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Channel Orange Explicit Lyrics

4.4 out of 5 stars 101 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (18 July 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • Label: Mercury
  • ASIN: B008CNG52O
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (101 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 338 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Digital Booklet: Channel Orange
Digital Booklet: Channel Orange
Album Only

Product Description

Product Description

Debut studio album by the Brit Award winning American neo soul artist. The album peaked at #2 in the UK and includes the singles 'Thinkin Bout You', 'Pyramids' and 'Sweet Life'. Guest performers include Earl Sweatshirt, John Mayer, Tyler, the Creator and André 3000.

BBC Review

Two weeks ago, many knew very little about Frank Ocean. The New Orleans-born RnB singer had kept a relatively low profile as a member of the controversial Odd Future collective. A quiet outlier, he scored notable collaborations with Jay-Z and Kanye West, yet managed to breach popular culture without making much noise.

Now, it’s virtually impossible for Ocean to go unnoticed. His recent sexual revelation sent shockwaves through the internet, and his television debut on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon catapulted the young crooner into mainstream allure. The magnitude of Ocean’s channel ORANGE, his major label debut, can no longer be ignored.

Given the hype, some may be expecting the second coming of Thriller. Instead, channel ORANGE is a meditative voyage through Ocean’s innermost thoughts, no matter how intangible the topics.

Crack Rock, for instance, warns against the pitfalls of cocaine usage. Super Rich Kids, its beat evoking Elton John’s Bennie and the Jets, is a nonchalant depiction of young affluence. Here, Ocean shares the spotlight with fellow Odd Future member Earl Sweatshirt: “Too many joyrides in daddy’s Jaguar / Too many white lies and white lines.”

Ocean conveys his messages with an innocent zeal, displaying a youthful expression that’s equally reserved and mischievous. On Bad Religion, he bemoans unrequited love. “We’re spending too much time alone,” he says emphatically on Sierra Leone, “and I just ran out of Trojans.” Such statements, set against silky electro-soul compositions, will undoubtedly draw comparisons to Prince.

Except that’s unfair within the context of this project. Ocean’s inflection is more Musiq Soulchild than Purple One, although his voice is more textured and his sound a bit broader. Pink Matter, which nods to early-80s funk, is woozy and downright seedy, but it’s supposed to be that way. His lyrics are equally disjointed as he ponders everything from cotton candy to aliens amid a wafting guitar and ghostly howls.

In the end, channel ORANGE is a direct reflection of its maker. There are moments of assured clarity, juxtaposed with flashes of childlike shyness. What remains is a solid collection of pop-soul renderings through which Ocean tries to find himself. We get to watch his maturation, growing pains and all.

--B007RITZK4

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Red on Black TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 July 2012
Format: MP3 Download
By the time Frank Ocean made his recent broadcast television debut on the Jimmy Fallon show performing the epic "Bad Religion" the secret was out and so was Frank. His admission in a recent letter on tumbir.com that he was bi-sexual finally dragged hip hop with its often vicious homophobia screaming into the 21st century and hopefully the whole horrible façade of hyper-masculinity associated with the genre crumbles with it. What is as important as Ocean's letter is the fact that he has talent to spare and then more, as such "Channel Orange" sees the birth of a new and potentially huge star.

"Channel Orange" is much more than a hip hop album. It fits easily into an R&B framework and within its grooves are jazz, soul and rapping. It also is interspersed with musical fragments and interludes alia Kanye West (who Ocean has recorded with) where ideas literally spill over. The recent review in the Observer accurately describes an album where "beats run on after melodies recede, lonely guitars twang away in the margins, soundscapes overlap. The album, like the mixtape, is broken up with bursts of radio static, fragments of conversation, juddering tape-deck click". And yet at the core of Ocean's work are great songs. The sumptuous R&B ballad "Thinkin bout you" brings a huge burst of summer sun shining brightly into the dour pre Olympic grey of a British summer. The best days of Stevie Wonder are recalled on the pulsating beauty of "Sweet Life" one of the albums standouts where Ocean's vocals are at their best and throughout you can hear traces of other greats such as Al Green, Prince and Marvin Gaye. As with these artists Ocean is not afraid to tackle social issues.
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Format: Audio CD
Right we all know the story of the letter that Frank posted up on tumblr so lets just forget about that for a few moments and actually focus solely on the music and the fantastic album we have before us.

