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Choosing Names: Man-Kzin Wars VIII Mass Market Paperback – 1 Sep 1998

4.6 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 281 pages
  • Publisher: Baen Books (Sept. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671878883
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671878887
  • Product Dimensions: 17.2 x 10.8 x 2.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,015,753 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 11 Jun. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
All good stories, fast moving, with the true feel of Niven's "Known Space". Hal Colebatch, with stories in this and the preceding volume, is a bright new star in SF. His "Telepath's Dance" with its introduction of the Telepaths' War, marks a seminal development in the whole series. There is a lot of subtle humor as well as action. SF as it should be: hard science but an insight into the human condition that has a touch of poetry about it. The Kzin are neither too Alien to be convincing nor too human to be interesting, and the Man-Kzin interface is full of quirks and suspence.
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By A Customer on 24 Mar. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Man-Kzin Wars VII was great, but this is the best so far! Fast moving action, good science. "Telepath's Dance", the longest story, is a classic retelling of "Beauty and the Beast", the Ripley-Alien situation but far stronger. Hints of a rebellion by Telepaths and a remnant of intelligent Kzinretts. Elderly Kzin Admiral almost understands the human secret but just misses the point about them. Good characterisation, laser-battles in space, hints of a developing Man-Kzin empathy. Who could ask for more? All the authors are good and all credit to Larry Niven's masterly control of the series.
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By A Customer on 24 Mar. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Man-Kzin Wars VII was great, but this is the best so far! Fast moving action, good science. "Telepath's Dance", the longest story, is a classic retelling of "Beauty and the Beast", the Ripley-Alien situation but far stronger. Hints of a rebellion by Telepaths and a remnant of intelligent Kzinretts. Elderly Kzin Admiral almost understands the human secret but just misses the point about them. Good characterisation, laser-battles in space, hints of a developing Man-Kzin empathy. Who could ask for more? All the authors are good and all credit to Larry Niven's masterly control of the series.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've been reading Larry Niven since I was a kid, and I still love his stories. Although many tales are now written by other authors, the universe he created is the focus of the stories, and these tales are true to that universe. This most recent collection is a prequel to the earlier books in the series. A human race, brainwashed by political correctness, finds itself defenseless and must "revert" to its older, more primitive ways of thinking in order to save itself. Very entertaining stories.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Choosing Names is a collection of stories covering the early days of the first Man-Kzin War. The stories mainly focus on humans learning to overcome their pacifism. Kzin telepaths are major figures in all but one story. This focus gives the collection a consistent tone, but doesn't provide that much variety. All of the stories are good but none of them match some of the best stories from earlier in the series.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Like most of the other reviewers, I felt this was one of the best of the Man-Kzin series. As mentioned, all of the stories involved telepaths. One of the stories, "Jotok," did not involve humans and the telepath connection was not obvious. Since it was not a Man-Kzin conflict, I wondered why it was in this anthology, although it was certainly a well-done story. I don't suppose there are enough Jotok-Kzin Wars stories to make up a book. This may sound like a complaint, but it isn't. In fact, the more I think about that story, it does serve as background to the Man-Kzin Wars. Another intersting thing about this book is the fact that all the stories involve either first contact between humans and Kzin, or are set early in the first war. That, combined with the Jotok story, which is set very early in the history of the Kzin empire, probably in prehistoric times on Earth, makes this book more of a prequel to the other books in the series. I enjoyed all five stories, and believe any Known Space fans will like it also.
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