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Computer Networks Paperback – 1 Jun 1995

4.3 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 848 pages
  • Publisher: Pearson; 3 edition (1 Jun. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0133942481
  • ISBN-13: 978-0133942484
  • Product Dimensions: 17.7 x 3 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,113,807 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Amazon Review

Now in its third edition, Professor Andrew Tanenbaum's 800-page book is the classic treatise on computer networking. Since its inception, Computer Networks has been the all-time best-selling overview of computer networks by one of the key computer science authors. It's a complete guide to computer networking, covering everything from LANs to satellite networks. The seven-layer OSI model underpins all modern networking technologies and this standard work from the award-winning Professor Tanenbaum devotes most of its chapters to in-depth descriptions of each layer. Protocols, network architecture and software are examined in detail, from the physical layer, through the data link, network, transport, session and presentation layers to the application layer. This book dissects very difficult material with ease.

But Computer Networks isn't without its faults--an eternity in Internet time has elapsed since publication and the book is a little stale as a result. It's also very much a textbook and its layout looks very dated and scholarly--for example, each chapter concludes with a mass of sample questions.

Oft found in countless bibliographies and on the recommended reading list for IT and networking students, Computer Networks is nevertheless an excellent textbook and a good reference book. It's also one of the best-written and easy to read technical books around. For the IT student and networking professionals alike, it's probably essential reading. If you can afford only one networking book, this is the one you should get. --Roger Gann

From the Back Cover

Computer Networks is the ideal introduction to today's and tomorrow's networks. This classic best-seller has been totally rewritten to reflect the networks of the late 1990s and beyond.

Author, educator, and researcher Andrew S. Tanenbaum, winner of the ACM Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award, carefully explains how networks work inside, from the hardware technology up through the most popular network applications. The book takes a structured approach to networking, starting at the bottom (the physical layer) and gradually working up to the top (the application layer). The topics covered include:

  • Physical layer (e.g., copper, fiber, radio, and satellite communication)
  • Data link layer (e.g., protocol principles, HDLC, SLIP, and PPP)
  • MAC Sublayer (e.g., IEEE 802 LANs, bridges, new high-speed LANs)
  • Network layer (e.g., routing, congestion control, internetworking, IPv6)
  • Transport layer (e.g., transport protocol principles, TCP, network performance)
  • Application layer (e.g., cryptography, email, news, the Web, Java, multimedia)

In each chapter, the necessary principles are described in detail, followed by extensive examples taken from the Internet, ATM networks, and wireless networks.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Don't get this book if you want to learn networks from the ground up - it's not very well composed, meandering, and has very little diagrams to back up the pages of text. You'd be far better of buying something like a Ciscopress title, or one of the many Sybex/McGrawHill/Coriolis books on basic internetworking.
I'm now a network consultant, but bought this book a few years back when I was moving in from a different technical area - I read the majority of the book, but none of it gelled or furthered my understanding too well. Reading it now, I can see why - it suffers from lack of direction, and misses out whole areas that are real fundamentals. IP addressing gets a page, whereas things like modulation techniques get reams.
All in all, it suffers from going waay too in depth in certain areas, yet skips over sections that the majority of people will want to read, and lacks in diagrams to explain things visually.
Ian.
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By A Customer on 2 Dec. 2000
Format: Paperback
This classical book provided me with most of the information I needed. Somehow the author has managed to write something that covers most of the field, yet provides substantial depth. It is a book that can be used both by academic and industrial technical people.
The writing style can only be described as EXCELLENT: in-depth yet understandable and making you want to read on!
Why I did not give it 5 stars? It should pay (more) attention to everything to do with internet streaming, multicast, QoS, LFNs (satellite communications), tunneling (VPNs) and other more recent topics, as otherwise the book risks to get a bit outdated.
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Format: Paperback
I have had this book for quite a while know and I like it very much. It is not a book for beginners however it is one of those books that you can use as a reference for many years. It is well written but quite technical in places and you may have to read some sections quiet a few times until the penny finally drops. This book helped me a lot whist I was a mature student studing Computing and I would recommend.
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Format: Paperback
This book is simply great... unlike other technical books that feel like they're the personal memoires of the author and are meant to remain that way, this book is extremely well-written. It is like reading a novel, but by the end of it you've learnt AND understood the bulk concepts related to computer networks. Mr. Tanenbaum must have a wealth of experience in explaining these concepts to people, because he uses very crafty analogies to help the reader visualise certain difficult concepts. Overall, I must say that this book is perfect for the student that wants to make a certain head-way on his own in this subject.
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Format: Paperback
We were recommended this book by our Networking lecturer at Sheffield Uni, so of course I approached it with some scepticism. However, I found myself completely surprised how clear and easy to understand it was. Key concepts are explained in everyday language, acronyms and jargon are gently introduced and the book actually begins to be enjoyable. So if you want to understand all the technicalities that have gone into the wonder of networks and indeed the Internet - buy this book!
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