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The Carpet People Hardcover – 15 Nov 1971

4.5 out of 5 stars 84 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 15 Nov 1971
£349.99

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Colin Smythe Ltd; First Edition edition (15 Nov. 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0900675497
  • ISBN-13: 978-0900675492
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (84 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,316,560 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Only a writer with a masterstroke of imagination could place an entire empire of goodies and baddies within the fronds of a carpet. "Daily Mail" Brilliantly funny dialogue, high peaks of imagination. "The Times" A passion for language, wordplay and puns bursts from the pages. "Daily Telegraph"" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

A hilarious fantasy, co-written by Terry Pratchett, aged seventeen, and master storyteller, Terry Pratchett, aged forty-three. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The story behind this story is nearly the best story of all: "This book had two authors, one aged seventeen, one aged forty-three. Both of them were Terry Pratchett." Having penned this tale and had it lapse into obscurity, Pratchett is impelled by his editors to revive it years later. Rightly so. For the dedicated PTerry fan, this example of his early writing is an illuminating read. Many views expressed in the Discworld books are readily perceived here. For someone new to Pratchett, it's a great introduction to the scope of his ideas and his writing skills. For any reader, it's simply a delight to enjoy.
The story is a fine example of Pratchett's ability to view the world from a fresh perspective. If there's a fantasy novel lacking a dark forest and mysterious creatures, i've missed it. Pratchett, never a formula writer, simply shrinks the scope. His forested world is a thickly napped rug. Instead of pines or oaks, it's nylon and wool "hairs". The creatures are there, the snargs, the hymetors and others - including silverfish, who live under the world. There are also people - the Munrungs, the Deftmenes and - the Dumii. They interact, sometimes violently. Deep down in the pile, these people and their communities are invisible to humans. Something, however, sends terror through the forest peoples - Fray. This immensely destructive force topples cities and obliterates villages.
Pratchett builds a story of the conflict of respected traditions countered by innovation and invention. There is an Empire, to which taxes are due. That means clerks, organisation, regulations. While the Munrungs have always met the demands for revenue, others have opposed the imposition, hence, the Empire. Could two such peoples find a common cause?
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Format: Audio Cassette
As a teacher of ages 9 to 11 I think this book has enormous potential as a shared reading text for use in the classroom. Pratchett takes an everyday item, a carpet, and turns it into something magical. The use of language and his descriptions are ideal for younger readers and having read many of pratchetts other books, including the terrific Wee Free Men and A Hat Full of Sky, I think this is an ideal starter for anyone who may not of read any Terry Pratchett before as it isn't as complex as some of his other books nor are the descritptions as detailed.
I can't wait to share this book with my students and I would recommend other teachers to read this book too. We'll certainly be doing lots of creative writing and story telling based on this book and hopefully writing our own answers to questions such as `What is Fray?'.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Let me make one thing very clear - I have loved this book since I borrowed a first edition from our local library many, many years ago. My complaints do not refer to the story, just to the extremely disappointing packaging of this edition.

When I stumbled across a paperback edition of the revised book in Manchester airport, I was very sad to see that the illustrations that I had been captivated by as a child were not present. It was like a copy of Winnie-the-Pooh without the original illustrations - unthinkable. I had thought that the hardback edition would restore them, but no such luck. I even contemplated trying to get hold of a first edition until I found out how much such a thing would cost (gulp!). Then I saw that this edition was going to be released which contained the illustrations. I was very, very happy.

However, when I received the copy yesterday I was devastated to find that, not only had the writing been printed on very inferior quality paper, but the format of the book did absolutely no favours to the illustrations at all. OK, they had been printed on glossy paper, but they had all been bound into one clump and because the size of the book was so small, much of the detail was lost. The larger format pictures from the original book (eg the Hymetors and the Wights) had been so compressed as to be next to useless. Worst of all, by far the best picture in the original book - a double page spread illustrating a sugar crystal surrounded by a mass of licking creatures of all shapes and sizes - was not there at all. A real tragedy!

So, if you are wanting to get this book as a cheap alternative to a first edition, forget it. The book is brilliant to read, but this edition is a massive disappointment.
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Format: Paperback
The story behind this story is nearly the best story of all: "This book had two authors, one aged seventeen, one aged forty-three. Both of them were Terry Pratchett." Having penned this tale and had it lapse into obscurity, Pratchett is impelled by his editors to revive it years later. Rightly so. For the dedicated PTerry fan, this example of his early writing is an illuminating read. Many views expressed in the Discworld books are readily perceived here. For someone new to Pratchett, it's a great introduction to the scope of his ideas and his writing skills. For any reader, it's simply a delight to enjoy.
The story is a fine example of Pratchett's ability to view the world from a fresh perspective. If there's a fantasy novel lacking a dark forest and mysterious creatures, i've missed it. Pratchett, never a formula writer, simply shrinks the scope. His forested world is a thickly napped rug. Instead of pines or oaks, it's nylon and wool "hairs". The creatures are there, the snargs, the hymetors and others - including silverfish, who live under the world. There are also people - the Munrungs, the Deftmenes and - the Dumii. They interact, sometimes violently. Deep down in the pile, these people and their communities are invisible to humans. Something, however, sends terror through the forest peoples - Fray. This immensely destructive force topples cities and obliterates villages.
Pratchett builds a story of the conflict of respected traditions countered by innovation and invention. There is an Empire, to which taxes are due. That means clerks, organisation, regulations. While the Munrungs have always met the demands for revenue, others have opposed the imposition, hence, the Empire. Could two such peoples find a common cause?
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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