FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Catch That Tiger has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Catch That Tiger Paperback – 1 Jul 2013

3.1 out of 5 stars 73 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£0.01 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: John Blake Publishing Ltd; Reprint edition (1 July 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1782194320
  • ISBN-13: 978-1782194323
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 478,013 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

""Gripping."" --Washington Times

About the Author

Noel Botham is the chairman of the Useless Information Society and the author of several books, including "The Best Book of Useless Information Ever," "The Book of Useless Information," and "The Ultimate Book of Useless Information." Bruce Montague is an actor.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I have just finished reading a book I bought recently on the recommendation of a friend. Now that I have finished it I may have to reconsider his recommendations in future! Catch that Tiger purports to be the true story of the capture of Tiger 131 based on the secret diaries of the man tasked with the hunt by non other than Churchill himself; Major Doug Lidderdale. Taken at face value this is an amazing story of daring do and straight out of the pages of Boys Own. I don't have a problem with a good yarn but I do have a problem if its presented as fact. So is this book fact or fiction, or a mixture of both?

What do we know for certain? Records show that Major AD Lidderdale was the officer commanding No 104 Tanks Workshop REME based near Tunis at the time of 131's capture. The first official documented connection between Lidderdale and Tiger 131 was when the 104th were tasked with supervising the recovery operation on the 7 May, over two weeks after the action in which it was abandoned by its crew. His unit went on to repair and overhaul the captured Tiger so it could be evaluated and filmed for recognition purposes. While still in North Africa the Tiger was visited by several VIP's including Churchill, General Alexander and King George VI. Lidderdale then accompanied the Tiger back to England and was the author of the initial technical report on the tank in November 1943. All of these are accepted and substantiated facts.

The book doesn't dispute these facts but does elaborate and expand them into a tale, which if true, beggars belief and would rank as one of the great true life action stories of WWII.

The central claim is that Lidderdale was personally ordered by Churchill to bag him a tiger.
Read more ›
3 Comments 45 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a piece of crash, bang,wallop of the sort I used to read in Champion! Dreadfully written and with no factual content. The so called conversations with Churchill are comic to the point of imbecility. A complete waste of money.
1 Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Sometimes you come across a book that is so enjoyable, that so fills you with wonder that you immediately want to read it again - this isn't one of them, in fact it's one of those books you wish you had never bought in the first place.
What looks at first glance to be a work of non-fiction is in fact a comic book work of fiction with some fact weaved into it.
This is a book that is authored so badly it makes a Jeffrey Archer novel look like a work of Shakespeare; 'nothing can be that bad!' I hear you exclaim, oh yes it can, and then some.
This garbage was, believe it or not, the Daily Mail 'Book of the Week' and received a rave review in the Daily Express, that says a lot about the quality of the the press in this country and the competence and motives of it's so called journalists (free lunch anyone?).
My condolences to the mugs who paid the full price for this confection, my copy was only 50p from a charity shop, about 49p more than it was worth.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
As my father was there with the Royal Tank Regiment when this famous Tiger was captured it was a book I had to get - what a mistake! Having served in the Royal Tank Regiment myself and having studied this subject all my life, I already have a huge libery of books on military history and particulary tanks. This book will not be joining them on my book shelf as it is pure fiction, written in the style of a novel - and not a very good one at that. It reminded me of the old boys comic books and is full of both historic and technical inaccuracies.
*IMPORTANT*
I have just received the 'Tank Times' from Bovington Tank Museum in which there is an artical about this book. Here is one paragraph:
'The leters that Doug Lidderdale wrote before his death in 1999 would make uncomfortable reading for anyone who accepts the claims made in 'Catch That Tiger'. Because whilst he was heavily envolved in the story of Tiger 131, he clearly admits he wasn't there when it was captured.'
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I read the first few chapters of this book in Waterstone's over the weekend and I would have to say that there were more inaccuracies and pieces of fiction in those few pages than I'd tolerate in the whole of a purportedly factual book of much greater length than this.

For example. According to this book, Hitler's second birthday treat in 1942, following early-morning raunchy rumpy-pumpy with Eva, is to inspect two candidate heavy tank designs. He rejects one because it can only do 2mph and picks the other, made by Herschel. He then gloats over its splendid gun with its shells weighing nearly a tonne each. The trouble with this account is that, with the possible exception of the rumpy-pumpy with Eva, everything in it is factually incorrect.

The rejected Porsche design was turned down because its engine was both troublesome and used excessive quantities of hard-to-source strategic materials. The 90-odd pre-production models of this design already built were converted to tank destroyers instead. Weighing 65 tonnes - 10 tonnes more than the prototype Hitler saw - they were good for 20mph. The claim of 2mph is simply nonsense.

The design selected was made not by "Herschel", but by Henschel. It's not a typo, it is repeated throughout. It's as though one opened a book about the Battle of Britain to find it discussing the RAF's Honker Hurricanes.

The Tiger's shells did not weigh a tonne each. The only shells in use anywhere in 1942 that did weigh a tonne each were the ~2,300lb rounds fired by various types of 16-inch naval gun. The Tiger's gun was of 3.4-inch (strictly, 88mm) calibre, and its round weighed 16lbs. Even if the authors mean that the Tiger's total ammunition loadout of 92 rounds weighed a tonne, they'd still be wrong.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback