken their impact. You'll find no two-dimensional oafs here. In fact, at times you'll think you're looking at your own reflection. "SFX on Blood of the Fold""

Book Description

The International Bestseller

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Well, from an overall perspective this series really has taken a long and winding route. What started with a spellbinding Wizard's First Rule has at last wound its way to the end. The reason I'm on here reviewing Confessor is because I picked up WFR some 8 years ago - was utterly enchanted from the off and that's how my love affair with the story started. The first 3 books were almost virtually flawless, creating such a wonderful range of vivid characters and settings. Very unfortunately, for some reason books 5(Soul of the Fire) through to 11(Confessor) seem to have gone on a gradual decline.

Although I agree with what Goodkind preaches as it were; nobility, rationality of mind, love, etc, he has taken it too far in as much as he seems to keep reiterating the same things over and over. On reflection perhaps Goodkind will realise that at the least he should have focused on Richard and Kahlan et all acting out their wholesome and inspiring lives as the demonstration of their (and Goodkind's) decent values. Just trotting them out at every chance eventually left me a little worn out.

In particular reference to this final installment, these are my feelings;

Part of Goodkind's style is to present good and bad in their extremes. Any guy would want to be Richard and any woman would want to be married to him. Vice versa for Kahlan (or Nicci, since her conversion). Goodkind positively showers these characters with divine attributes to the extent that I have been inspired by them. In exactly the opposite way, Jagang, the Order, Six and the rest are shown to be the most savage, perverse brutes imaginable. What really did get to me in this last book is that for what seemed like the first half of the book (about 300 pages) the topic seemed to be entirely on sex/rape/debauchery.
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Format: Hardcover
I think some of the reviews are overly harsh on this. Yes the series has tended to sermonise too much over recent books and yes much of the dialouge between Richard and Kahlan makes me want to stick my fingers down my throat but, if you have read the rest of the series, then Confessor does a decent job of tying up the loose ends and the ending, whilst way too short (almost as if TG was hitting a word limit) was imaginative and unexpected. In general, it would have helped if this series stopped at 7 books and more got packed in but I would contend that this book is probably the best of the last 4, although nowhere near the standard of the first 5. If you have stuck with it for the first 9 books then there is no reason not buy this - although the paperback will be better value!
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Format: Hardcover
I loved Wizard's First Rule. Everything about the novel, from plot to characterisation to the world it was set in, was excellent and I was excited when I found out the series was going to be a long one.

I'm not excited anymore.

As other reader's have commented, after about the first four or so books, Goodkind might as well have put down his pen and stepped away from his keyboard. In fact, we might have been better off if he had done. Because the downward spiralling arc from Faith of the Fallen to Confessor is a truly tragic one and it actually pains me to see the potential of Goodkind's series squandered so badly.

With the introduction of the final trilogy of the series, (beginning with Chainfire), I thought there might still be some hope left to bring everything to a satisfactory conclusion.

I was wrong.

Confessor is not, by any standards, a good read. It's preachy, word-heavy and seems to carelessly disregard relationships and plotlines that emerged from the previous ten books (Zedd/Adie relationship anyone ...?) If the characters had discussed Richard and Kahlan's doomed romance one more time in the opening chapters, I think I would have screamed.

But perhaps the one problem that irritated me the most was this: the premise of the whole series was that Richard is a War Wizard who is going to save the world from Jagang with his wizardy abilities, yes? Well, no not really. Because somehow in the space of eleven novels, Richard never finds the time to learn how to use his abilities. At all. (He's too busy rescuing Kahlan from distress, getting beaten up, rescuing Kahlan again, getting captured, oh and for a bit of variety - rescuing Kahlan.
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Format: Hardcover
First off this book is a brilliant accomplishment and a fitting end to one of the finest series in the fantasy genre. I confess to crying like a girl at the emotional climax and read through the entire book in one sitting. I won't discuss the end, other than saying it leaves plenty of potential for future stories. There are moments that make you want to leap for joy or slump in horror, which is more than can be said for most of the competition or indeed many of the great works of classical fiction.

In many ways, this book is a coming full circle, back to the original themes of Wizard's first rule, which although it perhaps makes its originality questionable, works very well in general.

Having said that the book does suffer from a few problems. For example, Mr Goodkind continues to fail to camouflage his philosophy and there are several points in the novel, where characters speak for long periods of time without interruption in a fairly interchangable way. This is a shame, because it reduces the uniqueness of each character and because we have heard pretty much all of it before, especially in Faith of the Fallen. In retrospect, it would have been better to have kept such points just to the very end, where their impact would have been much greater. I should point out here that I subscribe to his philosophy but I feel the way it was presented in this book, actually detracted from the novel's quality.

The "seen it done it" syndrome is also true of the Emperor's treatment of the female characters, which had been well established in the previous books and perhaps didn't need to be repeated in this book.
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