Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Cambridge Illustrated History of China (Cambridge Illustrated Histories) Paperback – 25 Jan 2010

4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£22.74 £37.15
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (25 Jan. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521124336
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521124331
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 2.6 x 25.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 58,215 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Book Description

In this sumptuously illustrated single-volume history, now in its second edition, noted historian Patricia Buckley Ebrey traces the origins of Chinese culture from prehistoric times to the present. Both a comprehensive introduction to an extraordinary civilization and an expert exploration of the continuities and disjunctures of Chinese history, Professor Ebrey's book has become an indispensable guide to China past and present.

About the Author

Patricia Buckley Ebrey is Professor of History at the University of Washington and the author of multiple books and articles.


Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I bought this book for my daughter who is studying Chinese at University. She had borrowed it from a local library before her course started and realised that in comparison with all the books that she was then advised to read for research, this was the only one that didn't bore her silly. It has all the information with good illustrations whilst being a thoroughly interesting read.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Chinese history texts can, for the general reader, collapse into a confusing morass of difficult names, which look very similar, or at least are difficult to remember and get a fix on. Cultural histories can give you a disjointed dip into beuatiful and interesting things, but the historical moorings tend to part too easily. "A magnificent Shang bronze funeral vessel" - but what was the Shang? And so on. What is truly remarkable about this book is its balance.A moderately careful, unrushed read of it will unfold chronologies, political and military developments, geography, the history of ideas, and cultural artefacts side by side, with a most helpful clarity. The writing is relaxed and direct, makes modern sense, without straining to be "contemporary" or "relevant." There is also a good deal of common sense. For example,if patriotic Chinese historians want to stress the uniqueness of their country's ancient cultures,they may run the risk of suggesting that it is superior to ignore cultural and technological influences from neighbouring civilizations, whereas surely the more impressive characteristic is to adopt what works, and make it your own - which is what, the author demonstrates, early Chinese states did. So there is a kind of civilised calm about this book which is most attractive. I look forward to seeing how the author will deal with the Maoist years.
In short, this book is an excellent exemplar of a one-volume introductory history, and it is copiously and well-illustrated. Or as you might say, its yin and yang are in perfect harmony.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was essential reading for one of my modules at university and it serves its purpose very well.

The book covers Chinese history from earliest times through to the 2008 Olympic games and beyond. Each period of history is given its own chapter, which is especially helpful if, like I was, one is studying the dynastic period.

The university module in question covers the dynastic period, so that was the only part of the book that I studied in any great detail. Each chapter is detailed and interesting, easy to read and contains lots of "boxes" that include information that might not be essential for the comprehension of the particular dynasty, but are often interesting little titbits about artists or other great men, paintings, cultural icons or even the great wall. The lion's share of the book is given over to the dynastic period but it also include a few brief chapters on the history of China since 1900. They do not go into the greatest detail, but I think they are detailed enough and highlight all the major events of the period.

The numerous images throughout the book are a pleasant addition. Many of them are full colour and most double page spreads have at least one picture to break up the large blocks of text.

Ebrey's writing style is engaging and easy to read, making this book pleasant, enjoyable and not too heavy. I think that the book is perfect for those who are looking for an academic textbook, but also the more casual historian who is looking for an introduction to Chinese history. For the casual historian, this book would make excellent bed time reading as well.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was looking for a basic history book to provide some insight into modern China.

Just read Patricia Buckley Ebrey's 'Cambridge Illustrated History - China' (2nd Edition). Would recommend this to anyone looking for an outline history. Not that one reading of 360 odd pages makes for an expert on China. But it certainly helps in trying to understand some of the background to what is modern China.

Reminds me of how little I learned about China during my school days. And how we were programmed to measure China's progress in terms of how it imitated Western culture. Wrong approach.

Interesting to walk through the different dynasties - their rise and fall (Tang, Song, Liao, Jin, Yuan, Ming, Qing) - through to Mao and modern China.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Ebrey is always sensitive to the implications of events for ordinary people and for women. She constructs her history like a vast collage of voices, and strive to include every sort of person in the tale. Her narrative features numerous sidebars offering fascinating sub-plots, on topics like Tang-era love stories, house construction, The Biographies of Heroic Women, by Liu Xiang (79-8 BC), codes of crime and punishment, legendary demons, village fairs, popular dramas such as Injustice to Dou E, modern painting, or the life of feminist writer Ding Ling (1904-85). Almost every page is quietly entertaining.

--author of A Galaxy of Immortal Women: The Yin Side of Chinese Civilization
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I found this a highly readable book with a good balance of text, illustrations and maps.
It covers the history of China without getting too detailed and includes social change and religion.
It surprised me that China has been governed by 'foreigners' for much of its history (the pigtail was a decreed sign of submission to one foreign government) and that far from my understanding that only the twentieth century was a period of tumult, there were sustained, destructive rebellions and uprisings during the nineteenth century as well.
The author usefully cross refers to the developments in other cultures so the book puts the Chinese history into a world history perspective.
However, I did find the coverage from the 1950's onwards to be more of an anti-communist treatise than an objective history. The conclusion I drew from the text was that the Nationalists would have governed better - refer to the success of Taiwan and the enlightened 1930s Nationalist laws for the emancipation of women.
Anyway, apart from that disappointment I enjoyed the book as it had sufficient detail to satisfy my curiosity about this new super-power and the book provided a European perspective so the history of China was understandable to my Anglo-centric education.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback