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Canto Import

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Ecm Records
  • ASIN: B00000320G
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 864,960 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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By Sentinel TOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Aug. 2010
Format: Audio CD
Charles Lloyd's albums on ECM tend to have a restrained, meditative quality, but 'Canto' largely bucks this trend. That's not to say that it's lacking in quieter, more reflective moments, there's plenty of light and shade here, but it does have a more restless, questing spirit. 'Tales of Rumi', the opening track, begins with some rather spare and skittish chords on Anders Jormin's bass, and the entry of Bobo Stenson's piano, echoes this jitter (some chords sound plucked?). Lloyd's sax slides warmly across this restlessness, appearing to provide the certainty the other instruments need, but soon it too starts to sound unsettled, as it moves into a higher register.
This really sets the tone for the album, where many of the pieces lack the grounded calm certainty of much of Lloyd's other work, but instead explore the musical ideas as each instrument(including the memorable Tibetan oboe!) takes turns at exploring the possibilities of hidden alleyways, and the idea of 'the road less taken'. As always, the musicianship and production values are impeccable, and there's still much emotional richness and warmth. However, this is not an album to encourage complacency, but its provocative, questing spirit repays the attention of the fellow traveller. 'Durga Durga', the shortest track, gives a sense of arrival and completion, as if the restless spirit has been finally satisfied. Look out your walking boots, rucksack and compass, and join Lloyd's quest!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8e653ab0) out of 5 stars 7 reviews
29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f0dc6e4) out of 5 stars there is coltrane and than there is lloyd 30 Oct. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
 
 
 
Charles Lloyd- Canto
with Bobo Stenson (piano), Anders Jormin (bass) Billy Hart (drums) and Charles Lloyd (tenor sax, Tibetan oboe)
ECM 1635
 
Charles Lloyd was very much responsible for me listening to ECM in a serious way again. When I first heard Notes From Big Sur, I didn't quite know what I was hearing, except that it had genius written all over it. Those long sheets of sound that he was creating, those musical silences, the interplay between the musicians. There was respect at work here as well as eastern influences and philosophies. Well little has changed in all this time and Lloyd now offers up his fifth recording for ECM. I may add that this is as good as anything he has done in the past on this label. Again the introspection, the soft style of sax playing, the sensation with this outfit that they and us as listeners are floating on air or a cloud of notes. This is the thing with Charles Lloyd's music, it gives one the feeling of peace and weightlessness. I have a lot of respect for Manfred Eicher and ECM. He single handedly has changed the way a lot of us have listened and for that he should be placed in the musical hall of fame alongside a lot of his artists. I think I have made peace with the fact that I will never come to terms with the avant garde outings on this label, the way out of left field Nordic jazz that Eicher has taken a chance on, folks like Jon Balke, Krakatau etc.You see it is not of my culture. I understand it and on an intellectual level I can accept it but I don't find it interesting in the least. Still there is enough on ECM to feed this soul and this is about Canto after all.
I think of the music of the sixties when I hear Charles Lloyd. There were so many ideas happening at the time and with all the black American jazz around I think it would have been an interesting time to be around exploring music. Charles Lloyd himself has been around for a long time and in the past has worked with blues based musicians Howlin' Wolf, B.B King as well as Ornette Coleman, Eric Dolphy, Cannonball Adderley and Chico Hamilton to name a few. The bible of jazz says he discovered Keith Jarrett as well as Michael Petrucciani and at the end of the 60's after Haight Ashbury, peace and love, decided to drop out so to speak. One of the reasons he came back was Michael Petrucciani who he struck up a friendship with, and this coupled with what he calls the sympatico between his music and Nordic jazz players like Anders Jormin and Bobo Stenson and the audiences from this part of the world was enough to rekindle the flames.
Canto is late night music. Nothing abrasive or confrontational here. Bobo Stenson absolutely oozes sensitivity on this recording and Anders Jormin on the double bass is a man in control of this larger than life sounding instrument. There are the references to eastern ideas, as usual, on this recording especially Tales Of Rumi, inspired by the writing of Sufi poet and philosopher Jalaluddin Rumi. Also Nachiketa's Lament, based on one of the stories in the Upanishads. I can't praise this highly enough and every time I hear it I want to pull out the other recordings and phone up Manfred and say thank you.
Charles Lloyd himself says "We play for those miraculous moments when the music opens up and you know you are home." Pure magic, have no doubts about that.
 
