FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Case of the Grave Acc... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Wordery
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: This fine as new copy should be with you within 8-9 working days via Royal Mail. Please note this title is print on demand.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Case of the Grave Accusation: A Sherlock Holmes Adventure Paperback – 27 Jun 2011

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£3.17 £3.84
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 100 pages
  • Publisher: MX Publishing Limited; 1st edition (27 Jun. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1908218819
  • ISBN-13: 978-1908218810
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 0.5 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,676,365 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As it ought to be in a good pastiche, Holmes and Watson are as they use to be in Doyle's stories, and the reader is pleased to meet them again with their typical words and attitudes. It's a very entertaining fiction: Holmes and Watson leave the pages of the stories and appear in contemporary world. They are not only time travelling, but changing their status of made- of- paper creatures to become real human beings. Both of them react according to their nature in front of modern contraptions such as television, desktops and laptops. Their reactions and remarks are quite amusing. The villain is more ridiculous than really fearsome. The whole story is humorous, easy and pleasant to read.
But it is not only fiction. The name of the villain is more or less the translation in French of the genuine name of the man (called by Sir Andrew Mac Farlane an "unreliable historian") who has really accused Sir Arthur Conan Doyle of having stolen "the Hound of Baskervilles" from Bertram Fletcher Robinson (in 2002, I think): "ail" means "garlic", and "la pelure" means "the peel"...The accusations made by Roger la Pelure d'Ail are the same as the real ones: plagiarism, adultery and poisoning.Holmes prove them wrong, one by one, by using observation, deduction but also modern techniques such as forensic tests. Dicky Neely ridicules the author who accused Doyle, but doesn't enter into a fierce controversy. There is no unkindness in his book. After the story itself, we found very interesting documents, which prove that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle fully aknowledged Fletcher Robinson contribution to "the Hound of Baskerville", and that the relations between the two men remained excellent as long as they lived.
I enjoyed this book, which is "fiction AND not fiction", and is both entertaining and instructive. Dicky Neely and Paul Spiring are so kind as to support two good causes: "The Undershaw Preservation Trust" and "A Posthumous Bafta for Jeremy Brett" (last pages of the book)
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Mr. Neely published the main portion of this book in "The Coastal Bend Sun," a defunct Texas newspaper, in 2002. For this book, he made adjustments to the story and added illustrations. Mr. Spiring added a section of comments that summarize the contacts between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Bertram Fletcher Robinson between the publication of "The Hound of the Baskervilles" and Robinson's death.

The basis for this pastiche was a series of allegations by Rodger Garrick-Steele issued in 2000. These were essentially that Doyle plagiarized the Baskervilles story from Robinson and then, when Robinson threatened to `expose' him, Doyle seduced Mrs. Robinson and conspired with her to poison her husband. Of course, these charges caused a minor furor but, eventually, died from a lack of any proof and all the evidence of a continuing friendship between Doyle and Robinson. Mr. Neely wrote the novella in 2002 as a response to these allegations. Mr. Spiring, credited as Editor, compiled and listed a series of citations that indicate the continued long-term good relations between Doyle and Robinson up to the time of Robinson's death in 1907.

The fictional element of this book has Holmes and Watson recalled from honorable retirement as fictional icons to investigate a matter that is vitally important to their existence. This is the charge of plagiarism against Doyle, which cast the entire literature of Sherlock Holmes into doubt. The investigation is carried on in the 21st Century, so Holmes and Watson need to orient themselves and to adapt to the information sources and other technologies available to them in this time and place.

Surprisingly, the investigation is carried out in a typical Sherlockian fashion, with Dr.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Great combination of fiction and fact. Has encouraged me to dig back into the original press around the case from back in 2000.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9168e618) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9373d258) out of 5 stars Anti-plagiarism in Hound book 5 July 2011
By Philip K. Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Mr. Neely published the main portion of this book in The Coastal Bend Sun, a defunct Texas newspaper, in 2002. For this book, he made adjustments to the story and added illustrations. Mr. Spirling added a section of comments that summarize the contacts between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Bertram Fletcher Robinson between the publication of "The Hound of the Baskervilles" and Robinson's death.

The basis for this pastiche was a series of allegations by Rodger Garrick-Steele issued in 2000. These were essentially that Doyle plagiarized the Baskervilles story from Robinson and then, when Robinson threatened to `expose' him, Doyle seduced Mrs. Robinson and conspired with her to poison her husband. Of course, these charges caused a minor furor but, eventually, died from a lack of any proof and all the evidence of a continuing friendship between Doyle and Robinson. Mr. Neely wrote the novella in 2002 as a response to these allegations. Mr. Spiring, credited as Editor, compiled and listed a series of citations that indicate the continued long-term good relations between Doyle and Robinson up to the time of Robinson's death in 1907.

The fictional element of this book has Holmes and Watson recalled from honorable retirement as fictional icons to investigate a matter that is vitally important to their existence. This is the charge of plagiarism against Doyle, which cast the entire literature of Sherlock Holmes into doubt. The investigation is carried on in the 21st Century, so Holmes and Watson need to orient themselves and to adapt to the information sources and other technologies available to them in this time and place.

Surprisingly, the investigation is carried out in a typical Sherlockian fashion, with Dr. Watson manfully but confusedly helping Holmes and a Scotland Yard Inspector providing the necessary back up. The adjustment problems Holmes and Watson face are taken in stride and the `Standard Doyle cast' make guest appearances. The villain of the piece is a fictional character who is nursing several problems along with a need for recognition. He is induced to recant and to channel his energies into more acceptable efforts.

Mr. Spirling's efforts have produced a careful list of public appearances, comments and citations that illustrate the friendly and extended relations that existed between Doyle and Robinson. There are also personal communications, shared events and joint appearances of various sorts that occur all through the period between the publication of The Hound of the Baskervilles and the death of Mr. Robinson. So the thesis that Robinson had become upset with Doyle is contradicted time and again, right up to his last writings before his death.

The book is short, but well done. It will effectively nail the lid onto the coffin of any plagiarism charges against Doyle for using Robinson's local tale as an inspiration for his story. Robinson was fully and completely credited as the source of the `Baskervilles Legend' and used that credit, from time to time, to promote his own career, rather than holding it against Doyle.

Reviewed by: Philip K. Jones, July 2011
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x902916e4) out of 5 stars Premature Burial? 6 July 2011
By George Stevenson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Case of the Grave Accusation: A Sherlock Holmes Adventure
The brilliant pun in the title of this work seems to say it all, considering the accuser wished to have Robinson's body exhumed. Given Mr Spiring's extensive researches into the life of that gentleman, one might wish to have a straight journalistic account of the episode without any interference from Holmes and Watson. But, like the original charge, this probably wouldn't have much substance, and result in an even shorter book. There is evidence, as the writers say, that Doyle and Fletcher Robinson remained friends, or at least in some sort of contact, until the latter's death; and presumably Doyle didn't object when the editor of, for example, 'The Windsor Magazine' referred to 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' every time a tale written by Robinson appeared. And one really must admire the idea of bringing The Great Detective and his 'Boswell' into the twenty-first century, with all its bewildering technology.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback