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The Coming of Bill by [Wodehouse, P. G.]
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The Coming of Bill Kindle Edition

3.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Length: 319 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product Description

About the Author

Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse was an English humorist, whose body of work includes novels, short stories, plays, poems, song lyrics and numerous pieces of journalism. He enjoyed enormous popular success during a career that lasted more than seventy years and his many writings continue to be widely read.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1197 KB
  • Print Length: 319 pages
  • Publisher: SMK Books (10 Jun. 2015)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00DVTFBN8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #251,749 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Many authors today find it interesting to write novels about the early part of the 20th century. I prefer generally to read novels written at the same time by fine authors. The period details are ever so much more accurate and convincing that way. With the long and distinguished career of that brilliant comic author, Mr. P.G. Wodehouse, there are many treasures to be enjoyed in this vein.
In The Coming of Bill, Mr. Wodehouse wrote a classic about the troubled nature of wooing, family influences and rivalry among spouses for the upper hand. Into all of this turmoil comes one delightful little boy, Bill, who turns out to have the right stuff to be a future boxer.
The Coming of Bill is the unlikely story of how Ruth Bannister and Kirk Winfield came to meet and marry, abetted by Ruth's Aunt Lora Porter and Kirk's friend, Steve. Banished by an angry John Bannister, Ruth's father, they live in bliss as their marriage begins and Bill is born. Kirk abandons his feeble artistic efforts to spend time with Ruth and Bill. But unexpected setbacks in his investments make him take the desperate gamble to leave for a year to find his fortune in South American gold mines. He returns, lucky to be alive, with a greatly changed personal situation. His wife's father has died, leaving her wealthy and bored, and she soon finds Kirk and Bill boring, too. To save herself from distasteful duties, Ruth has turned over her parenting duties to a nanny and Mrs. Porter's obsessive fear of germs. To come near Bill, you have to be bathed in boric acid. The marriage is about as friendly.
Then, the marriage is rocked by Kirk's unwillingness to play along any more. Can this marriage be saved?
In most of Mr.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
There is almost nothing by Plum that I wouldn't read but this is very mediocre, so unlike his best. He had a "bad war" when he talked Nazi propaganda over the radio, I don't blame him in the least for this, I'm sure he didn't intend it.

But the point of the review is the book. You don't really want to read it unless you are a Wodehouse fan and even then think twice.
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Format: Hardcover
Unlike the bulk of P G Wodehouse's lexicon `The Coming of Bill' is not a farce but a story which under uses the comic characters Wodehouse attempts to shoehorn into his unfamiliar framework. The Butler is Keggs, familiar from his appearance as `The Good Angel' in `The Man Upstairs and other Stories' and also `A Damsel in Distress' but his appearance is really a waste of a good name. Keggs' appears to realise that he is wasted in the piece and gives an unconvincing performance.

The language is still fantastic, that Baby Bill, `as a conversationalist, perhaps the best description of him is to say he tried hard' sums up Wodehouse's easy manner. However the themes are too big and ambiguous for the writer, they are almost reminiscent of Dickens at his most epic. Although Wodehouse has a natural talent for writing they are for writing as Wodehouse not as Dickens.

As a member of Fathers 4 Justice and campaigner for Fathers Rights the story of Bill's father being excluded from his life after he falls out with Bill's mother Ruth should appeal to me. Unfortunately that he solves all the families' problems by kidnapping the child should not be set up as panacea for all contact issues. The modern family courts do not encourage such direct action; they would probably prescribe two hours supervised contact in a church hall every other week.
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