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Charley's War: 17 October, 1916-21 February, 1917 Hardcover – 20 Oct 2006

4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd; 1 edition (20 Oct. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845762703
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845762704
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 1.3 x 30.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 291,859 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Timelessly relevant and well researched, this is a comics classic." - PW "Charley's War is one of the finest, most fondly remembered comic strips ever, a deeply radical, horrific reimagining of WWI." - Uncut"

About the Author

Pat Mills has written countless comics stories, including 2000 AD's Judge Dredd, Slaine and A.B.C. Warriors, as well as earlier classics like Charley's War. He also created Marshal Law. Joe Colquhoun worked on a large volume of titles in his 30 year career in the UK comics industry, including Lion, Champion, Buster and Battle. He is probably best remembered for his work on Battle, including Johnny Red and Charley's War.


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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I have just recieved the third installment of the masterpiece that is Charley's war and I now realise as an adult that this story was wasted on me as a child. The writing by Pat mills surpasses anything in comics before or since, never has a story had so many characters that you truly felt were people you knew and if they were real you would love to have them join you for a pint in your local obviously the characters like Captain Snell is excluded. As a child Joe Colquhoun was my hero and I spent hours copying his work and only now nearing fourty do I realise what a master artist he really was. In his notes in this third installment Mr Mills picks a certain frame and says it is the perfect movie image, well I agree but I also think you can pick any frame and apply the same idea so incredibly detailed is Mr Colquhoun's work.

Truly the writing and it's attention to historical facts and the artwork and it's incredible attention to detail surpass anything in my opinion that has ever been published in comics.

If you have never experienced Charley's war do yourself a favour and buy parts 1, 2 and three today.
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By GEH on 20 Dec. 2006
Format: Hardcover
About 20 years ago I used to read "Battle" comic. Looking back on it now, my memories of the majority of the stories have merged into a generic war mush with the usual lantern-jawed tough heros, forgettable daring-do plots with the usual last minute escape against the odds and the wholesale extermination of hundreds of anonymous enemy forces... with the exception of "Charley's War". I always read it first.

The quality of the writing, the detail of the drawings and obvious level of research undertaken elevated it above the other stories in the comic. When I heard that the series was being published I felt that I wanted to read it again. I don't collect comics, or graphic novels. I haven't read (or probably ever will read) the Batman Dark Knight or Watchmen novels. However Charley's War is stunning. I have bought all three of the Titan books and hope that they will continue to publish the rest of the series, which I believe takes Charley up to WW2. I will be buying the next books as and when they are published.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Charley's War continues in to its third volume. If you havent read or seen Charley's war then you should, its a brilliantly conceived introduction to the horrors of the First World War trenches originally shown in the war comic Battle.

In this volume Charley is fighting the German Judgement Troopers during their counter offensive on the Somme, the battle eventually grinds to halt, Charley is wounded and he is sent home on leave to London in time for a German airship air raid on the East End of London

Although this was orginally aimed at children in the Battle comic it appeals to adults too with its strong anti-war message and as a teacher I have used it in classes about World War one to great success.

I do wish that Titan would publish more than one volume a year though, its very frustrating waiting a year for the next one to come out, I'm sure they could easily do two a year! Please Titan, pulbish more, quicker!

Read this book! It really needs 10 stars, its unique.
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Format: Hardcover
Although this book is not out yet I am fortunate to have the original comic books. This volume should conclude the Somme story and take the war to the streets of London. If you brought the first 2 volumes then this is a must....if you did'nt then buy all 3!!! Well done Titan for continuing the series and please don't stop (infact could you rush them out a little quicker!!)
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Format: Hardcover
I know lots of people rightly wax lyrical about this long-running strip. The artwork and the writng are first-class, and the duo behind Charley's War deserve full marks for getting such an 'anti-war' strip into a boys pro-war comic.

However, there's the rub. While masses of historical research went into it, the strip is definitely written from a left-wing perspective. If you've seen the play or film version of 'Oh What a Lovely War' you'll know what I mean.

Officers are almost always upper-class toffs - who dine on good food in comfortable dugouts or billets while their men shiver in the trenches. The few good officers there are, are either cut down by the Germans - or end up ruthlessly sacrificed by the 'political-military' elite. Clearly that's how some people still see World War 1. There is no light or shade...

The trouble is, if you read the diaries of soldiers at the front (and I don't mean the World War 1 literature from the late 20s/early 30s like Rupert Graves "Goodbye to All That") you'll see a much richer and diverse picture.

Many ordinary soldiers felt at the time that the war had to be fought. Many officers in the British army actually came up from the ranks - sorry I know the strip would like to tell you all officers were toffs - but it just wasn't so. Soldiers in the main felt they were fighting for their country, because however appalling the war was - it had to be won.

Was it a disaster for European civilisation that the war happened? Of course it was. Were the huge sacrifices wasted by the country they come home to? Yes they were. After all, Britain had to go to war with Germany again 20 years later.
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