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The Cashflow Quadrant: The Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom Paperback – 1 May 1999

4.7 out of 5 stars 93 customer reviews

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Paperback, 1 May 1999
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Product details

  • Paperback: 251 pages
  • Publisher: TechPress Incorporated; New edition (May 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0964385627
  • ISBN-13: 978-0964385627
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 1.7 x 22.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (93 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 394,959 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Robert T. Kiyosaki co-founded an international education company, teaching business to graduates. Now retired, Robert does what he enjoys most.he invests. Sharon L. Lechter is a consultant to the toy and publishing industries, and a business owner --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Repetition is the source of mastery, and The Cash Flow Quadrant takes the excellent thinking in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and builds to another level of detail. This information will increase what you learned in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and help you begin the transformation from a salaried or self-employed person into a business owner and investor.
The definitions of these four quadrants are important. As an employee, you have a job. As a self-employed person, you own a job. As a business owner you have a system (such as a franchise like McDonald's) that produces cash flow for you and others work for you. As an investor, your money works for you. Rich people are getting more than 70 percent of their cash flow and income by having money work for them.
One of the strengths of the book is that it deals with the subtle psychological differences among people in the four different quadrants, especially on subjects like security and freedom. Kiyosaki and Lechter then do a nice job of helping you understand the difference between risky and taking risk. The latter is a good idea, when you know what you are doing, and the former is always to be avoided.
The book is not dogmatic, pointing out that good results can be reached in a variety of ways. You have to decide which ones are right for you. In general, you are encouraged to move from the employee and self-employed side for your income to the business owner and investor side. Then, take your cash flow and expand it into investments.
Another of the strengths of the book is to make it clearer what the advantages of income property are. In these Internet stock-crazed days, many are looking only to stocks and missing good commercial property opportunities.
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Format: Paperback
This is no 'get rich quick manual', and is all the better for it - but it will shift the paradigms of what has become, for most of us, the conventional view of work and money. Written in a similar style to the 'one minute manager' series of books is perhaps the only downside of this wonderful volume. The message is essentially simple and illustrated well by examples and diagrams. If you want to become finacially free and actually have your money work for YOU and not the bank, mortgage lender, or tax-man then invest in buying the book and the time to read it. Then begin the journey to financial freedom. The important points are periodically repeated so as to re-affirm the knowledge, which I think is good for any reader at any level. There are 'get out clauses' that allow the reader to finish the book early if they don't think the philosophy will suit them and so not waste their time. I challenge any one to put the book the book down before the last page!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you like me have read the first book you might become irritated as I did with the repetition in this sequel. Consequently the reading experience wasn't as enjoyable as Rich Dad Poor Dad 1.
There is however some useful information and new concepts in the second book so on balance it's still worth buying.
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Format: Paperback
Repetition is the source of mastery, and The Cash Flow Quadrant takes the excellent thinking in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and builds to another level of detail. This information will increase what you learned in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and help you begin the transformation from a salaried or self-employed person into a business owner and investor.
The definitions of these four quadrants are important. As an employee, you have a job. As a self-employed person, you own a job. As a business owner you have a system (such as a franchise like McDonald's) that produces cash flow for you and others work for you. As an investor, your money works for you. Rich people are getting more than 70 percent of their cash flow and income by having money work for them.
One of the strengths of the book is that it deals with the subtle psychological differences among people in the four different quadrants, especially on subjects like security and freedom. Kiyosaki and Lechter then do a nice job of helping you understand the difference between risky and taking risk. The latter is a good idea, when you know what you are doing, and the former is always to be avoided.
The book is not dogmatic, pointing out that good results can be reached in a variety of ways. You have to decide which ones are right for you. In general, you are encouraged to move from the employee and self-employed side for your income to the business owner and investor side. Then, take your cash flow and expand it into investments.
Another of the strengths of the book is to make it clearer what the advantages of income property are. In these home-purchasing crazed days, many are looking only to buy homes and missing good commercial property opportunities.
Read more ›
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
A fine book that changes the way you think about money. The text can get a little repetetive at times, but don't let that put you off. There's a lot more meat in this book than in his previous offerring, 'Rich Dad, Poor Dad'.
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Format: Paperback
Like the book before it and the ones following, this book is written in a very simple and repetitive fashion. Often the same quotes and statements are reused just pages apart. However, I believe that's exactly what makes it good, for the simple reason that getting rich is not simple, is a long process, and with no sensible short cuts. It requires a solid foundation based on the right sort of intelligence - and that's what this series of books drums into the reader. Furthermore, the fact that there is simply so much to read (if you read the series), gives you the opportunity to digest all the lessons before leaping into action with too much hast.
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