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Children of the Revolution: The 21st DCI Banks Mystery Paperback – 16 Jan 2014

4.1 out of 5 stars 559 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (16 Jan. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444704931
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444704938
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (559 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 55,939 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

The Alan Banks mystery-suspense novels are, simply put, the best series on the market (Stephen King)

Robinson's gift for realistic characterisation is matched by an authentically realised sense of place; landscape is a crucial element in his work (Good Book Guide)

A wonderful, well-written plot with a great twist and strong characters . . . a page-turning read (Woman's Way)

A wonderful, well-written plot with a great twist and strong characters and there's even romance on the cards for Banks too. A page-turning read for both fans of Robinson and Banks and readers who really enjoy a good crime-thriller. (Woman's Way)

Peter Robinson deserves a place near, perhaps even at the top of, the British crime writers' league (The Times)

Classic Robinson: a labyrinthine plot merged with deft characterisation (Observer)

Brilliant! . . . Gut-wrenching plotting, alongside heart-wrenching portraits of the characters who populate his world, not to mention the top-notch police procedure. (Jeffery Deaver)

Detective Chief Inspector Banks, the artsy and melancholic Yorkshire detective, and his snarky sidekick, Detective Inspector Annie Cabbot, are consistently fun to watch . . . As usual with a Banks novel, the chief inspector's frictions with higher-ups are nearly as gripping as the unraveling of the case itself. First-rate procedural and character study . . . this is one of the series' highlights. (Starred Review Booklist)

Robinson's gift for realistic characterisation is matched by an authentically realised sense of place; landscape is a crucial element in his work. The Alan Banks books have won many awards over the years including the Arthur Ellis award for best crime novel for Past Reason Hated and the Anthony Award for In a Dry Season; Children of the Revolution is a solid entry. (Good Book Guide)

Book Description

The twenty-first novel in Number One bestselling author Peter Robinson's critically acclaimed DCI Banks series.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

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Couldn't wait to finish this book, not because I was enjoying it, just wanted to move on to something else.
I have read all the Banks books and they were my absolute favourites until the last 2 books.
I totally agree with the reviewer who felt that the character of Banks in the book has been diluted to fit the TV character, who is absolutely nothing like the Banks in the previous books and very difficult to warm to.
The characters we had come to know, seemed mere shadows of their former selves, with no real substance, but lots of fairly boring padding on issues which were not always relevant to the story.
Would a senior police officer really have visited someone they were fairly certain had committed a murder, alone, without any backup?
Whilst I appreciate it must be difficult to maintain the very high standard of earlier Banks books, this was disappointing and probably my last Banks.
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I've read every one of the Banks novels to date, and enjoyed most of them. They did go through a bit of a slump a few years ago, but seemed to revive somewhat thereafter. But, oh dear, this one is absolutely awful. Things that, in moderation, helped previously to flesh out Banks' character, now settle into an unremitting stream of wordy introspection of regrets from the past, resignation in the present and little hope for the future, all liberally sprinkled with a never-ending catalogue of favourite music tracks and alcoholic beverages! There is absolutely no action, just one lengthy chapter after another of conversations, discussions and interviews. I know that Robinson can still write ('Before the Poison' is excellent), but DCI Banks appears to be on his last legs. If you haven't yet discovered the 'Roy Grace' novels of Peter James, now is the time!
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This is the first time I have written a negative comment but was so disappointed with this book. I am a fan of Peter Robinson's books and have read all the previous Alan Banks stories so looked forward to the latest instalment. To put it simply, this book felt like it had been written by someone else, maybe the script writer for the TV series which is awful. Alan Banks has had a personality transplant: where is his caring, self questioning personality? His life and family outside work was mentioned in short, factual sentences but there was no emotion or feeling. He was more aggressive with witnesses and suspects with little balance. This was so the case with Annie Cabbot, again she read like a different person.

While I have really enjoyed this series of books maybe it would be better to call it a day than continue in this vein
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Peter Robinson's new DCI Banks novel is an exemplary study of investigative detective work into Gavin Miller, a 59 year old desperate man who has plummeted from a bridge onto a disused railway line. A post-mortem showed signs of a scuffle before death. He had £5,000 of untraceable notes in his pocket. No motives or forensic evidence apparent. DCI Banks is behind his formidable team of detectives Annie Cabbot, Geraldine (Gerry) Masterson and physically imposing Winsome Jackson.

With little to go on the team are determined to unravel the death that reeks of murder. Tracing the background of Miller opens a can of worms stretching back to Essex University in the early 1970's during the miners' strike and their flying pickets. His latter role as a lecturer at Eastvale College where he was disgracefully dismissed for sexual allegations are relevant. The connections of Miller are the crux of the novel. His involvement with prominent titled figures, notably Lady Veronica Chalmers (known as Ronnie) who was at University with Miller is an interesting find. She is now married to an influential theatrical producer who is wealthy, influential and they have relatives with high political ambitions.

The author spins a fine web of deception and intrigue with his stylish narrative and prose accompanied by cracking dialogue. It starts with a straightforward investigation but cleverly involves many characters who are not who they seem, hiding numerous secrets for personal reasons, with Miller the maltreated individual. The female detectives are remorseless and thorough in their pursuit of the truth and justice despite the reticence of their interviewees with Banks taking a laid back presence but always in charge, directing and controlling proceedings.
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I am a great fan of Peter Robinson's earlier books such as 'The Summer That Never Was' and 'Friend Of The Devil' which are beautifully written and give a good sense of place and time, so this comes as a profound disappointment. There is little of the complex plotting and detailed descriptions of his previous work; instead we have undeveloped characters (even Annie and Winsome are one dimensional here) and an unlikely plot, with a vast amount of the book being taken up with endless speculation about whodunnit, often on the weakest of evidence. I genuinely found it difficult to finish and really did not care what happened in the end. If you are new to Peter Robinson start with the books mentioned above, not this one; you won't be disappointed.
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