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The Chimes of Midnight (Doctor Who) Audio CD – Audiobook, 1 Feb 2002

4.9 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Big Finish Productions Ltd (1 Feb. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1903654580
  • ISBN-13: 978-1903654583
  • Product Dimensions: 14.2 x 1 x 12.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 330,255 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is the twenty ninth release from Big Finish in their range of full cast audio adventures starring classic Doctor Whos. It stars Paul McGann as Eight and India Fisher as Charlotte Pollard. There are four episodes, roughly 25-30 minutes each, complete with original theme music between each, and cliff hanger endings. Two episodes per disc on 2 discs, and a short booklet with some pictures of the cast and production notes.

This release is the second in the second miniseries of Eighth Doc stories, through which there is a loose story arc revolving around Charlotte Pollard's rescue from the R101 by the Doc back in their first adventure. The arc has a greater presence on some stories than others, and here it is quite important.

The Doctor and Charlie arrive in a late Edwardian town house pantry. Things are not as they should be and for some reason they are outside of normal time, and unable to interact with the house or its inhabitants. As the clock chimes they find the barriers weakened, and soon they are plunged into a deep and dark mystery below stairs, where the servants keep getting themselves improbably murdered.

At it's core is a really decent little idea, and it is superbly realised by the cast. India Fisher in particular gets lots to do, and she does it well. Charlie is now starting to lose some of her naivety and grow up a little, and Fisher portrays her journey very nicely. McGann plays Eight as a bundle of energy, having fun but with a deep compassion. And a slight inability to answer some difficult questions...

It's at first a very spooky story, which slowly morphs into something intelligent, moving and thought provoking. 5 stars.
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By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 24 July 2015
Format: Audio CD
This story is a fairly early release in Big Finish’s range, and was released in 2002. The story is a Christmas-themed one, and I felt there were hints of Christmas stories of Dickens and his peers, with the big Victorian-type house, the servants ‘downstairs’ and the gentry ‘upstairs’. And in the middle, the Doctor and Charley, who have landed in the Tardis in a place they can’t quite work out. From landing in the larder, and finding themselves in the kitchen of the old house, the Doctor and Charley find that reality and time seem to not quite be keeping pace here. How can the water in the sink be warm, yet there’s nobody there? How can the broken jar suddenly be back on the shelf in the larder again? When the servants appear, and seem to accept that the Doctor and Charley have a place in the house from ‘upstairs’, both the time travellers feel distinctly uneasy. Where are they? And why are people being murdered?

This is a really good story, written by Robert Shearman. There is a real atmosphere in this story; the old house, with the fire crackling, the creaking doors, the servants who seem so accepting of their places. But the listener knows fairly soon that something is just not right; and can the Doctor find out how to get out before it’s too late? I thought the Eighth Doctor, as played by Paul McGann, and Charley Pollard, played by India Fisher were just great in this story. They have a real rapport and have been very well written here.

The supporting cast were fantastic; with Louise Rolfe as Edith, Lennox Greaves as Shaugnessy, Sue Wallace as Mrs Baddeley, Robert Curbishley as Frederick and Juliet Warner as Mary.
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By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 24 July 2015
Format: Audio CD
This story is a fairly early release in Big Finish’s range, and was released in 2002. The story is a Christmas-themed one, and I felt there were hints of Christmas stories of Dickens and his peers, with the big Victorian-type house, the servants ‘downstairs’ and the gentry ‘upstairs’. And in the middle, the Doctor and Charley, who have landed in the Tardis in a place they can’t quite work out. From landing in the larder, and finding themselves in the kitchen of the old house, the Doctor and Charley find that reality and time seem to not quite be keeping pace here. How can the water in the sink be warm, yet there’s nobody there? How can the broken jar suddenly be back on the shelf in the larder again? When the servants appear, and seem to accept that the Doctor and Charley have a place in the house from ‘upstairs’, both the time travellers feel distinctly uneasy. Where are they? And why are people being murdered?

This is a really good story, written by Robert Shearman. There is a real atmosphere in this story; the old house, with the fire crackling, the creaking doors, the servants who seem so accepting of their places. But the listener knows fairly soon that something is just not right; and can the Doctor find out how to get out before it’s too late? I thought the Eighth Doctor, as played by Paul McGann, and Charley Pollard, played by India Fisher were just great in this story. They have a real rapport and have been very well written here.

The supporting cast were fantastic; with Louise Rolfe as Edith, Lennox Greaves as Shaugnessy, Sue Wallace as Mrs Baddeley, Robert Curbishley as Frederick and Juliet Warner as Mary.
Read more ›
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