£29.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Complete Babylonian: Teac... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Complete Babylonian: Teach Yourself Paperback – 27 Aug 2010

4.5 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£29.99
£14.89 £15.99
Promotion Message 10% Bulk Discount 1 Promotion(s)

Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£29.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save 10% on Books for Schools offered by Amazon.co.uk when you purchase 10 or more of the same book. Here's how (terms and conditions apply) Enter code SCHOOLS2016 at checkout. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

  • Complete Babylonian: Teach Yourself
  • +
  • Cuneiform
  • +
  • Myths from Mesopotamia Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others (Oxford World's Classics)
Total price: £44.46
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Teach Yourself (27 Aug. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340983884
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340983881
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 91,822 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

"as you move through the book you become more and more excited about learning this language" (Amazon reviewer)

Book Description

Discover a new and effective way to learn Babylonian.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This new course in Babylonian (the Akkadian dialect spoken in Babylon) is quite an ambitious work. True, it doesn't really tackle the cuneiform script (this is introduced towards the end of the book) but it does cover an awful lot of Babylonian. The author presents both Old Babylonian (OB), the earliest form of the dialect, and Standard Babylonian (SB), the later literary dialect largely modelled on OB, and does so by means of exercises each of which involves normalizing a cuneiform text (in transcription) and then translating it. The course will give the reader the real ability to approach a Babylonian text and translating it, at least from the published transcriptions. Learning to read cuneiform should be reasonably straightforward as the learner will understand the writing system reasonably well (though he will still have to learn to deal with the additional task of learning to choose between the graphically indistinguishable phonetic alternatives within the writing system).

Small gripes: the author takes a current rather trendy way of teaching entirely from 'authentic materials', so no English-Babylonian exercises. He makes the suggestion that the reader can if he wishes use the key to translate from English to Babylonian, but the key includes the English translation accompanied by the normalized Babylonian text that the student is trying to translate to. (No English-Babylonian vocabulary either, no doubt because of the lack of exercises, something that would have been a help.) So it will appeal less to 'hobby linguists' who like to produce ancient languages, and to those of us who believe that composition in a language is the best tool for deepening ones knowledge of a language.
Read more ›
8 Comments 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have been struggling with Caplice's 'Intoduction to Akkadian' which I have found to be extremely difficult to work with, mainly because the information in his book is presented in such a 'condensed' manner; rather like a lesson plan or 'crib' sheet for a teacher who has most of the knowledge in his head, although I concede that it would probably serve as a fine set of notes to accompany one of his courses. But it is not for the teach yourself beginner such as myself.
Martin Worthington's book however is targeted at exactly my type of learner and, so far, I have found it to be an easy to use introduction to Babylonian (a 'dialect' of Akkadian).
Some might find the limited content concerning cuneiform writing a disappointment but, I think he has taken the right approach for a beginner: get the basics of the language established using transliterated and normalised texts before delving into the world of cuneiform script itself.
I am very happy with this book.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I will say, quite simply, that this is a very good book and after trying other introductions to Akkadian, I would recommend this one above the others. In terms of background, I am not a linguist and I have never seriously learned a foreign language before and I am now working my way through Andrew George's "The Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic: Introduction, Critical Edition and Cuneiform Texts", so I can testify that with no previous linguistic background this work can get you to the point where you can read Babylonian literature.

There are three major strengths to this book in my opinion:

1. The explanations are not terse, as is common in most introductory books, and most points of grammar receive a decent discussion. I realise that those who have learned other inflected languages before might find the explanation of what cases are to be redundant, but I imagine you will be glad for this level of exposition when you reach the verbal system, which is the most difficult component of the language.
More importantly there is quite often an attempt to convey the "sense" of some grammatical construction, something I found wanting in other books, i.e. why would somebody choose this form instead of that one, the shade of meaning offered by choosing this construction over another, e.t.c. Other textbooks left me with the feeling that I was learning how to be a machine for converting Babylonian into English, rather than being able to fluidly read the language.

2. You learn three stages of the language simultaneously: Old, Middle, Standard (A literary language modelled after the two earlier stages, the spoken language at the time was Neo-Babylonian).
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For two decades and more I had wanted to learn Akkadian, the umbrella-term for Babylonian and Assyrian. I tried three books:

- David Marcus 'A Manual of Akkadian' - this uses a kind of direct method, teaching grammatical points as they arise, so that the student ends up with a pointillistic impression of the grammar, with no clear overview. The explanation of the verbal system is desperately unhelpful. Furthermore you are forced to learn the cuneiform script, which involves memorising hundreds of signs, many of them polyvalent. I found the book unusable.

- Richard Caplice 'Introduction to Akkadian' - thorough, but so compressed as to be horribly indigestible. Here too you are forced to learn the cuneiform script. This book too, whilst maybe useful as a reference grammar, is unusable as a textbook for learning the language.

- John Huehnergard 'Grammar of Akkadian' - a very very thorough introduction to the language, introducing new grammatical points bit by bit, and introducing the cuneiform script gradually too. A beginner may find it overwhelming, and the grammatical explanations are written in a curiously convoluted way. The sentences for translation in the early chapters are mind-numbingly dull. It's an excellent book, but it's not fun. If you buy it, make sure you also buy the extra volume with the key to the exercises, otherwise you will struggle.

And now here comes Martin Worthington with 'Teach Yourself Complete Babylonian'. At last we have an intelligent, lucid, practical textbook. The language is taught entirely in transliteration, so that you can learn it thoroughly without having to do battle with the cuneiform script.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback