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The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC (Elite) by [D'Amato, Raffaele, Salimbeti, Andrea]
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The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC (Elite) Kindle Edition

3.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product Description

Book Description

Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork, this study presents the latest written and pictorial research on the armies of Rome's most dangerous rival, which under the leadership of Hannibal Barca came close to snuffing out Rome's rise before its reach extended much beyond Italy itself.

About the Author

Born in 1962, Andrea Salimbeti has had a life-long interest in ancient military history, in particular the Bronze Age in Greece and the Middle East. He served as a paratrooper in the Italian Army in Beirut and attended the Space Academy and flight training in USA. He now works for the space programme, and is also author of various articles on aerospace technology and flight equipment. His hobbies include modelling military figurines. Dr Raffaele D'Amato is an experienced Turin-based researcher of the ancient and medieval military worlds. After achieving his first PhD in Romano-Byzantine Law, and having collaborated with the University of Athens, he gained a second doctorate in Roman military archaeology. He currently works as vice-head of the Laboratory of the Danubian Provinces at the University of Ferrara, under Professor Livio Zerbini.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 15985 KB
  • Print Length: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (20 April 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00J4ICTSA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #474,459 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a mostly good overview of "the Carthaginians" or, more accurately, of their armies from the 6th to the 2sd century BC, despite some "glitches", which are mostly approximations or simplifications, rather than mistakes. One feature which is quite striking at the outset when looking at the select bibliography is that the authors and the artist have cast a rather wide net. They have listed some 34 "modern works" or secondary sources in English, French, Spanish, German and Italian.

To me at least, it is fairly obvious that they have also researched their topic in depth.
Second, the authors are careful to define quite precisely the scope of their book in their introduction. The purpose is to try "to represent how Carthaginian warriors might have looked, according to the current state of our knowledge based on a comparative synthesis of the main archaeological finds and the iconographic and literary sources." This is what the book achieves, rather well in my view, and this is what the references included in the bibliography mentioned above reflect.

This is where a (mild) criticism may be in order with regards to the bibliography because it contains very few references for further reading for anyone which may have a wider interest than what the "Carthaginian warriors" - which, as the book shows quite clearly were mostly non-Carthaginian mercenaries. In particular, I was expecting to find at least Richard Miles' major book on Carthage ("Carthage must be destroyed", 2010) which, with its 34 pages of bibliography, would by itself have been enough to satisfy even the most dedicated "fan" of Carthage.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A brand new Osprey book (published 2014) well researched by Andrea Salimbeti and Raffaele D'Amato, only marred by poor murky and unattractive illustrations by Giuseppe Rava. The book is slim and quite a lot of space is taken up with photos of rusting helmets or featureless stone figures. None of the usual magnificent action scenes as a guide to the historian & wargamer. The pictures of Carthaginian warriors are badly proportioned and lacking in detail. I expected the graphics to be far superior. Perhaps the Carthaginians did have arms and legs of different lengths or retractable limbs? A great pity the illustrations provide such poor support for the text, which is thorough and detailed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A further study on this Mediterranean Nation that supports and builds upon the previous related Osprey titles. Informative and clear, as most Osprey titles are, and very readable. I only hesitate in not granting a fifth star on a purely personal not, as I am not a fan of the artist's style.
Recommended.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ok, it's just arrived and I have had a quick flip through it. From this initial browse I do have a couple of comments.

Firstly, Andrea Salimbeti and Dr D'Amato seem to know their stuff and the book covers a wide range of topics, from tactics to campaigns. This part of the book seems first rate.

Secondly, I don't like the way Osprey have moved from the format of the colour plates in the middle and spread them about, it makes me feel cheated. I may not be, there may be the same number of plates, but it doesn't seem that way. Of course this isn't the fault of the Authors and it is subjective as others may like the format.

What really lets it down for me are the plates. Now to me, the main thing about the Osprey books are the plates. Across the hundreds of titles I have there are some really lovely illustrations. For example I have the two Seven Year War Russian titles on my desk next to me and Bill Younghusband's illustrations are glorious. Another title is the Mareth Line in the Campaign series, without doubt the best illustrations in any of the Campaign series (although Fall Gelb (1) comes close.... However, the Carthaginians plates are frankly awful and second rate.

Sorry Andrea and Raffaele you have been let down by Osprey and the Illustrator....
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
really informative book
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