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The Colour of Magic: Discworld: The Unseen University Collection (Discworld Hardback Library) Hardcover – 7 Aug 2014

4.3 out of 5 stars 527 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz (7 Aug. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1473205328
  • ISBN-13: 978-1473205321
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 2.4 x 19.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (527 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 14,168 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

The Colour of Magic is Terry Pratchett's maiden voyage through the bizarre land of Discworld. His entertaining and witty series has grown to more than 20 books, and this is where it all starts--with the tourist Twoflower and his hapless wizard guide, Rincewind ("All wizards get like that... it's the quicksilver fumes. Rots their brains. Mushrooms, too."). Pratchett spoofs fantasy clichés--and everything else he can think of--while marshalling a profusion of characters through a madcap adventure. The Colour of Magic is followed by The Light Fantastic. --Blaise Selby, Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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"Ingenious, brilliant, and hilarious."--Washington Post

Ingenious, brilliant, and hilarious. --Washington Post" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Terry's death did not really hit me properly until the following though entered my head: "No more Rincewind. I won't get to read anything else about Rincewind". I can't tell you how immeasurably sad that made me feel. How utterly sad, and equally angry that we don't live in a world where Death can be cheated and bargained with, as long as you have 4cc of mouse blood and a fast mouth.

It is no understatement to say that we have lost one of the world's greatest ever humorous novelists. I can only hope that there is some kind of afterlife - however unlikely that may sometimes seem - and that Terry has by now met up with Douglas Adams in some ethereal bar, and they are happily discussing the absurdity of human nature together over a Pan Galactic Gargleblaster and some Klatchian coffee.

And here, at the end of things, let's talk briefly about the start of things - the first book in the Discworld series. A book I first bought in 1985 from WH Smith with several week's worth of pocket money. Okay, The Colour Of Magic has its flaws, and it doesn't necessarily sparkle with its use of language the same way that Terry's later books would do, but it makes up for having a few rough edges by being so crammed full of heart and soul that it's enough to make you weep. Everything that Terry would go on to refine and sharpen in the following 39 Discworld books is in evidence here, in an embryonic stage. Rincewind is, and always will be, one of the greatest fantasy characters ever created, precisely because he is one of the worst fantasy characters ever created. If you gave him a magic ring and told him to toss it in a volcano, he'd give you a look in no uncertain terms, and be headed for the horizon before you could say 'Mithrandir'. I love him without reservation.
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Format: Paperback
I started this book having only read one other book by Terry Pratchett - I was kind of working my way up to reading the massive Discworld Series, so I started with The Carpet People (also a great book) in the summer, which I loved. So, out of curiosity at all the Discworld hype, I got hold of a copy of The Colour of Magic and started reading (despite various people advising me that reading them in order was not necessary).
I'm glad I did - I can't say I was an avid reader of the book straight from the start, but it soon became that way. I loved the characters in this book - Twoflower, Rincewind and Death in particular had me in stitches - and the setting, a flat, disc-shaped world carried on the backs of four giant elephants etc etc, and the amount of creativity with which Pratchett crafted his world, had me captivated.
I have now finished The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic, the sequel, having read them one after another. Although standing alone they are fantastic books, treating them as one book is probably a good idea, going by the cliffhanger ending of The Colour of Magic.
I would recommend this book to any fans of The Carpet People and other books by Terry Pratchett. It's a great book, so anybody else: read it!
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Format: Paperback
The Colour of Magic (this book) is the first in the phenonemonly successful "Discworld" series by humour and fantasy British author Terry Pratchett. Well, this was not the first discworld book I read. The first one I read was "Sourcery". I thought it was far too weird, so I left it for a while, but then tried "Witches Abroad" and loved that. I read some more after that and was hooked on the discworld collection. It's strange, they say "Never Judge A Book By It's Cover", but it was the covers of the books that drew me in on that rainy afternoon in the school library. Sorry, I forgot to mention, I'm only 13. But don't go away! Stay and read this!(and remember to say that this review was helpful!!)
But back to the book. The Colour of Magic begins by explaining what the Discworld actually is. For those of you who don't know, it's actually a huge plate that is supported by 5 elephants that are supported by a huge turtle, known as the Great A'tuin. Yep. That fact that the world (in the book) is a disc is obviously like how our ancestors thought the world was flat.
We are introduced to our main characters, who are Rincewind the inept and cowardly wizard, Twoflower, a short tourist with (judging by the front cover) four eyes, and a chest that has hundreds of little legs and a mind of it's own, known as "the Luggage". There are of course more characters, like Hrun the (don't say this to him) barbarian and the wonderful talking corpse. At first the characters spend time in a bar in the twin city of Ankh Morpork, where Twoflower's money seems to be worth more than he thinks in Ankh.
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Format: Paperback
Having read the entire series of 30-odd Discworld novel's in publication order over the past 16-odd years, I decided it was time to revisit the first novel in the series. Would it really be as good as I remembered, or would it seem inferior compared to those later Discworld novels?
The Discworld of The Colour of Magic certainly feels like a different place to Pratchett's more recent offerings, but it's certainly not inferior. Nowadays Pratchett seems to use the Discworld as a distorted mirror of our own world, with allusions to real world politics and problems - in comparison the Discworld of The Colour of Magic is a simple (but effective) satire on the typical post-Tolkien Fantasy genre. This first novel introduces the long-running characters of the inept wizard Rincewind and the oddly anthropomorphic Death (what no Librarian? - my memory must have cheated), and uses the device of Rincewind having to protect gullible tourist Twoflower as a means of providing a brief tour of the Discworld. The novel is set out as four linked short story's: in The Colour of Magic Twoflower manages to burn the city of Ankh-Morpork to the ground by the introduction of insurance; The Sending of Eight adds Conan rip-off Hrun the Barbarian in a typical Dungeons & Dragons quest to destroy a Lovecraftian monster and capture some treasure; The Lure of the Wrym introduces an upside down mountain and dragons who only exist if you believe in them; while Close to the Edge finds Rincewind and Twoflower getting caught up in a mission to voyage over the edge of the Discworld itself (a theme Pratchett would return to years later in The Last Hero). Yes, it's a lot shallower than later Discworld outings, but it's also a lot funnier, and the Discworld is a much more fantastic place.
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