£25.49
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Usually dispatched within 2 to 3 weeks.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Carpe Diem: Put a Little ... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Carpe Diem: Put a Little Latin in Your Life Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Audiobook, CD, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£25.49
£25.49 £49.68
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£25.49 FREE Delivery in the UK. Usually dispatched within 2 to 3 weeks. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc; Library ed edition (6 Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400135249
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400135240
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 2.3 x 16.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Product Description

Synopsis

A lighthearted introduction to Latin draws on examples from pop culture to identify everyday sayings with Latin origins, from "alter ego" and "ad nauseum" to "caveat emptor" and "e pluribus unum," in a whimsical tour of the language's obscure and arcane rules.


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This book isn't one of those frighteningly complex-looking book full of tables, rules and vast reams of incomprehensible text; Carpe Diem is, instead, an amusing book with lots of prose discussing how we view Latin in today's world, as well as some amusing reminiscences of Harry Mount's various Latin teachers, architectural history and more. The prose is well written and informative with a light touch and referring to people including David Beckham, Angelina Jolie, various US presidents and, of course, lots of dead people from the classical era, although hints of his public school education come through in some of the language he uses. Nestled within this are occasional tables with Latin declensions or conjugations, very short lists of vocabulary, occasional photographs and some Latin quotations (always translated).

This book works just as well for people who don't have any Latin at all; whilst they'll probably skim through the various noun, verb and adjective tables there is still lots of Latin scattered amongst the prose (always explained) which makes you realise how many Latin words we actually use. It's not entirely clear who this book is for, as it's not a serious scholarly work for the Latin learner and it's not a beginner's guide for the Latin newbie - it's probably more of an enjoyable book for those who learned some Latin years ago and remember it with the fondness of time, having forgotten about the evils of learning endless lists of awkward words, as well as an amusing tour through history and other aspects by an excellent writer.

This book was previously published in the UK under the title 'Amo, Amas, Amat... And All That' and was one of the publishing success stories of 2006.

Originally published for Curled Up With A Good Book, . © Helen Hancox 2007
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Excellent book if you are just interested in Latin, the development of language and/or having a literary laugh!!

Well written - amusing and thoughtful - of interest to our daughter considering Latin A level and ourselves as wider readers.

But beware this book and Mount's 'Amo Amas' are absolutely identical - although sold as a pair - have Amazon checked this?

Tigger
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars 20 reviews
119 of 123 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fun and enjoyable, but a bit sloppily done 15 Nov. 2007
By Johnny McGuy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I just got a copy of this book, which apparently has sold really well in England. As a Latin teacher, I'm all for anything that might benefit the cause, and this is definitely a good book to give to people who don't know anything about Latin and so don't understand its difficulties and rewards. I know another teacher who has considered recommending this to parents of his students, in part so that they can understand how studying Latin differs from studying modern languages. Even if you don't have a child, and are just curious as to what all the fuss about Latin is, it's worth reading this.

For those who took Latin in high school, this should awake (hopefully pleasant) memories, and might help you shake off the cobwebs. It can serve as a nice little refresher, and there's enough Latin in there (always translated) to remind you how much you still know.

Part of the reason that I didn't give the book a higher rating is that there are a few too many mistakes for my taste. While I would not expect a book such as this to give extended grammatical explanations, I would expect the grammar it does cover to be correct, and such is not always the case. If you have no interest in Latin grammar, you can stop reading this review now; suffice it to say that this is a good, but not perfect book, that would benefit greatly from a corrected second edition.

If you are interested in grammar, however, here are a few of the mistakes I found (I didn't start jotting down page numbers until about halfway through the book):

132 - "So the supine always ends in -um...." The supine also can end in -u (when it is an ablative, as opposed to an accusative in -um); he uses such a supine on 115, in 'mirabile dictu' and 'horribile dictu.'

156 - In his chart for the perfect passive, he does not change 'amatus' to 'amati' and 'monitus' to 'moniti,' etc.

179 - he defines 'pro' as "before, in front of," which is fine, though mentioning that it can also mean "on behalf of" would have helped with things like 'pro bono,' and an even fuller discussion of this preposition would have helped with phrases like 'quid pro quo.' I can understand the desire not to overload the reader with definitions, but I think that he could have made a more sensible choice here.

193 - his chart suggests that the interrogative pronoun 'quis, quid' has separate forms in the singular for the masculine and feminine, though this is not the case. Thus his forms 'quam' and 'qua' do not technically exist (for this word, at least).

196 - this has nothing to do with grammar, but for some reason he gives 'miror, -ari' in his vocabulary list for a sentence though no form of that word appears in that sentence.

221 - he says of 'de gustibus non est disputandum,' "A rare use of the gerund," when it is, in fact, a gerundive. He does, however, translate it properly.

The above are some of the most glaring mistakes, and while none of them are all that serious, there's little excuse for them to be there. They would bother me more, I suppose, if I thought that people were going to learn Latin only from this book, but I'm not quite sure that such a thing would be possible (except for the brightest and most motivated).

