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on 3 August 2014
I was already a believer at the time of reading but read this out of interest. Presents the information in a logical, evidence based manner which is necessary for people who like me are quite literal-minded and can sometimes find Christianity hard to fathom. The chapter including the crucifixion was very difficult to read and had me in tears but the historical information was fascinating to know. A recommended read
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on 25 September 2013
A wonderful investigative insight into the various foundation stones of the Christian faith. Clear historical perspective is provided concerning both Christ himself and those associated with during those critically important early years and decades which witnessed the birth of Christianity.
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on 25 March 2016
Mr Strobel, this is a good book vitiated, I fear, by one issue that merits, in my view, your anxious consideration.

You assert that Jesus claimed to be God. On the contrary, Jesus constantly referred to God as his father, indicating that Jesus is the son of God--no more and no less. Dr Carson's convoluted attempt to effectively interpret Jesus's unequivocal and unambiguous statement "for the Father is greater than I" (John 14:28) as "the Father is NOT greater than I" amounts, I am afraid, to risible sophistry; God has no equal.

Moreover, Jesus and God are "one" only in the sense that they are of one accord as demonstrated by Jesus's request addressed to God that his disciples "may be one as we are one" (John 17:11, 22). Now, if Jesus is God incarnate, who precisely was he praying to in John 17? Self-evidently, there would be no need for Jesus to pray to God if he is himself God.

Note also in Luke 22:42 that Jesus says "yet not my will, but yours be done", indicating that God's will takes precedence over that of Jesus and that God is indeed greater than Christ. Therefore, God and His son, Jesus, are self-evidently two wholly separate, discrete beings, as further demonstrated in 1 Corinthians 11:3, which states "the head of Christ is God". See also 1 Corinthians 15:27-28, 1 Corinthians 8:6 and Mark 10:18. After all, how can God sit at his own right hand (Psalm 110:1, acts 2:34)? Additionally, Colossians 1:15 states "[Jesus is] the firstborn over all creation." This means Jesus was created by God and therefore had a beginning whereas God has no beginning (Psalm 90:2).

While the historical perspective given by theologians such as Dr Carson are sometimes useful, sight must not be lost of the fact that the scriptures were written by ordinary people for ordinary people, and theologians are not infallible. After all, I suspect we have them to thank for the inquisition and the sell of "indulgencies", among other iniquities, by the Church of Rome.

In conclusion, the son of God cannot simultaneously be God; this is an affront to commonsense. Thankfully, Jesus does not himself, at any stage in the scriptures, require us to make this insuperable leap in imagination; He, as far as I am aware, does not anywhere claim to be god. Therefore, the trinitarian doctrine, adhered to by some (particularly papists) is fataly flawed: there is no such thing as a trinity of equals in the scriptures.

Separately, it’s my view at present that, although it is inspired by God, the Bible is not entirely free from error since its writers were fallible human beings. For example, in Romans 13:3, NIV, Paul states that “For rulers hold no terror for those who do right, but for those who do wrong.” In my view this statement is just as false today as it undoubtedly was in Paul’s times; certainly, the victim’s of Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge or those of Hitler’s third Reich would take vehement exception to it. Are we to understand that these tyrants were instituted by God and that, moreover, their victims brought their fate on themselves? See Proverbs 29:2, NIV.
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on 20 August 2003
Strobel asks the kind of questions I might want to ask of these Bible scholars - but would probably have been to polite to. What can be seen from this is that the most extensive, probing questioning will help the subject present their case all the more convincingly, that is, if it is true.
The book is well-paced. It flows and is gripping. I really didn't want to close the book when I got to the end of a chapter... I wanted to keep reading. Strobel really does get these scholars to explain every angle. Far from being musty, these interviewees are exciting and have a story to tell.
By the end of this book I was in no doubt about the facts and the conclusion they led to. I had gone through the same journey as Strobel; from doubt to faith.
This book is a must-have, whether you are a Christian or not. In fact if you're not, read this book and see if it answers your questions about why you are not. I'm betting it will.
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on 17 November 2015
I haven't actually finished reading this yet, but so far it is excellent. It's written in a very accessible style; so far I can say that he's using a lot of the logic that CS Lewis used, but in a more colloquial style. I would definitely recommend it; it was recommended to me by a relative who had not had a Christian up-bringing and knew absolutely nothing about the BIble, or had misconceived a good bit of what he did know. I think he is now "in the process" of re-thinking his beliefs (or lack of them) probably in no small part because of this book.
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on 17 January 2015
A fantastic book. Ideal for those wishing to know more about Christ (the person, as historically documented) yet the book is written in an easy, interesting and a delightful way. An excellent book and an easy read that cuts to the chase and and is unafraid to ask some serious questions and then reveal some serious and interesting answers. Very educational, enlightening and inspirational. A good book for believers and doubters alike.
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on 3 September 2013
This was fantastic, I think everyone should read it!
There are invaluable points and pieces of evidence in Strobel's journey to discovering Jesus Christ that reiterated what I knew and gave me other things to think about and learn for myself!
I read it in 2 days straight.
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on 28 July 2015
Excellent! For anyone serious about wanting to know who God is..
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on 19 September 2015
I didn't find this that great a book. I've seen lee strobels stuff in the past and found it more worthwhile to save the money and watch one of his videos on YouTube.
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on 21 May 2006
This book is fantastic and well sourced, when I first became Christian I began to wonder about how historical what I believed was and read loads of books, a lot of them very dry academic documents. This book sources them but is a lot more readable. Every assertion Strobel or one of his interviewees makes is backed up by reliable academic material (academic material means that it is peer reviewed, i'm surprised the "scientist" who reviewed below didn't think about this).

I would thoroughly reccomend it, it is well researched and reliable but much more readable than other similar works.
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