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The Compleat Trespasser: Journeys Into Forbidden Britain by [Bainbridge, John]
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The Compleat Trespasser: Journeys Into Forbidden Britain Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Length: 179 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

John Bainbridge has been an outdoors journalist and access to the countryside campaigner for over forty years. He has contributed to a wide range of outdoors magazines and broadcast widely on television and radio. He is the author of over thirty books on British towns and countryside.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 291 KB
  • Print Length: 179 pages
  • Publisher: Fellside Books; 1 edition (9 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CCQYAMO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #230,703 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a nicely balanced account of roaming around the countryside as a joy and the history of legality of such activity. The chapters alternate, one being information and the next being a personal account. Bainbridge is a good storyteller.

He is also passionate that we rediscover some of the old ways, whether they are ridgeways, farm and parish roads blocked by a rich person's house and lost to anyone else, or the ways of children who simply explored without regard to rules and rulemongerers. Bainbridge is not only a good storyteller, but also an investigative journalist.

Being critical (and why not - it shouldn't put anyone off), I found the editting a little inconsistent (eg style of quotes), and there was too much about the Kinder Scout trespass for me personally, and not enough about trespassing on horseback or cycle.

The ebook finishes with an annotated list of works worth looking at, and useful links, for example to Open Spaces Society (which includes horses and cycles) and Ramblers (which does not).
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a fine book for ramblers, hikers and wild-campers. It covers trespass law, history and the author's own experiences and encounters with landowners, game keepers and others who would try to stop us from walking our own land. I especially enjoyed the accounts of the author's boyhood trespassing which brought to mind the ever excellent William Brown (he of the'Just William' books).
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A brilliant book about walking and the rights and wrongs of trespass. I believe we all should have the right to walk in our beautiful country, as long as we do no damage, why not??
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is written with the panache and style of a novelist; the passion of someone who truly cares for the land we all share; and the diligence of a historian who writes of the almost-lost details of times not so long passed. A 'must read' for anyone who cares about our glorious countryside.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Exciting and informative book, worth reading, give you an incite into past history, lots of good advice and great value a must read book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
According to Bainbridge, too much of England is privately owned and barred to the public. In this book he sets out to convince us that it shouldn’t be; that the right to roam should be universal; and that the way to achieve it is to carry on walking wherever we please, with or without permission and without consideration for others feelings.

He describes with authentic feeling and some fine writing how much he has enjoyed some scenic walks and would like to do more of them. Being authentic, this desire comes across as the main pillar of his argument. The other pillars come across as less authentic, less substantiated and much flimsier: some shallow historical speculation; the bullying tactics of some landowners and gamekeepers – undeniable, but piecemeal; the author’s exasperation with the softly-softly approach of footpath preservation societies and the CRoW legislation.

The book does make you think about the right to roam, but it would make you think much more deeply if it gave fair consideration to other points of view. Farmers and other landowners don’t necessarily sit on tracts of land just to stop others enjoying it: they use it to produce the country’s food and preserve its landscapes, and how would they know whether the stranger walking through their crops or lurking in their woodland at night was simply enjoying the countryside or out to cause mischief or steal valuable stock or machinery?

The author doesn’t seem to recognise that societies like the Ramblers and other bodies working behind the scenes to promote access may use less dramatic tactics than Rothman and other mass trespassers, but could be said to have achieved a good deal more by quiet negotiation than by confrontation.
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