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8ea65420) out of 5 stars Lloyd's Finest 12 July 2004
By G B - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Canto was Charles Lloyd's fifth album for ECM, and like the first four featured Lloyd in front of a piano-bass-drum rhythm section. (Canto features the same musicians as The Call and All My Relations: Bobo Stenson, Anders Jormin and Billy Hart.) Much, though not all, of the material on those early albums is quiet, slow-pace and introspective. Canto has that same inward-looking vibe, and the music often moves along at a measured pace, but it adds a focused intensity that wasn't always present on earlier recordings.
"Tales of Rumi" begins quietly and mysteriously, the rhythm section slowly building tension over several minutes to prepare for Charles's entrance. He comes in, solos briefly with a Middle Eastern motif, then stops the rhythm section for a majestic invocation on tenor. The band then resumes and plays the same material they did in the beginning at a much faster tempo. After a Stenson solo, Charles re-enters with some of the most ferocious playing he's offered in the past twenty years. It's an incredible jazz performance.
The music mellows out after this intense workout. There are two beautiful ballad performances on "How Can I Tell You" and "Desolation Sound". The title track is a slow-paced piece that doesn't go anywhere in particular but at least makes the journey enjoyable with lyrical playing by both Lloyd and Stenson. "Nachiketa's Lament" is a dirge featuring Lloyd's mournful playing on Tibetan oboe. The album then regains momentum. "M" opens with an unaccompanied bass solo by Jormin before locking into a groove. Bobo Stenson solo turns up the heat before Lloyd comes in with some intense wailing. The album finally wraps up with an exhilarating, luminous rubato ballad a la "After the Rain" or "Ogunde". These last two performances evoke the classic Coltrane quartet in the best sense.
All four musicians are on top of their game. Charles's playing is some of the fiercest and most focused of his career, Bobo Stenson is superb as both a soloist and an accompanist, and Billy Hart's powerful drumming is captured beautifully by the ECM engineers.
Lloyd's next few albums after Canto have a different sound, adding John Abercrombie on guitar and placing Billy Higgins behind the drums. For whatever reason, those excellent albums get a lot more hype than this one. That's unfair, because Canto offers a sense of mystery and emotional depth that they don't always match; it's my favorite.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f5ba8b8) out of 5 stars Majesty -- Lloyd's Best 26 Feb. 2000
By Steve Silberman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is the best of the Charles Lloyd "comeback" albums, and some of the most astonishingly beautiful and powerful jazz quartet music ever made. It's the the Coltrane quartet that played "Spiritual" and "India" crossed with the Bill Evans Trio that played "Jade Visions." The first tune coalesces out of a cloud of inside-the-piano space, and unleashes a volcanic riff that builds and builds -- and the rest of the disc is subtle, moody, extremely mature music. This is what jazz is about.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8e9b6024) out of 5 stars rumi.nations on the ballad 4 May 2008
By Case Quarter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
for listeners of charles lloyd who enjoy his music based on a comparison of his tenor sound with john coltrane's tenor sax, canto will be a treat. and the ballad, how can i tell you, sounds as if lifted from coltrane's recording, ballads. canto is a stop and go ballad; about four minutes into a coltrane sounding ballad, lloyd stops playing and moments later picks up by developing a bossa nova ballad. whereas the opening tenor sax notes of desolate sound are so similar to wayne shorter's ballad, iris, that you might want to listen to desolate sound as a reconstruction of iris.

in fact, the entire recording seems to reconstruct the glacial sleepy drone that defines the ecm sound. the best jazz saxophonists who recorded with ecm, back in the 80s and 90s entered the rarified air of shangri-la, picked up flutes and soprano saxophones and took part in ushering a new age by putting listeners to sleep with spare notes and droning snake charming music. fjords in the desert chants. lloyd starts out with that kind of music with tales of rumi, and on nachiketa's lament he plays a tibetan oboe.

the ecm sound has worked well for pianists, keith jarrett made his home with ecm for decades. bobo stenson is the dominant force for jazz on lloyd's recording, and when stenson lets loose on tales of rumi, lloyd follows. billy hart gets to solo on m, anders jormin opening m with a scratching solo bass evocative of the first movement of coltrane's a love supreme, followed by drums and piano in a trio setting before joined by lloyd minutes later blowing a strong tenor. m is the most solid jazz piece on the recording in contrast to other forms of music, new age, eastern, nordic, whether blended or straight.

given my impressions of ecm music and lloyd's musical strategies on canto, i almost want to describe canto as a jazz subversion. at any rate, lloyd is a jazz musician on his toes, his eyes wide open, in this situation, a recording for many many pleasurable listenings.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f0dcba0) out of 5 stars a questing, searching journey 5 Sept. 2010
By Sentinel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Charles Lloyd's albums on ECM tend to have a restrained, meditative quality, but 'Canto' largely bucks this trend. That's not to say that it's lacking in quieter, more reflective moments, there's plenty of light and shade here, but it does have a more restless, questing spirit. 'Tales of Rumi', the opening track, begins with some rather spare and skittish chords on Anders Jormin's bass, and the entry of Bobo Stenson's piano, echoes this jitter (some chords sound plucked?). Lloyd's sax slides warmly across this restlessness, appearing to provide the certainty the other instruments need, but soon it too starts to sound unsettled, as it moves into a higher register.
This really sets the tone for the album, where many of the pieces lack the grounded calm certainty of much of Lloyd's other work, but instead explore the musical ideas as each instrument(including the memorable Tibetan oboe!) takes turns at exploring the possibilities of hidden alleyways, and the idea of 'the road less taken'. As always, the musicianship and production values are impeccable, and there's still much emotional richness and warmth. However, this is not an album to encourage complacency, but its provocative, questing spirit repays the attention of the fellow traveller. 'Durga Durga', the shortest track, gives a sense of arrival and completion, as if the restless spirit has been finally satisfied. Look out your walking boots, rucksack and compass, and join Lloyd's quest!
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