All in all, it's a nice little book, and I think it does a good job of showcasing what makes Latin unique.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great fun! 5 Dec. 2007
By Helen Hancox - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book isn't one of those frighteningly complex-looking book full of tables, rules and vast reams of incomprehensible text; Carpe Diem is, instead, an amusing book with lots of prose discussing how we view Latin in today's world, as well as some amusing reminiscences of Harry Mount's various Latin teachers, architectural history and more. The prose is well written and informative with a light touch and referring to people including David Beckham, Angelina Jolie, various US presidents and, of course, lots of dead people from the classical era, although hints of his public school education come through in some of the language he uses. Nestled within this are occasional tables with Latin declensions or conjugations, very short lists of vocabulary, occasional photographs and some Latin quotations (always translated).

This book works just as well for people who don't have any Latin at all; whilst they'll probably skim through the various noun, verb and adjective tables there is still lots of Latin scattered amongst the prose (always explained) which makes you realise how many Latin words we actually use. It's not entirely clear who this book is for, as it's not a serious scholarly work for the Latin learner and it's not a beginner's guide for the Latin newbie - it's probably more of an enjoyable book for those who learned some Latin years ago and remember it with the fondness of time, having forgotten about the evils of learning endless lists of awkward words, as well as an amusing tour through history and other aspects by an excellent writer.

This book was previously published in the UK under the title 'Amo, Amas, Amat... And All That' and was one of the publishing success stories of 2006.

Originally published for Curled Up With A Good Book, [...] © Helen Hancox 2007
22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Definitely British and definitely not scholarly 29 Dec. 2007
By Bernard M. Patten - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Ugh! No index. Ugh! Lots of errors: eg supine can end in u, disputandum is gerundive, some cases wrong, ad hominem in logic means more than he thinks it does, ad libidum might as "ad lib" mean "off the cuff" in comedy shows but in music and medicine it means freely, and of course Carpe diem does not exactly translate "Get a bloody move on." Was MI6 (military intelligence 6, the British CIA) really out to get Diana? And what pray tell has that to do with Latin? As for me, I like translations closer to the original Latin: So for me "mea maximal culpa" means through my most grevious fault and not "my fault in spades." Latin is stately. Let's keep it that way: Et nunc in perpetuum, Frater, Ave atque Vale for me sounds better as "And now, forever Brother, Hale and Farewell" and not Mount's cute "Hello and goodbye, brother, forever." My translation follows the original Latin order and gives the scene and statement dignity. After all, this is not a meeting at a night-club this is a funeral poem. Oh, well, who cares? My father said his generation would be the last to read Greek and my generation the last to read Latin. And matter of fact, if this book is an example, the future for Latin looks less than rosy, and of course it's wine-dark for Greek.
21 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ...place is full of "wankers" 6 Jan. 2008
By Jonathon R. Howard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If you read some of the other reviews here you'll probably notice some of the people Mount mentions in his book. The ones pointing out all the little "errors" Mount left in his text, those folks are snobs, Mount calls them wankers, they piss and moan about the state of the language, but then go out of their way to make it seem as daunting and intimidating as possible. That kind of attitude isn't going to get students interested in Classical history, and it most definitely isn't going to fill chairs in a Latin class. Mount doesn't cover ever single little rule because it isn't in his interest to do so. He only states a dozen or so times that his intent is to give the average person enough information to translate the bits and pieces of vestigial Latin our civilization retains. His audience doesn't need to know that the supine occasionally declines with a -u and not an -um!

In this, Mount succeeds wonderfully! His little book is a great primer to the subject, his examples are of his own construction and use people and places we've all heard of. He covers all the basics and even has a few tests. If a reader picks the book up, reads it, and leaves with a desire to dig a little deeper into the subject, I'm elated! It is only through such small victories that interest in Latin will ever be renewed.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Discouraging 19 Feb. 2009
By R. Miller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
It is sad to say that some of the people that reviewed this book showed an ample amount of vindictive behaviour towards Harry Mount and his book. Frankly, most of them act like pendejos and pieces of khraa (merde if you understand French), that it makes me want to stay as far away that I can from the world of classical antiquity.

I am sixteen, and study Latin ardently at school and whenever I can; my dream is to become a Classics professor. Yet, seeing the way that people get treated in this kind of business definitely makes me realise that my time could better be spent doing something useful. Sure I love history and linguistics, and yes I think they are both beneficial, but the attitudes of all the snobs that think they know everything is so repelling, I might just be better apt sacrificing my useless life into something that doesn't have such an odour of snobbery.

The book was not all that bad, and honestly it did a great job in even attracting my friends at school into Latin. Not only did they think it humorous, but they asked me to help them find out more about the language itself. If the tradition of Latin is to be carried on, it can not be so convoluted that it ceases to attract a generation willing to hold up its banner. As one progresses in the language then it is acceptable that one should learn the intricacies of said language, but how would someone want to learn a language that is perceived as impossibly difficult and stand-offish from the get go?

All in all, I think the older generation should be more encouraging to those younger concerning the studies of classical languages and histories. Only then will knowledge and love of Latin increase.

Another thing that upsets me is the way Mount is treated for simply being British. Now don't take this the wrong way, I love America and am proud of my country, but Americans are the most unaccepting sort there is. All the places I have travelled have accepted me and tried to understand American culture. Right away, some people simply chided Mr. Mount for being British. Well, it is not his fault he is British. Valgame Dios!!! If you can't even take a step to try to overlook the fact that he is not American then obviously you will hate the book.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback