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Carthaginian Warrior 264-146 BC Paperback – 10 Sep 2010

3.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (10 Sept. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846039584
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846039584
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 494,114 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

Great illustration by Steve Noon allied to a no-nonsense text you might expect from an impressively qualified historian like Nic Fields. His attention to detail and economy with words combines will with his ability to bring ancient history alive for us throughout. --Miniature Wargames

Book Description

The story of the warriors who fought for Carthage, the Semitic superpower that clashed with Rome in a series of three epic wars (264-241 BC, 218-201 BC, and 149-146 BC).

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is another Osprey title on Carthaginian armies, but this time in the Warrior series and with coverage limited to the time of the Punic Wars.

The contents are somewhat similar to the more recent title just published by Salimbeti, d’Amato and Rava, although they are also a number of interesting differences that make the two titles complementary rather than redundant.

This title, in particular, insists upon what it meant to be a mercenary soldier and barely scraping a living with pay which was at best irregular and allowances for food which were barely sufficient. It also shows how and why Carthage, which at least initially seems to have relied on an army made up of first-class (the Carthaginians from Carthage) and second-class citizens (the levies of the so-called “Libyan-Phoenicians” subjects or “Africans”) switched to an army made up almost entirely of levies from subjects and mercenaries from around the Mediterranean, except for the senior officers and some of the heavy cavalry. Nic Fields clearly outlines the main reasons, which were about economics with the Carthaginians conducting war like a business and wanting to preserve their citizens’ lives which anyway were not very numerous and may have been largely used to make up the crews of the fleet.

Another merit of this title is to devote quite a lot of space to discussing the recruitment, the living conditions and the mentality and psychology of these mercenaries, as far as we can grasp these elements. One particularly interesting insight is to show to what extent these professional soldiers’ loyalty would go to their comrades in arms and, to the extent that they were both competent and charismatic, to their leaders, as evidenced with the Barcas (but also by a few others).
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Thankfully, a relative wealth of knowledge about Rome and its armies has come down to us today. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said of Carthage and its military. It is no surprise, therefore, that textbooks about Carthaginian soldiers are as rare as hen's teeth. There simply isn't much information to be had. Frustrating, but there it is.

In my opinion, this new volume from Osprey does well in laying out what is known in a presentable, understandable way. We are told the reasons for Carthage's armies being made up primarily of levies or mercenaries rather than citizens. The areas from which the soldiers came. Their weapons, equipment food and pay. What made a man become a mercenary, and what it might have been like.

As ever in Osprey books, the illustrations (by Steve Noon) are excellent. The picture on the cover, of the Spartan general Xanthippos addressing his Carthaginian troops, is particularly good. It's a shame that there weren't more! For those who are interested, there are some excellent illustrations of Carthaginian soldiers in Warfare in the Classical World, which is a top class text in itself.

My only gripe with this volume was that it felt frustrating reading about Carthaginian soldiers under the various heading of weapons, equipment etc. rather than giving each class of soldier their own section which would have described everything about that particular type of warrior.

Ben Kane, author of Hannibal: Enemy of Rome.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a keen military modeller, I am always on the lookout for new pictorial information for my hobby. The script was interesting although most of it was already common knowledge. The illustrations are completely useless for people looking for more combat ready troop illustrations. Extremely disappointing. N.C.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars What else did you expect? 1 Oct. 2013
By HAZ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Likes:
The plates which depict the soldier types and dress are well done.
Good general info ranging from weapons and armaments to food and pay.

Dislikes:
As with all the Men at Arms Series books, there are only 8 plates shown in the book so if you are looking for a wide range of pictures to help with painting miniatures or other games, there are other more illustrated books out there.
This book goes into great detail about the mercenaries that Carthage used but only has a few pages dedicated to their own (native) men and units. I learned more from the picture on the front cover than I did looking through the book in that regard.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 27 Feb. 2015
By SpecOps - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book assisted me in my writing my paper in Seminar's class in college.
4 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Carthaginian Warrior 264-146 BC 22 Oct. 2010
By Michael E. Stiles - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I rated this book at three stars due to its mediocrity. I have found that you really must purchase all three books concerning Carthage and the Carthaginian warriors to obtain a decent overview of the Carthaginian Army. None of them deal deeply into history before the Romans came onto the scene. Everything dealing with the Punic Wars is well documented in a 'he went here and did this, then rested' type of way. However, I do recommend purchase of this book for any indepth studies.
5.0 out of 5 stars Bal Hamon be praised! 24 May 2017
By Becky2000 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Information about the armies of Carthage is very slim (blame the Romans), so it's hard not to be happy about this well-written and engaging book. One thing you'll notice is that the book deals very little with actual Carthaginian warriors (though it does talk a good deal about Carthaginian generals), and focuses more on the famous mercenary part of Carthage's armies.

I assume that this focus on the mercenaries is for two reasons: 1) There just isn't much surviving information about how the Carthaginians equipped and trained themselves, or how they fought. When you're dealing with a civilization that's been dead for over two thousand years, and whose destroyers did everything they could to eradicate as much of their history and culture as possible, this is sadly inevitable. 2) Mercenaries did indeed make up a large part of many Carthaginian armies. While the Carthaginians themselves manned their fleets, they used their vast wealth to hire the best foreign warriors and soldiers they could find and sent them into battle under the command of native Carthaginian generals. After all, if your civilization has the cash but doesn't have a great warrior culture, why not pay someone else to defend your lands and kill your enemies?

I definitely recommend this book. As someone who isn't particularly well-versed in the subject, I've learned a great deal about not just Carthage, but ancient mercenaries in general from it. It gave me more than I'd hoped for about one of history's great lost civilizations, and for that I salute the author. Bal Hamon be praised!
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A long overdue title arrives 18 Nov. 2010
By Ben Kane - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Thankfully, a relative wealth of knowledge about Rome and its armies has come down to us today. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said of Carthage and its military. It is no surprise, therefore, that textbooks about Carthaginian soldiers are as rare as hen's teeth. There simply isn't much information to be had. Frustrating, but there it is.

In my opinion, this new volume from Osprey does well in laying out what is known in a presentable, understandable way. We are told the reasons for Carthage's armies being made up primarily of levies or mercenaries rather than citizens. The areas from which the soldiers came. Their weapons, equipment food and pay. What made a man become a mercenary, and what it might have been like.

As ever in Osprey books, the illustrations (by Steve Noon) are excellent. The picture on the cover, of the Spartan general Xanthippos addressing his Carthaginian troops, is particularly good. It's a shame that there weren't more! For those who are interested, there are some excellent illustrations of Carthaginian soldiers in Warfare in the Classical World, which is a top class text in itself. In my opinion, it's also necessary to read Armies of the Carthaginian Wars.

My only gripe with this volume was that it felt frustrating reading about Carthaginian soldiers under the various heading of weapons, equipment etc. rather than giving each class of soldier their own section which would have described everything about that particular type of warrior.

Ben Kane, author of The Forgotten Legion.
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