Buy Used
£7.19
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Brit-Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Simply Brit: We have dispatched from our UK warehouse books of good condition to over 1 million satisfied customers worldwide. We are committed to providing you with a reliable and efficient service at all times.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Complete Roman Army Hardcover – 15 Sep 2003

4.5 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£23.75 £7.19
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Thames & Hudson; 01 edition (15 Sept. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0500051240
  • ISBN-13: 978-0500051245
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 2.5 x 26.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 74,203 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

If you or someone you love has an interest in Rome, ancient history, or military history, this would make an excellent gift come Christmas. " --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Adrian Goldsworthy studied at Oxford University. His publications include Roman Warfare, The PunicWars and Cannae.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The book is a bit disappointing. There are some bad mistakes like naming a "Gladius" to "Spatha" in one picture. Is it also too hard to have also good pictures of republican and late roman re-enactors in one book instead of those high-empire "Ermine Street Quard" guys who seem to be everywhere? Why are there whole-page pictures of Hadrian`s crumbling walls in colour and then a tiny black-and-white picture of a very interesting looking late roman soldiers? Bad editing, I quess. Also the illustrations are very disappointing and rudimentary. They also give the wrong impressions for example of roman swords. The shape of "Mainz type" sword is awful and in comparison to newer "Pompeii style" sword they were usually longer.
The text is very good like always with Adrian Goldsworthy, although there`s not much new. So there`s plenty of room for another basic book about roman army, this book won`t fill the need. The "dream book" about roman army would be in my mind a combination of Peter Connolly`s illustrations, Daniel Peterson "Roman Legions Recreated in Coulour Photographs" style photos and Adrian Goldsworthy`s writing. We are still waiting for a "Complete Roman Army".
2 Comments 71 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Goldsworthy's book is a compendium of information about the roman army in its republican and imperial forms. He has section on the life of the roman sodlier,the army on campaign,and the army in late antiquity.Newcomers to the field will find a useful summary of roman history in the beginning of the book along with a chronology of Rome's war.At the end there is a glossary of latin terms plus a useful list of scholarly works for those wishing to do further study. Goldsw. has a talent for condensing a tremendous amount of information into books that are eminently readable and lively. Leaving aside his penchant for never discussing intelligence (one would never know what the speculatores or the frumentarii did by this book),readers are given a good foundation of knowledge on the daily life and activities of roman sodlier. The book's accessibility and the lack of footnotes mark this as a popular work for a general audience.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Goldsworthy is perhaps the best living writer on Rome. This brilliant book follows the development of the Roman Army from its mythic founding to the collapse of the West in the 5C BCE, over about 1,200 years. The writing is dense and to the point, skipping narrative treatment for hard-nosed analysis. He seeks to answer the questions of what made the Roman Army unique, how it adapted to different circumstances, and what interplay of its relation to the political institutions, both as protector and source of change, and finally what its legacy is.

For the first few centuries, the Roman Army was essentially a citizens' militia, drawn from the landed classes (largely farmers for the infantry) and commanded by the patrician aristocracy in the Senate. They were not particularly well organized, rushing into battle to establish heroic honor, much like the soldiers of Alexander. But there were differences that survived for a millenium: Rome always fought to win instead of seeking tactical advantage and, rather than subjugating conquered peoples, they attempted to coop them, first by leaving their elites in charge and then by employing them as foot soldiers.

As Rome consolidated her hold over central and southern Italy, her armies also began to organize themselves into larger units, particularly after the city was occupied by the Celts. In the first excursion outside of Italy (to Sicily to fight Carthage), Rome developed a navy, which they rebuilt several times with relentless determination.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Good reference book for beginners on the subject.
Sadly battle maps and graphics are very rudimentary.
Too expensive for what one gets.
Comment 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 1 Jan. 2005
Format: Hardcover
I picked up this book being interested in the Roman millitary but not knowing a thing on the subect. After simply browsing through several chapters, I knew enough to write an essay. The writing, whilst sometimes vague and confusing, is extremely informative for the greater part. The pictures are a fine addition, and the battle descriptions are worth praise.
The book is divided into three sections. The Early Army, from the founding of Rome to the Legionary. The Proffesional Army, from Marian to the Batlle of Adrianople, and the Army of Late Antiquity. The ill fated army that fought at the collapse of the western empire. In fact, it is essentiall to note that the Byzantine Empire hardly gets a mention in the works, although most intrepid historians should start off with the 'tradditional' roman solider. Each section is divided into sub-chapters, detailing things such as seige and the average soldier's working life.
To conclude, a great book that you will treasure, mostly because of it's hefty price tag.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the modern classics in the field. As always dr. Goldsworthy's writing style is clear and objective.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback