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Cloud Computing Law by [Millard, Christopher]
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Cloud Computing Law Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 436 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Review

If you need to consult a great book on the legal implications of cloud computing, then look no further ... Professor Millard is responsible for a work which explores the principles of cloud computing law in a way that will remain relevant for some time. It's a book that the serious players will return to again and again. (Martin Hoskins)

This book is the result of ground-breaking research over the past four years by the core members of the Cloud Legal project at the Centre for Commercial Law at Queen Mary, University of London: Ian Walden, Kuan Hon, Simon Bradshaw, Chris Reed, Julia Hornle, Alan Cunnigham and of course Christopher Millard himself. In addition, one chapter is co-authored by Laise Da Correggio Luciano. ... The book is essentially a detailed, but easily accessible account about the legal implications of cloud computing. At the same time, it is a fascinating insight into why cloud computing is different from traditional outsourcing, and an enabler of new business models that are part of nearly everyone's daily life. (Laura Linkomies, International Report Privacy Laws and Business Data Protection and Privacy Information Worldwide)

About the Author

Christopher Millard is Professor of Privacy and Information Law at the Centre for Commercial law Studies, Queen Mary, University of London. He is also a Research Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute and is Of Counsel to the law firm Bristows. He has over 30 years experience in technology law, both in academia and legal practice, and has led the Cloud Legal Project at CCLS since it was established in 2009. He is a Fellow and former Chairman of the Society for Computers & Law and past-Chair of the Technology Law Committee of the International Bar Association. He has published widely in the computer law field and is a founding editor of the International Journal of Law and Information Technology and of International Data Privacy Law (both Oxford University Press).

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5740 KB
  • Print Length: 436 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1 edition (10 Oct. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00GLO2OGW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #501,646 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback
AN AUTHORITATIVE NEW WORK ON CLOUD COMPUTING AS A NEW SPECIALIST AREA
OF LEGAL PRACTICE

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

Having started out as a ‘computer lawyer’ in the 1980s, Professor Christopher Millard, who edits this important book on this very contemporary subject, refers to the legal and regulatory changes that have emerged in response to the advent of cloud computing.

‘Cloud Computing Law’, he says, ‘is worthy of attention as a specialist area of legal research, teaching and practice.’

Heading a team of seven expert contributors, Millard had brought at least three decades of experience and research to the compilation of this book. To cite only one example out of his dizzying list of credentials, he was asked by Microsoft in 2008 to lead a research project -- together with colleagues -- to assess the legal and regulatory implications of cloud computing.

This book synthesizes the numerous and detailed results of the subsequent Cloud Legal Project launched in 2009 which has in turn led to further research as new developments and issues have emerged in cloud computing technology.

Newly released by the Oxford University Press, the book examines, (in Millard’s words) ‘various key legal constructs and rules which apply to cloud computing, both in theory and practice’ -- with the additional objective of furthering the debate on how the governance of cloud computing may be improved.

Part I of the book explains what cloud computing actually is: in other words, it is a means by which computer services are delivered over a network (rather than housed in the hard drive of your own computer).
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Format: Kindle Edition
Professor Christopher Millard and his colleagues at the Cloud Legal Project at the Centre for Commercial Legal Studies at Queen Mary, University of London, – and colloquially known as “the Queen Mary Mafia” - have done it again.

They've given us, in a readily accessible manner, the very latest thinking on an issue that all information governance professionals need to be very familiar with.

During a reception to celebrate its launch in Brussels last week, Ken Ducatel, Head of Unit for Software, Services and Cloud at the European Commission remarked that he was so impressed with the book that he had already bought 2 copies.

There is a substantial body of law and regulation which already applies to the cloud computing sector, and it is evolving rapidly. Unfortunately, data protection compliance is a particularly difficult issue, mainly because the conceptual basis on which the current law is based (where there are known locations and clear divisions of responsibility between stakeholders, who are either data controllers or data processors) predates the reality of cloud computing.

So when is cloud computing appropriate? What scope is there to negotiate individual contracts with cloud providers? What steps are European regulators likely to take to enforce current laws? What about the relevant law enforcement, competition and consumer protection implications of cloud computing? And how much easier is the proposed new General Data Protection Regulation likely to make life for cloud users?

The book pulls no punches.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
OK as far as it goes, once you grasp that the target audience is academics and students rather than practitioners.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Useful reference
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x96a6fb94) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
HASH(0x96a68f9c) out of 5 stars An authoritative new work on cloud computing... 23 July 2014
By Phillip Taylor MBE - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
AN AUTHORITATIVE NEW WORK ON CLOUD COMPUTING AS A NEW SPECIALIST AREA
OF LEGAL PRACTICE

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

Having started out as a ‘computer lawyer’ in the 1980s, Professor Christopher Millard, who edits this important book on this very contemporary subject, refers to the legal and regulatory changes that have emerged in response to the advent of cloud computing.

‘Cloud Computing Law’, he says, ‘is worthy of attention as a specialist area of legal research, teaching and practice.’

Heading a team of seven expert contributors, Millard had brought at least three decades of experience and research to the compilation of this book. To cite only one example out of his dizzying list of credentials, he was asked by Microsoft in 2008 to lead a research project -- together with colleagues -- to assess the legal and regulatory implications of cloud computing.

This book synthesizes the numerous and detailed results of the subsequent Cloud Legal Project launched in 2009 which has in turn led to further research as new developments and issues have emerged in cloud computing technology.

Newly released by the Oxford University Press, the book examines, (in Millard’s words) ‘various key legal constructs and rules which apply to cloud computing, both in theory and practice’ -- with the additional objective of furthering the debate on how the governance of cloud computing may be improved.

Part I of the book explains what cloud computing actually is: in other words, it is a means by which computer services are delivered over a network (rather than housed in the hard drive of your own computer). As such, ‘the cloud may prove to be as disrupting an innovation as was the emergence of cheap electricity over a hundred years ago’; electricity also being a utility delivered through a network.

Part II deals with contractual issues (which must inevitably arise). Part II examines the protection of personal data in the clouds. Part IV, in addressing the issues of cloud regulation and governance, focuses on such matters as law enforcement, consumer protection and competition between cloud service providers and ends with an assessment of ways and means of developing effective cloud governance frameworks.

It seems that Millard and his team have tackled every aspect of this emerging area of law. Their plain English approach to what can be an abstruse subject will certainly be of benefit to both practitioners and scholars wishing to delve into the legal ramifications of cloud computing.

This is a carefully researched and extensively footnoted book and is very much one for our times. It will provide career-enhancing information as well as useful and indeed entertaining reading for lawyers and non-lawyers alike as further cloud development takes place.
HASH(0x968f36fc) out of 5 stars Cloud Computing De-Nebulised 6 May 2014
By Murray Royce Campbell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is a timely and useful book written by English legal experts in the field.

It unpacks the technical nuts and bolts of international cloud computing and then proceeds to transpose the relevant law onto its various elements, relationships and players.

To be sure, some of the law is unsettled and untested against the novel technologies involved, but the authors make convincing arguments regarding how the law should be interpreted and applied in various concrete circumstances and factual permutations. This effectively helps the reader to “take a view” confidently on the issues as confronted by his/her client or employer, thereby limiting risk in the present tense.

I believe this book should be on every technology lawyer’s bookshelf. It should be required reading for the members of the Article 29 Working Party. It would be preferable if the drafters of the proposed 2014 EU Data Protection Regulation also downed tools until they have read this work. US information attorneys in particular will benefit from the book’s pragmatic and comprehensive treatment of European data protection laws in the cloud environment.

It is highly recommended.

Murray Campbell
South African IT and Telecoms Lawyer
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