• RRP: £10.99
  • You Save: £0.31 (3%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
A Clergyman's Daughter has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Wordery
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: This fine as new copy is waiting for you in our UK warehouse and should be with you within 4-5 working days via Royal Mail.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Clergyman's Daughter Paperback – 28 Sep 2000

4.2 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 28 Sep 2000
£10.68
£4.23 £5.42
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£10.68 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • A Clergyman's Daughter
  • +
  • Coming Up for Air (Penguin Modern Classics)
  • +
  • Keep the Aspidistra Flying (Penguin Modern Classics)
Total price: £30.64
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; New Ed edition (28 Sept. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141184655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141184654
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 83,165 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

Volume 3 from The Complete Works Of George Orwell, available separately for the first time. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Eric Arthur Blair (1903-1950), better known by his pen-name, George Orwell, was born in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. An author and journalist, Orwell was one of the most prominent and influential figures in twentieth-century literature. His unique political allegory Animal Farm was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with the dystopia of Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. His novels and non-fiction include Burmese Days, Down and Out in Paris and London, The Road to Wigan Pier and Homage to Catalonia.


Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Despite its bad press (even Orwell himself didn't like it), 'A Clergyman's Daughter' is well worth a read.

If it was by a lesser author it would probably have a much stronger reputation than it does. As it is, yes it definitely is the weakest of his novels, but as an evocative panorama of life below-the-breadline in depression-era England it is fantastic. A lot of the scenarios (hop-picking in Kent; homeless in Trafalgar Square) will be familiar to anyone who's read Orwell's diaries or some of his essays, but alongside the unforgettable school-teaching scenes and the brilliant descriptions of life in a small, petty, curtain-twitching village, the book as whole is as good as any account I've read of what it was like to be on the fringes of society and struggling for money in the early '30s.

The general criticisms of the novel are all entirely valid. Dorothy's amnesia is never properly explained; the hop-picking scenes are too descriptive and close to Orwell's reportage diaries of his time doing this; and the 'experimental' scenes around Trafalgar Square get rather annoying and skippable after the first couple of pages; BUT, if you go into the novel, as I did, prepared for these things, then they really don't matter, and didn't mar my enjoyment of it as a whole. What was good was VERY good, enough so to make up for the weaknesses. In particular I think the chapter of the book in which Dorothy becomes a school-teacher ranks up there with anything Orwell wrote, especially in his characterisation of the detestable Mrs Creevy and the way he describes the gradual disintegration of Dorothy's initial enthusiasm and promise.
Read more ›
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a fine book, but it suffers as it is judged against Orwell's amazing canon of classic novels that have stood the test of time. Where it remains valid today is in the sense of futileness. It is in a sense an existential examination of what life is all about. Why do we struggle? Why to we make an effort and why bother? The horrified reaction of the parents when they find their girls have been taught English from Shakespeare's 'Macbeth' is because of their realisation that one of the final plot-twists in the classic text requires understanding of what a Caesarean-section involves. They prefer ignorance to understanding. Orwell again identifies yet another issue that plagues modern society, in that we prefer to judge learning at school by league tables, rather than understanding.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Like a lot of people I was 'given' Orwell to read at school and it was a case of 'OK, yeah, I can see what he's getting at but would I actually want to pick up anything by him to read for pleasure'? Then, a few years later I discovered The Clergyman's Daughter and I was hooked. Now I hasten to add that it wasn't Mr Orwell I got hooked on but just the book itself, so I can understand why this isn't Orwell purists' favourite work of his. The whole idea of a woman going from her cosseted life to an alien world which is basically on her doorstep and becoming politicised stayed with me years after reading it. I had a copy on my bookshelf for ages and kept meaning to take it down for a re-read/reassessment, it wasn't until I read The Rachel Redemption recently and was very much struck by the similarities to TC'sD (Dorothy is now the Princess Diana type wife, of a Tony Blair type PM, who gets radicalised - trust me, it works!)that I was prompted to re-read. And yes, the verdict is a positive one, maybe I was just a little more receptive all those years ago but I still think it's intelligent, inspiring and a good read. Maybe a bit 'girly' for the purists but then if it inspires young girls, why not?
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
George Orwell was a great English writer whose reputation has suffered from the tendency in English culture to regard the novel (and the poem) as the supreme test of a writer's worth. Orwell was clearly at his most stimulated and inspired as a writer when he had something urgent to say, but having something urgent to say is not always the best attitude to have when you are trying to write a novel. It certainly wasn't the best attitude for Orwell to have when he wrote this one, considering that when he wrote it he was really beginning to find his vocation as a political writer and that he was also (at the time) impressed and intimidated by the example of Joyce's 'Ulysses', which he'd just read. 'Ulysses' has a political dimension, but it is the work of a very different kind of writer. The result is a fascinating and disjointed mish-mash of a novel, and Orwell knew it; even while he was writing it, he was writing to friends to say that he was making a mess of it.

In spite of this, any fan of Orwell will have a soft spot for 'A Clergyman's Daughter', if only because it's this writer's most conspicuous failure. Some of it, the depiction of the heroine's awful and cramped life as the daughter of a snobbish and mean-minded clergyman, plus the vivid accounts of hop-picking and teaching in a cheap and nasty school, are unforgettable. Against that, you have to cope with the fairly implausible story (why and how does Dorothy lose her memory?), the shallow characterisation and the fairly woeful 'experimental' chapter in which Dorothy attempts to spend a night among the homeless in Trafalgar Square, the whole thing rendered as a clunky pastiche of a chapter in 'Ulysses'.

Orwell tried to digest his own personal experiences into fictional form, and in this case he failed.
Read more ›
2 Comments 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback