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The Chambers Dictionary (10th Ed) Hardcover – 4 Sep 2006

4.8 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 1872 pages
  • Publisher: Chambers; 10 edition (4 Sept. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0550101853
  • ISBN-13: 978-0550101853
  • Product Dimensions: 27.3 x 18.7 x 6.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 191,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

It's official! The word techie--a devotee of or expert in (some aspect of) technology--has made it into the Chambers Dictionary. And there are a slew of other net-specific words too, including netiquette, browsing, applet, span, cybersex and cybercafé. It just goes to show how the world of computing and electronic communications has advanced and changed our world. Of course, there are also those other little things that have become part of our lives: Prozac, sound bite, cellulite... --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review

Chambers is my dictionary of choice and always has been, because its

practice is to detail a word's etymology with clarity, brevity and

exactness, so that to look up a word in Chambers is to be able to

unpack its meaning and also to marvel at its compactness... Chambers is

an open door to words at their wittiest, most rooted, most reavealing

and most powerful.

(Ali Smith)

It's good to see that the latest, 11th, edition of Chambers Dictionary has lost none of its wit. (Mark Sanderson, Literary Life, Telegraph.co.uk)

It's official! The credit crunch has finally found its way into the hallowed columns of this iconic work of reference...

Hats off, incidentally, to the editor who archly defines 'comfort food' as 'mood-enhancing food that meets the approval of one's taste buds but not of one's doctor'.

(Daily Echo)

Chambers is the one I keep at my right hand (Philip Pullman: how I chose my top 40, 'The Times') --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I wanted to find out the meaning of the word "mommet" that crops up in Hardy's "Tess of the Durbevilles". I looked through increasingly large versions of the Oxford English Dictionary, and only found it eventually in the two-volume Shorter Oxford. However, when I turned to my Chambers Dictionary, it was right there.
The point being, Chambers' style of categorising words under similar roots allows it to cram far more into a single volume. If you want lots of words, rather than long, encyclopaedic and often repetitious, definitions, go for Chambers.
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Format: Hardcover
The ultimate single volumed dictionary. This is the only dictionary you'll ever need: invaluable for all crossword and scrabble lovers. Don't be misled into buying the Chambers 21st Century Dictionary, it's not as good as this one! Every home should have one very good dictionary and if you want one to serve you well for life then get this!
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Format: Paperback
The Chambers is the best available source of obscure dialect words, obsolete words from Spencer et al, and senses of ordinary words that have long been forgotten. It is this comprehensiveness that has made it the cruciverbalist's bible, particularly for crosswords of the more fiendish variety.
Qua dictionary, though, it is awkward to use compared to the various Oxford dictionaries (the Concise Oxford Dictionary, the New Oxford Dictionary of English, and the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, in order of size). Moreover, the famously amusing definitions are far and few.
In short, buy this dictionary if you have to - i.e., if you while away your time solving (or setting) crosswords, or if you delight in our language's paths less trod. Otherwise, your best one-volume bet is probably the New Oxford Dictionary of English.
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Format: Hardcover
Ever since my grammar school days I have used only Oxford dictionaries. Purchasing the Chambers
makes me feel like I am having an affair with another. Is the Chambers worthy of the risk of a
long-lastig crisis of conscience?
Well, it is a very large tome. A tome with a ribbon marker; something which neither my Shorter
Oxford nor Concise Oxford have. More cabin baggage-on-a-trolley format than the Concise Oxford's
briefcase format.
The page layout is modern - the use of a san-serif font gives the page an uncluttered look. The
headwords are printed in bold letters and the rest in normal letters. The Concise Oxford uses a
serif font for the definitions, which I find better.
None other than Melvyn Bragg wrote a short Foreword. It is quite interesting, but one does get the
feeling that it is doing more to promote his book about the history of English than sing the praises
of the Chambers 9th.
Pronunciation is indicated by a system of respelling which, if you are used to the phonetic
alphabet, may be a problem. If, like me, the phonetic alphabet was the problem, the system of
respelling will come as a blessing.
The encyclopeadic content of some other dictionaries is more or less absent. The Oxford Paperback
English Dictionary has an entry about Stephen Leacock which you will not find in Chambers.
Similarly, you will not find usage panels with helpful hints and tips. I guess this is a dictionary
for advanced adults who rarely need guidance.
One of the selling-points of the Chambers is the coverage of older English words. I have not
checked to see how many there are. I normally grab the Shorter Oxford if I need to look up an
obscure word.
Now for some negative stuff.
Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent dictionary and certainly the most useful for crosswords and Scrabble. My only complaint is not with the book itself but the Amazon description. This is Not a Thumb Indexed version but merely has a ribbon marker to keep your place with. If you are not concerned with the ribbon marker, I'd recommend you buy the cheaper version, save a fiver or so and use your own book mark as I would have done had I not been mislead by this description.
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Format: Hardcover
This is one great dictionary. Although not perfect (especially in persistant use of semicolons for sense differentation - here Oxford Dictionary of English is definitely more user-friendly) the Chambers Dictionary 10 ed. is definitely worth buying for its unbelievable richness of words. There are no encyclopedic entries but that only makes more room for new and specialized vocabulary. Still, I'd advise getting one more dictionary of this size like ODE, for comparison and as mentioned above for more user-friendly layout of the entry. I own both of these and I can say they complement each other perfectly
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Format: Paperback
I've used Chambers for more than forty years and love it with a passion. I still pick it up and read it from time to time, once a week at least. If you think these two points qualify me to be sectioned, all I can say is you can't have had the use and pleasure out of it that I have. It has answered so many what-does-that-mean questions, and helped with so many crossword queries, and brought up so many obscure words for scrabble....... Try it.
I think Oxford has more or less abandoned the territory to Chambers - I mean, of one-volume, comprehensive, practical, day to day dictionaries. (The Concise seems to me to have gone downmarket, so to speak). But, of course, if what you're after is the definitive etymology, the history of the use of the word, the widest range of meanings over its history, then I think you're bound to go to the Shorter Oxford or the OED itself. But then, that's work
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