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Cincinnati Kid [Blu-ray] [1965] [US Import]

4.7 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

Price: £13.31 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
In stock on September 1, 2016.
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£13.31 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details In stock on September 1, 2016. Order it now. Sold by Fulfillment Express and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Frequently Bought Together

  • Cincinnati Kid [Blu-ray] [1965] [US Import]
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Total price: £32.67
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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004OBQDHU
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 48,667 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

An upstart card shark has a marathon game with the king of stud poker in 1930s New Orleans. Directed by Norman Jewison.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
It has been at least a couple of decades since I last saw this film and it is just as good as when I saw it last. To my mind the casting is unbeatable and the film is a classic of the first order. To gain a real insight into how the thing was put together I recommend the version with commentary. Of the three possible endings, finishing at the card table gets my vote. If you like McQueen and enjoy a hand of poker this is definitely one for the collection.
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Format: Blu-ray
this blu-ray is region free with plenty of optional audio and subtitle choices.the extras are very good with a director's commentary,vintage featurette and scene specific breakdown by two poker experts.The picture quality is excellent and the audio though only available in DTS-HD Mono is equally good with nice clear dialogue and punchy soundtrack.For fans of Steve McQueen,Edward G. Robinson or Karl Malden this is an essential purchase.
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Format: Blu-ray
Steve McQueen and Edward G. Robinson are in fine form here as two poker players back in 1930s New Orleans -- Robinson is Lancey Howard, the acknowledged old master of the game, and McQueen is Eric Stoner, the eponymous "Kid" who wants to knock him off his pedestal, and the climax is the game in which both players go all in, as it were, in the final hand. Both are, in different ways, supremely self-assured, and the tension in the movie is built up with remarkable effectiveness, despite the fact that most of the action is sedentary. Little sub-plots generate some separate tensions -- one involves an attempt to rig the game by a wealthy New Orleans player named Slade (Rip Torn), who deeply resents Howard for having defeated him, and another focuses on an attempt to seduce the Kid by Melba (Ann-Margaret), the dissatisfied wife of the Kid's friend Shooter (Karl Malden) -- but their interest dissipates well before the climactic poker session. Jack Weston, Joan Blondell, and Cab Calloway have cameos as poker aficionados, and the movie does a good job making sure, without awkwardness, that any non-poker players in the audience will know what's going on and what's at stake. Both Robinson and McQueen also do a good job of conveying the mental and, for the older man, physical stress of sitting and concentrating, and we do wonder if either is, in some sense, going to crack under the strain. Neither does, but somebody still has to lose . . .

It's a good-looking movie. The opulent interiors of some hotels and Slade's home are well filmed, and they say something about what was possible during the depression for certain kinds of enterprising men. The opening, with its New Orleans funeral under the title credits, is a great idea, and Ray Charles sings an unlikely song as we see these titles.
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By still searching TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 April 2014
Format: Blu-ray
Three years before they made The Thomas Crown Affair together, McQueen first teamed up with Norman Jewison to make, essentially, a `cover' version of Paul Newman's The Hustler. This time, instead of pool we have the kid from the wrong side of the tracks attempting to beat, The Man, Lancey Howard, at his own game, stud poker.

There are various side issues to settle along the way before the kid sits down with the Man and McQueen gets marvelous support from a stunning cast including; the great Edward G Robinson, as Lancey Howard, Karl Malden as the kid's friend, Shooter, Anne Margret as Melba, Shooter's frivolous wife, who also has the kid in her sights, and Joan Blondell, as Lady Fingers. Both Robinson and Blondell were nominated for Oscars in supporting roles.

With a brilliant script by Ring Lardner Jnr, it's scored by Lalo Schiffrin who'd also create the iconic score for Bullitt three years later and the title song is by the equally great Ray Charles; what more could anyone want?

Oh, and unlike with Thomas Crown, the Blu-ray upgrade is definitely worth it; totally stunning!
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Format: DVD
Blah blah blah is the feelings I get when I see comments about this being McQueen's answer to The Hustler, the Newman film is firmly ensconced in the hall of classics and rightly so, but this is a different animal that stands up on its own two feet as a great film regardless of comparisons of leading men or films they respectively delivered.

"It's a pleasure to meet someone who understands that to the true gambler, money is never an end in itself, it's simply a tool, as a language is to thought"

Steve McQueen is The Cincinnati Kid of the title, a young man who has an enviable reputation as the pretender to the throne of king stud poker player. Standing in his way of claiming the crown is the holder of said crown, Lancey "The Man" Howard (a wonderfully sedate yet dominant Edward G. Robinson), both men are in New Orleans for the big showdown across the card table.

The film does suffer slightly from a meandering script, though, because you can't help feeling that there is so much more to these characters that needed fleshing out before the big tense showdown arises. However, the cast and director manage to steer the film home with a glorious final third. Suspense and drama start to boil to the surface, the tight knit editing bringing claustrophobic clarity to the enormity of the game.

McQueen is perfect here, cocky and cool in equal measure, yet still infusing the role with stoic heart and honest endearment. Tuesday Weld & Ann-Margret are playing second fiddle in the acting stakes to a delightful turn from Joan Blondell (a little under used though), but both Weld and Margret bring their respective girls' traits to life, with Margret positively smouldering with femme fatale sex appeal.
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