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Coffee in Cuba by [Graham, Robert Noble]
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Coffee in Cuba Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Length: 67 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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About the Author

I was born in Glasgow at the end of the second world war. Events suggest the news of my birth brought about the immediate surrender of Japan. I took degrees in French and German and English largely to hide from the fact that I didn`t really want to join the working world. Ultimately I found employment in the publishing, oil and financial services industries, eventually running my own small financial services business which ran at a good profit despite the fact that much of my time was spent having tea and chocolate biscuits served to clients as they poured out their problems with ,wife ,children, mistress, prostate or the planning authorities. I got married and had two wonderful children who are now successful scientists. Relationships can be difficult and I divorced in 1998. All this time I wanted to write. I had some success when BBC Radio 4 broadcast my play `A Nocturne for Mr. Yeats` starring the wonderful Bernard Hepton ( of Colditz and Tinker Tailor fame). I published the novel `The Celebrity of Anders Hecht` in 2006 and it is available as a physical book on Amazon. I sold my business recently and now at last have time to write and money to afford a bowl of soup as I do so. `Masks of Venice`, now available as an e-book is based on an idea I`ve had for all my adult life but could not find a framework for. It indulges my love of Europe, especially Italy and Spain. I`d now add Greece to that list, a wonderful and tragic country. The catalyst for the book came from a woman who had read `Anders Hecht` and told me to my astonishment that I had an amazing understanding of how women think. This is a claim for which there is no evidence whatever in my emotional life. She asked if I could write a novel from a woman`s point of view. I liked the challenge and this is the result, also letting me play with questions such as `do we have past lives?` `what effect would they have? ` My latest novel , The Women from Crete` is a crime story set largely in Spain but also in Germany and Crete. It features the legendary detective Chief Inspector Miguel Rojas, the man with no passions. Rojas is courteous but aloof, remote, insomniac, a caffeine addict. Although he has never known the feeling of love or perhaps any other passion, his insight into those who do is astonishing. It is a crime story and a love story I hope to publish more in the near future.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 452 KB
  • Print Length: 67 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Robert Noble Graham; 1 edition (7 July 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00DTUM4O8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,362,864 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback
"Coffee in Cuba" is an entertaining travelogue of Robert Graham's trips to various parts of the world. Many of Mr. Graham's unintended adventures are a result of his propensity for getting lost which probably made for more interesting travel experiences. The book starts off with a trip made to Moscow and Leningrad during the time of the Soviet Union. This is an interesting contrast to the next chapter which describes his explorations of Rome. Then it's back to another communist country, Cuba circa 1999, when it is in the process of pulling itself out of devastating poverty. Then he's off again to Rhodes and Greece. Mr. Graham is a congenial travel companion full of perceptive descriptions and witty observations. His book often reminded me of another travelogue by a well-known author, Mark Twain's "Innocents Abroad".
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another great travelogue from Mr Graham, I just hope I get to Cuba before it all changes
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny tales even an Ugly American can enjoy 11 Jan. 2013
By Matt Valenti - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am the quintessential provincial American - unsophisticated, under-educated, and lacking in even the most basic cultural sophistication. I hardly know the difference, for example, between a Chardonnay and a Cabernet. I speak no language other than English, having failed my high school French class, and despite studiously listening to the Talking Heads sing "Psycho Killer" I still think "Qu'est-ce que c'est" is some kind of pie made out of eggs and cheese.

As for international travel, all I can boast of is a visit to the Canadian side of Niagara Falls when I was a five-year old boy and a chartered day trip over the border to Tijuana a few years ago. (I did spend a few days travelling through Texas, but it's still open for discussion whether the Lone Star State counts as a foreign nation.)

Nevertheless, I simply love good travel writing, if for no other reason than to tease myself about all the fine sights I'm not standing in line to see and all the interesting locals I'm not handing my credit card to. Which is why I was delighted to read Robert Graham's accounts of his many experiences travelling the world. Though I envy his quieter moments sipping wine or coffee at a quaint local café, surrounded by rich history or gorgeous scenery, it's his often hilarious descriptions of the many downsides to travel - the disappointments, confusions, and discomforts that most tourists conveniently leave out of their post-travel gloating - that left me with the satisfying feeling that I'm not missing anything, after all. Or, as Graham himself puts it in his foreword, "Quite often I've found it more of a disruption than I wanted but since I have very rarely been forced to go anywhere I have only myself to blame."

But the reader "Coffee in Cuba" will hardly find anything to blame in Graham's witty accounts of travelling the world - like his tour through Russia in its bad old Soviet days, where a hotel light switches turn on bath faucets and the food is neither recognizable by sight or discernible by taste; or of getting lost in Rome and discovering a warm, inviting restaurant that seemed to materialize out of thin air like magic, only to disappear and never be found again; or of Necromanteio, the Greek town fabled to be the entrance way to the land of the dead, where the ancients came to attempt to communicate with their departed loved-ones ("Even then they had the strange view, still prevalent, that their late auntie whose advice they regularly ignored in life was suddenly worth listening to just because she's dead"). It's observations like the last one that make Graham a pleasure to read, regardless of which exotic locale he's currently lost in.

Whether you are well-traveled like Graham, or unwell-traveled like me, there is much to enjoy in this well-written and clever collection of travel tales.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful! 11 Jan. 2013
By Suellen Ocean - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Coffee in Cuba is a fun and informative travelogue. Robert Graham's writing is intelligent, humorous, historically significant, clever and honest. Graham's fresh writing makes one feel as though they too are walking the cobbled streets of Rome or enjoying fresh fruit in a Cuban Cafe. He's funny!
4.0 out of 5 stars Witty reminiscence of the road taken 4 Jan. 2013
By Mandogirl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Coffee in Cuba is an entertaining travelogue of Robert Graham's trips to various parts of the world. Many of Mr. Graham's unintended adventures are a result of his propensity for getting lost, which probably made for more interesting travel experiences. The book starts off with a trip that he made to Moscow and Leningrad during the time of the Soviet Union. This is an interesting contrast to his next chapter which describes his explorations of Rome. Then it's back to another communist country, Cuba, circa 1999 when it is in the process of pulling itself out of devastating poverty.Then he's off again to Rhodes and North West Greece. Mr. Graham is a congenial travel companion full of perceptive descriptions and witty observations. His book often reminded me of another well-known travelogue, Mark Twain's "Innocents Abroad".
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