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Cluster 71
 
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Cluster 71

30 Mar. 2012 | Format: MP3

£6.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £13.30 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:43
30
2
15:36
30
3
21:13
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have given this five stars - but let me be clear and say that really there's no way to measure the "music" on this one. In fact, argument could be made that it's not "music" at all, but rather a wall of sounds like the echoes of an industrial revolution.

I wouldn't ordinarily even bother to comment, but when I looked this up on Amazon no-one had left a review, and that's a pity because - some time one day in the dim distant future - someone might stumble upon this listing and wonder: "What's that like?"

And the fact is, it's not like ANYTHING. While Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream were also making some rather radical Krautrock around this time, only Cluster it seems went for something that was totally beyond the boundaries of what constituted "music". This album is, basically, combination of sounds, rather than notes. It's all quite mechanical, noisy, and metallic. Machines groan, moan, and shudder. The structure is to have no structure, but don't confuse this with improvisation that bends the rules of the styles it's based upon, or stretches the instruments. This one breaks all the rules, and a kitchen sideboard can serve as an instrument.

I'm not sure what else to say. Tangerine Dream's Electronic Meditation won't prepare you for this. Klaus Schulze' Irrlicht won't. Stockhausen's experiments won't. The closest I could name - though it does it scant justice - is Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music. Though this (Cluster 71) is much much better.

Will you like this? Well, I don't mind saying I do. So if you're in a really adventurous mood, you might too. if nothing else you can ue it to convince your friends that you really have gone mad.
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Format: Audio CD
Timely re-issue of this early 'Cluster' album. Fantastic, electronic exploration/journey into sound using hybrid equipment, (note the fact that no synthesisers were used on the recording). It starts as it means to go on, completely 'out-there', throbbing, surging with power and making no concessions to what was deemed commercial in Germany or anywhere at the time (i.e 3rd rate copies of U.K and U.S Rock being the norm). It's also a prescient recording as it pre-figures a lot of 21st century music.
Also check out these equally fine CD's: Cluster II, Zuckerzeit, Harmonia, Cluster & Eno
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this album on a hunch, having never heard Cluster (although I had heard Harmonia) before. However enthralled I was by "Musik von Harmonia"'s charm, this came as a complete suprise. I knew that it was going to be pretty weird machine music but I thought it might build up to some melody.
I was wrong.
My first thoughts were "My washing machine can makes these kind of noises" and "Phhh! What were they thinking"
This was only enhanced by the stupid CD booklet. Coming from the typically uncaring view of the American record label was what is basically a FAQs booklet.
Sporting questions like "Is this really music?" and "Why don't the tracks have names" and, most annoyingly of all; "What color [yes, the American spelling] is this music".
Sorry, have I missed something, music has a colour now!? The answer is apparently "Grey" and it goes on to explain that the original record label, Phillips "dressed it up in fancy clothes [cover art]".
What a load of tosh. There is a tiny section on credits that gives Moebius organ and various electronic treatments and Roedelius the same + slide guitar and cello.
Not even a morcel on what the musicians were doing at the time, why Schnitzler left etc.
Moving on to the music, it is basically a continued series of interuption of repeated electronic throbs with other electronic throbs, oh, and slide guitar and cello occasionally.
The one good thing provided by the booklet is the intended track names, which were abandoned as an artistic statement they are:

Dance of the Lemmings
Phallus Dei
Psychonaut

Track 1 (Dance of the Lemmings) is the most accessable (only by a very small margin as none of these are part of the hit parade) starting with a guitar pulse/repeadedly plucked string.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I haven't heard the earlier Kluster recordings with Conrad Schnitzler, but I suspect they were probably as 'difficult' as 'Cluster '71'. This is a world away from the third album 'Zuckerzeit' and a fair distance from the bridging album 'Cluster II'. The three untitled tracks consist mainly of improvised electronics around pulsing wave rhythms with some barely recognisable guitar. There is no suggestion of melody, rather the sounds you might hear in a factory. In short, these are relatively inaccessible recordings that require patience. The first track is the outstanding one. It seems to have more shape and coherence than the other two which you can listen to many times before getting a fix on them.

Just a note about the claim in another review that the tracks originally had titles. What the sleevenotes actually say is that Cluster decided not to use mickey-taking titles like other German instrumental outfits, citing three titles of albums by other bands. Not a good place to start an exploration of the genre but one to venture further along the journey.
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