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Code Zero (German) Paperback – 1 Jun 2008

4.3 out of 5 stars 215 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Ullstein Taschenbuchvlg. (Jun. 2008)
  • Language: German
  • ISBN-10: 3548269397
  • ISBN-13: 978-3548269399
  • Product Dimensions: 11.9 x 3.5 x 19.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (215 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,584,750 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Having been a long-time fan of Mr Follett's early work, I was a bit disappointed by his last two novels (The Third Twin & The Hammer of Eden).
"Code to Zero", which is again set in the Eastern US, starts off quite well and is an entertaining read over all, but after finishing it (which doesn't take very long at barely 300 pages net) I found it suffered from the same flaws that Ken Follett's other recent novels had: it's just too superficial.
The lost memory idea is not really new, but a gifted author like Mr Follett should have made so much more out of a pretty simple storyline. Like its two predecessors, "Code to Zero" reads like a TV-thriller script which includes a strangely shallow love interest sideline.
I'd rather wait two or even three years for a new Follett novel that's up to the standards of "The Pillars of the Earth", "Night Over Water" or "Eye of the Needle" than be slightly disappointed again by another rush-job like the new book.
I really wish this review could've been more positive, but in comparison to earlier Follett classics "Code to Zero" is a terribly flat affair.
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Format: Hardcover
Warning: Many people who start to read this book will not be able to put it down. As a result, you may miss some sleep unless you start reading early in the day. I stayed up until 2:17 a.m. to finish it.
The story opens with an unforgettable scene. A man awakens on the floor of a men's rest room in Union Station in Washington, D.C. He has a terrible headache and no memory of who he is. He finds that he is dressed like a street person, and a man awakening in another part of the rest room tells him that he passed out from too much drink.
The story evolves from there at solving three questions. First, who is he? Second, how did he lose his memory? Third, how can he avert the potential harm that led him to lose his memory?
The story takes place primarily in 1958 as the United States was about to launch its first satellite, Explorer I. Flashbacks take the action back as far as 1941, when many of the characters were students together at Harvard University.
When people ask me about a novel, there are a certain set of predictable questions that I get. As I thought about this book, I realized that it had something for almost everyone. My wife always asks me if it's a love story. Well, this one certainly qualifies as it builds the emotional relationships between two of the leading characters over 27 years.
The next question is whether it is a fast read or not. This one also qualifies, because you are pulled along by the action.
After that, someone always asks me if the story is like any other stories they might have read.
Read more ›
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
Espionage is at the core of this Cold War era thriller and the suspense sizzles. The time is 1958 when the space race was young and the Soviets seemed to be outdistancing the America. The protagonist is an inventive, complex study - he's Dr. Claude Lucas, an important cog in a new space launch. However, he's also a victim of amnesia, an apparent vagrant in Washington D.C.'s Union Station. Toss in the CIA, a covey of spies, and an old college buddy of Lucas's who is more foe than friend. Some might deem this a classic take on chased and chasers - not so. Thanks to the deft Mr. Follett, it's a no-holds-barred, riveting epic. And, so are the readings. Frank Muller, who has been featured on over 150 audiobooks, offers a splendid rendering of crisp, character driven dialogue in the two abridged versions on cassette and CD. While Obie award-winner George Guidall, an actor for 40 plus years, reads the unabridged version. He takes sinister and dramatic to their zenith.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
Warning: Many people who start to read this book will not be able to put it down. As a result, you may miss some sleep unless you start reading early in the day. I stayed up until 2:17 a.m. to finish it.
The story opens with an unforgettable scene. A man awakens on the floor of a men's rest room in Union Station in Washington, D.C. He has a terrible headache and no memory of who he is. He finds that he is dressed like a street person, and a man awakening in another part of the rest room tells him that he passed out from too much drink.
The story evolves from there at solving three questions. First, who is he? Second, how did he lose his memory? Third, how can he avert the potential harm that led him to lose his memory?
The story takes place primarily in 1958 as the United States was about to launch its first satellite, Explorer I. Flashbacks take the action back as far as 1941, when many of the characters were students together at Harvard University.
When people ask me about a novel, there are a certain set of predictable questions that I get. As I thought about this book, I realized that it had something for almost everyone. My wife always asks me if it's a love story. Well, this one certainly qualifies as it builds the emotional relationships between two of the leading characters over 27 years.
The next question is whether it is a fast read or not. This one also qualifies, because you are pulled along by the action.
After that, someone always asks me if the story is like any other stories they might have read.
Read more ›
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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