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Concurrency in C# Cookbook: Asynchronous, Parallel, and Multithreaded Programming by [Cleary, Stephen]
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Concurrency in C# Cookbook: Asynchronous, Parallel, and Multithreaded Programming 1st , Kindle Edition

3.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product description

Book Description

Asynchronous, Parallel, and Multithreaded Programming

About the Author

Stephen Cleary is a Christian, husband, father, and developer who makes his home in beautiful Northern Michigan. He enjoys speaking and writing, but at the end of the day he enjoys being just a regular developer. Since joining the professional ranks in 1998, Steve has acquired a great deal of experience, ranging from ARM firmware to Azure. He has contributed to open source from the very beginning, starting with the Boost C++ libraries and releasing several libraries and utilities of his own.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 557 KB
  • Print Length: 208 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (15 May 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00KCY2CB4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #311,515 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Top customer reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Maybe my expectations were wrong, but I felt that this book was of very little use.

I'n an experienced C# developer, but used to using background workers, and wanted to get up to speed on the new async / await stuff. I read Cleary's blog many times, but was still not clear. Seeing this book advertised on his blog, and being impressed with what he wrote there, I thought this book might fill in what I was missing.

The book seems to assume you already have a good understanding of many of the issues involved, as it gives only cursory explanations of the background and basics, but by contrast includes recipes for really basic things like using .WaitAny() and so on. Even with my limited understanding of the subject, I had worked out how to use those. The most confusing thing (for me at least) in this whole area is how it all fits together, which was totally missing from this book. All of the code shown was in small, isolated snippets, with no discussion of the bigger picture.

Finally, he spent a significant amount of this slim book on recipes for things like Rx, data flows, meshes and the like, with absolutely no explanation as to what these are or why I might want to use them. This was a complete waste of time as far as I was concerned.

Shame, as I'm still looking for a book to explain this stuff to me. If you don't already understand it, this book won't help. If you do, this book won't tell you anything you don't already know.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Because I needed to know how/where to begin to start developing multi-threaded applications in C#, I decided to buy this book because it came highly recommended..

The book mentions ASYNC TASK etc… (page 16) but sadly I’m developing apps using c# 4.0 and vs2010. I’m sad because from what I’ve read on the web, the features that the book mentions are CTP (that’s Community Technology Preview) code and thus is not fit for use in production code.

"ASYNC" is available for preview / is beta code only in VS2010 but is fully supported in Vs2012 and above…

For now, I've no intention of upgrading my project to VS2012 and above but other than that a good read with code examples throughout.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Useful, but felt it was mostly a user guide to his nuget package
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By E. L. Wisty TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 July 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Whilst writing parallel and asynchronous code has become easier than ever since .NET 4.0 and 4.5, it can still be perplexing and full of pitfalls. Stephen Cleary has written an excellent cookbook covering many scenarios of usage of asynchronous code using async/await and the TAP, and parallel code using the TPL, Dataflow & PLINQ, as well as Rx. Not necessarily a beginner's guide by any means, but an indispensable aid once having progressed beyong some of the basics.

It's also worth reading the author's blog on concurrency, probably the best communicator on the subject around.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Techy books are generally quite dry, but I've enjoyed reading this one. It tackles a thorny topic very well. Highly recommended.
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