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on 23 June 2015
This is an easy to read autobiographical account of a confessing EHM, who feels the pangs of guilt for his work in expanding America’s global empire over the past few decades, at the expense of developing countries’ poor people and environments. It covers many important political situations, where the author often had a hands-on role. From Saudi Arabia and the Oil Crisis of the 1970s to Iraq and the recent wars fought there. From Panama and its loss of leaders and the controversy of its canal, to Colombia and Ecuador, with their internal problems. John Perkins is very critical of the often heartless role he had to play in creating opportunities for big US business. He has led a very fascinating life and it’s interesting to see directly how power politics and people of influence are directed by the interests of big US corporations. We see a man who struggles with guilt and who ultimately revokes this powerful lifestyle, to retire to championing the plights of indigenous people through non-profit organisations. It’s an important firsthand account of a critical era of US expansion across the globe. Whatever your views on America’s imperial tendencies, this is an enlightening read which will broaden your horizons. https://wezgbooks.wordpress.com/2013/10/06/review-confessions-of-an-economic-hitman/
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on 29 August 2016
For me this is proved to be an interesting good read. I had heard about this stuff he wrote about over the years from people I know or did know. and thought oh yah right.... Being an older person I remember reading buried in newspaper some of the things he talked about. What he writes is very true. I do know people talk about this but are put down as nut jobs by governments. I suggest you read the book and form your own opinion but I can say after reading this book even if you do not believe it you will start to question some things that government and big business say.
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on 30 January 2012
This book makes me think of the analagy of there being nothing worse than a reformed smoker, to preach about the perils of inhaling.
Perkins falls into this category very well and at times I found his confessional style more than a little hypocritical.
I also agree with other reviewers who note that it is hard to distinguish between fact and fiction in his recollections, of his very charmed life, which he does his best to dress up as some sort of hair shirt experience.
Mea Culpa boo hoo my heart bleeds for you !!
Having said that I did find this an interesting read and have no doubt that much of what he alludes to is based upon well known govermental "foreign policy" practices, a stark reminder of the world we live in today.
It is as direct result of actions by Perkins and his ilk that the protesters on both sides of the Atlantic e.g (anti Wall St and City Banker bashers) are trying to change in their own direct way.
Perkins has chosen to write a confessional and continue to add to his no doubt considerable assets - perhaps in a bid to clense his soul, whilst still managing to polish both his halo & ego ??.
Definitely worth a read but I am not sure that it will actually change the world he appears to have helped create.

So all we can conclude is that history tells us that when The King is dead, we proclaim long live the KIng or should it be Here comes the new boss - same as the old boss ...... Discuss.
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on 26 July 2016
My line of work has seen me interact heavily with themes John talks about, albeit not directly as an EHM or individual representing big corporations.

That said, I have been heavily involved in the non-profit world globally - including in the Amazon, Israel and Palestine on the African continent and in far east Asia, I have had meetings and gained insights from some of the biggest political families, attended govt-to-govt meetings, survived the 2013 egyptian coup and got insights into the continental reach and inner workings of multi-nationals, all the while keeping informed and diverse networks as a result.

There is nothing I've seen to suggest that this book isn't extremely authentic but also incredibly honest with it's portrayal of the way the world works. The only difference being now is that water is known more publicly as being the world's most important resource and that we are not managing what we have well enough or strictly enough. Other resources that we need to be aware of are materials that go into tech - like lithium (batteries) and Coltan (most tech devices) - found in the DRC and then those natural and fast growing resources whose properties have far greater significance than we allow them, like hemp.
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on 9 September 2015
Amazing book...reads like a James Bond, and it is all real!
I never understood the Oliver North story and all the dictators in South America and how they all got there...this book is short and easy to read and reveals so much that is so shocking and unbelievable at first. The facts are clearly presented and his guilt prompted him to confess what he did and reveal the dirty politics in his country, I can understand more clearly why some countries in South America and Middle East have deep distrust in the USA.
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on 19 May 2017
Great book that everyone should read personally I think they should add this to the school curriculum.
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on 28 July 2013
An incredible read that I thoroughly enjoyed. I'm not American so a lot of the concepts in this book were new to me and it served its purposes for beginners (that's not to say that its a book which only beginners can enjoy). John makes the link between his employment with the Ministry of Defence and America's new spin on global imperialism, which are a lot more linked than I realised. I also like the fact that he admits he himself was propagating the problem and is at least honest about some of the bad things he did towards this end (probably not all though, eh?)
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on 18 October 2013
I read this book pretty quickly. Although I am very far removed from the world of U.S. government project, the author's claims seem plausible. If you are a flag-waving patriot who accepts that what the U.S. does is good, because the U.S. does it, you will undoubtedly dislike this book. The author essentially points out the manner by which Americans (most unknowingly) maintain high standards of living: in part, by sabotaging other countries' infrastructure.
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VINE VOICEon 6 December 2013
The advice I was given by my niece's husband,but he could not find the book in his house,so I downloaded to the kindle and kept it for a plane journey,it was a very interesting book,true story of a young graduate,unwittingly recruited to the peace corps by the father of a girlfriend,the father was a fixer in the CIA,the peacecorps was the 'apprenticeship' for the CIA.How the USA demolish countries so they can 'rebuild'them in their likeness,A REAL good read.
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on 14 March 2014
Someone recommended this to me and they were right, this is a really good book that changes your viewpoint. After reading you begin to read through the media, to see what is created news to fit someones agenda and what is actual news. Some of the events described are pretty shocking and it certainly explains certain events that I could never work out such as why the US decided to "help" Panama. I have given it to my teenage son and told him to read it as I believe the lid it lifts on this subject is pretty important. Other people have asked to borrow it. A must buy.
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