For starters with an album of 17 tracks, Frank really is spoiling us. One thing that is obvious right from the start of listening to Channel ORANGE is that the production quality here is simply fantastic and is something that many other R'n'B artists really lack. It is no secret that Frank has always been a quality producer and composer but Channel ORANGE really shows off just how good he is and I can tell you that taking some time out and listening to this through a good pair of headphones is more than worth it.

Right onto the music itself. The format of Channel ORANGE is similar to that of his 2011 mixtape Nostalgia, Ultra whereby the tracks are often broken up by the sound of computer games and the sound of a skipping tape. The first real track is Thinkin Bout You which has been around for a while and is an excellent start to the album and it is easy to see how it relates to Frank 'coming out' earlier this year. The next three tracks are fairly standard Frank Ocean tracks but that doesn't mean that they are poor songs they are actually still of greater quality than most R'n'B singers around these days. The next standout track is Super Rich Kids which is another fantastic mix of quality production with clever lyrics and a verse from Earl Sweatshirt which will continue to grow on you I can guarantee it. Next up are Pilot Jones and Crack Jones which are two excellent chilled out tracks.

Pyramids is really where the album goes to another level! A 10 minute masterpiece which needs to be heard rather than me describing it which would just not do it any justice.
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I discovered this artist via a very positive review on the Guardian and I have not been disappointed. It is by far the best record of the genre I have heard for years. Franck Ocean has managed to deliver an album that hits the delicate balance between strong lyrics and suave instrumentals. I am particularly fond of the tracks Crack Rock, Pyramids and Lost. For once I can say the hype was justified.
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Simply put the album is as good as you can get from an RnB work of art. Stand out tracks include the soulfull feelgood vibe of "Thinking Bout You", the head-bopping funk of "Super Rich Kids" the epic journey of "Pyramids" and then "Bad Religion and Pink Matter.
The rest of it, while not as good, or at least slow growers, aren't merely just fillers. They all contribute to the album.
It's not the kind of thing I would like normally but like NERD'Fly or Die, I've found myself strangely addicted to it.
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There are already plenty of fans and critics discussing this artists sexuality, bravery, innovation etc and i'm going to try my level best not to add another hum-drum write up obsessing over all the familiar bases. instead i'll try to focus exclusively on how much i've enjoyed listening to this above any questions as to whether Mr Ocean is in fact the most talented member of Odd Future, the saviour of R&B, or potentially the best singer songwriter of this up and coming generation.

Channel Orange is said by some to be a loose concept album of a twentysomethings experience of living in LA, juxtaposing the glamour and the debauchery that runs through the heart of the cities wealthy inhabitants. In truth i think it's much closer to a collection of quasi love songs that are segued with clever observations and insights into our protaganists area of residence. As i'm sure you already know this is largely an R&B or as some prefer "Neo Soul" album, however it's not a typical one persay featuring more left of field instrumentation with old school charm; you can hear funky keyboards, sytnhesizers, soft rock drumming and abstract interludes throughout the 17 tracks on here.

Which brings me serendipitously to "Pyrimaids" easily the most ambitious song on channel Orange, featuring a suite of constantly changing ideas that range from boom bap soul to synthy psychedelia with enviable ease It's scope is a little like Kanye's similarly impressive Runaway from MBDTF. My personal favourites though are "Super Rich Kids" and "Bad Religion" the former featuring an inspired verse from the previously AWOL wonderkind rapper Earl and Frank Ocean's astutely disparaging lyrics detailing the disillusioned perceptions of the rich youth of Los angeles.
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