Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Light shelf wear and minimal interior marks. A tradition of quality and service.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Christmas Pudding (Capuchin Classics) Paperback – 31 Oct 2011

3.9 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 31 Oct 2011
£113.23 £0.01

Top Deals in Books
See the latest top deals in Books. Shop now
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Top Deals in Books
See the latest top deals in Books. Shop now

Product details

  • Paperback: 155 pages
  • Publisher: Capuchin Classics (31 Oct. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1907429212
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907429217
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 347,366 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Nancy Mitford (1904-1973) was born in London, the eldest child of the second Baron Redesdale. Her childhood in a large remote country house with her five sisters and brother is recounted in the early chapters of 'The Pursuit of Love' (1945). She had written four novels including 'Highland Fling' (1931) before the success of 'The Pursuit of Love', and followed it with 'Love in a Cold Climate' (1949) 'The Blessing' (1951) and 'Don't Tell Alfred' (1960). After the war she moved to Paris with her husband where she lived for the rest of her life. Nancy Mitford was awarded the CBE in 1972.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I must admit I'm a huge fan of Nancy Mitford anyway and was thrilled to find this early effort republished. I read it over the Christmas holidays while staying in the countryside, so it all felt very appropriate. This is not life-changing fiction, it's not thought-provoking or even very substantial - it's just a nicely written, witty tale of some very shallow, silly people and a glimpse into the lives of the Bright Young Things many decades ago. It's not for everyone but it was definitely a hit with me!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have recently bought all of Nancy Mitford's novels, and intend to read all eight. Christmas Pudding (1932) follows on from Nancy Mitford's first novel Highland Fling (1931). Some of the same characters appear in both books. I enjoyed the continuation, however Christmas Pudding works perfectly well as a stand-alone novel.

In Christmas Pudding, which, despite the title, contains only a limited amount of Christmassy content, the usual array of colourful aristocratic characters converge in various settings. The younger Bright Young Things displaying their usual mix of homespun philosophy, bored affectation, and commenting on each other's love lives, and other gossip, whilst the older generation do much the same whilst also despairing about the younger generation, declining standards and the dangers of Bolsheviks.

When it's good it's wonderful. At the outset there's a character called Paul Fotheringay who is dismayed by the acclaim for his book. What he thinks is a serious work has been acclaimed as a comic masterpiece. There are other very amusing moments in the book too, and all told it is a light, easy, short and amusing book. As in Highland Fling, the book is best at bringing her various privileged characters vividly to life. At times this feels like reportage.

What I think the book lacks is any commentary or contrast. This is a hermetically sealed world where everyone is immune to the consequences of their actions, and the faceless domestic staff are there to smooth the way ahead. At least with P.G. Wodehouse the servants are given a voice, and also frequently used to highlight the idiosyncrasies (and occasionally the stupidity) of those above stairs. The story is very much told from the centre of Nancy Mitford's world.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Mrs. K. A. Wheatley TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 Aug. 2014
Format: Paperback
This is a very early Mitford novel, and is usually dismissed by critics as being one of her weakest books. I love Nancy Mitford's work, whether it be a collection of letters or her journalism or her novels, so I decided to give it a go anyway. I have to say that I absolutely loved this. It is very, very silly indeed. It owes a lot to Wodehouse, and a bit to Waugh, but it is carried off in Mitford's own inimitable style, and as long as you are happy with very little plot line, a lot of silly jokes and some aristocratic froth it will make you very happy. It did me.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
It's very difficult to try and surmise the comedy of errors of the Bright Young Things of the 1920's and 30's that is Nancy Mitford's `Christmas Pudding' because it as so many different strands to it, but here goes. Paul Fotheringay has written a novel which has not been received by reviewers as he would like, people love it, yet they think it is a highly melodramatic but accomplished farce. In fact it was meant to be a heartbreaking hit based on the bitterness of life and genius that the author believes he has. He has decided that his next work will be a biography of the Victorian poet Lady Maria Bobbins, yet after this is denied he goes undercover thanks to his friend Amabelle's connections with Bobby Bobbins, Maria's grandson and here meets her granddaughter Philadelphia and of course becomes smitten. Amabelle herself has decided to move to the Cotswolds for Christmas, becoming a neighbour of the Bobbins grand house, for a bit of novelty (though she initially finds Mulberrie Farm more novelty than nightmare) and so soon they all become embroiled especially after the arrival of Lord Lewes who was in head over heels in love with Amabelle before soon becoming a suitor for Philadelphia too... only a much more likely candidate in the eyes of society and Lady Bobbins herself.

If it sounds like I have given too much away I honestly haven't because throughout all this there are several other strands, characters and twists to will keep the reader entertained throughout. In fact my one criticism, should I be being rather more lit-crit like, would be that occasionally there are rather too many characters and Bright Young Things (which Mitford seems to give a knowing wink to with names like Bunch, Squibby and Biggy) going on all at once which occasionally takes away from the main events.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback