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Caedmon's Song by [Robinson, Peter]
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Caedmon's Song Reprints , Kindle Edition

3.3 out of 5 stars 196 customer reviews

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Product description

Amazon.co.uk Review

Steadily, inexorably, Peter Robinson has been building a rock-solid following for his highly accomplished crime novels--and it's not hard to see why. Books like his latest, Caedmon's Song, have all the requisite page-turning compulsiveness, but Robinson freights in a layer of psychological penetration that many in the genre strive for but few achieve.

A university student has unwisely decided to walk though a night-shrouded park. She is savagely assaulted and wakes in hospital with her memory of the attack wiped clean. Through her tortured consciousness, impressions slowly begin to appear: memories of her attackers--there were two--begin to coalesce. Robinson's sympathy and understanding for the anguish of the student, Kirsten, is detailed with much understated skill and we become as keen as she is to crack the identity of her attackers.

But this is only one of Robinson's plot strands: his other protagonist, Martha Browne, has made her way to the historic seaside town of Whitby with a hidden agenda. Outwardly she is an author doing research for a forthcoming book, but beneath the surface she is tracking down, with steely determination, a malign figure. Who is this mysterious quarry? And what is the connection with the hospitalised student? Robinson is in no hurry to make these connections and the delicious frustration for the reader only increases the determination to read on.

While the plotting here has precisely the kind of jewel-like precision to be found in such previous Robinson titles as The Summer That Never Was and Aftermath, he's clearly not content to rest with the level of observation that distinguished those books: here, the pertinent comments on society and our attitude to criminals never derail the storytelling panache. Instead they act as the kind of shoring-up that lends weight and power to crime novels. --Barry Forshaw

Amazon Review

Steadily, inexorably, Peter Robinson has been building a rock-solid following for his highly accomplished crime novels--and it's not hard to see why. Books like his latest, Caedmon's Song, have all the requisite page-turning compulsiveness, but Robinson freights in a layer of psychological penetration that many in the genre strive for but few achieve.

A university student has unwisely decided to walk though a night-shrouded park. She is savagely assaulted and wakes in hospital with her memory of the attack wiped clean. Through her tortured consciousness, impressions slowly begin to appear: memories of her attackers--there were two--begin to coalesce. Robinson's sympathy and understanding for the anguish of the student, Kirsten, is detailed with much understated skill and we become as keen as she is to crack the identity of her attackers.

But this is only one of Robinson's plot strands: his other protagonist, Martha Browne, has made her way to the historic seaside town of Whitby with a hidden agenda. Outwardly she is an author doing research for a forthcoming book, but beneath the surface she is tracking down, with steely determination, a malign figure. Who is this mysterious quarry? And what is the connection with the hospitalised student? Robinson is in no hurry to make these connections and the delicious frustration for the reader only increases the determination to read on.

While the plotting here has precisely the kind of jewel-like precision to be found in such previous Robinson titles as The Summer That Never Was and Aftermath, he's clearly not content to rest with the level of observation that distinguished those books: here, the pertinent comments on society and our attitude to criminals never derail the storytelling panache. Instead they act as the kind of shoring-up that lends weight and power to crime novels. --Barry Forshaw


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1370 KB
  • Print Length: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Pan; Reprints edition (21 Aug. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003GK20Z4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars 196 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #19,987 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Love Peter Robinson.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It is not an Inspector Banks story very boring and very prodictable ending
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Format: Kindle Edition
I have just finished reading this book and enjoyed it immensely.I have just waded through other customers' thoughts about the story.I am intrigued to hear one reader say he had worked out "who dunnit" by page 124.A real miracle, I feel. Could I buy my National Lottery ticket from this person, please?!! I really like Peter Robinson's writing.His narrative flows and his English is faultless.He wrote it in the 1980s and, of course, times were different then. I rather liked this return to the past and the charm of a life without 24 hour news, no DNA and the ubiquitous use of mobile phones etc.I liked the descriptions of the towns and villages of North Yorkshire and of Bath, too.I felt the story had both pace and mystery.The end, when it came , was rather brusque and more could have been made of the climax.Characterisation was strong. All in all a very good read!!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book because it said that it was an "Inspector Banks Mystery", it was not. It was not until the end of the book that I discovered that Peter Robinson thought that he needed a change from writing Inspector Banks stories. Caedmon's Song was very unsatisfactory. You would need to be brain dead not to work out the two different women at he start of the book were in fact the same woman. The setting of Whitby was interesting as it is a favourite place of mine, but the story itself was predictable and the ending most unsatisfactory. What happened to Kirsten as a result of her murders and attempted murders, how far behind her were the police, did the poor unfortunate Australian backpacker regain consciousness and identify her, etc. etc. and where was Inspector Banks!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Sorry, Amazon, but you advertise this book as an Inspector Banks story, and it is not. It is by Peter Robinson, and it's not a bad tale, but please amend your website before any other readers get taken in.
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Format: Paperback
I have just finished this book, I found it almost impossible to put down.

I have only recently discovered this Author , this book being the third I have read, the other two being part of the Inspector Banks series.

I found this book a very easy and interesting read. There are not too many characters to wrestle with and lose track of. The central character, Kirsten, is well drawn and believable. There are some gruesome bits but they are not dwelled upon nor sensationalised in any way. This book is different to the Banks series but none the worse for that and is a good stand alone novel.

I will be reading more from this Author. I would say that this book would be great for a long flight, would definitely absorb the reader and could be finished almost in one sitting.

I thoroughly enjoyed it.
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Format: Paperback
The book is in alternating chapters, both devoted to one of two characters.

One is a young woman attacked and left for dead in a park after a university end of year party.

The other is a woman arriving in Whitby on an unspecified mission which involves seeking out somebody.

There is not much hint at the time at which each takes place.

This being a novel there must be a link between the two, but what?

Things start to fall into place leading to a rather underplayed denouement, after some things have not gone to plan.

I did have a few gripes about the plausibility of some things, but as I read on these were not really justified.

The first Robinson I have read that is not a Banks and well worth the read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is NOT an Inspector Banks Mystery. I bought it because it was listed as "An Inspector Banks Mystery Book 22" but Banks is not in it. It is just written by the same author. Number 22 in the Inspector Banks series is in fact "Abattoir Blues". I think listing it as being one of the Inspector Banks Mystery Series is very misleading and a bit of a Con. I feel Amazon should refund me for this book or let me download the real series number 22, "Abattoir Blues" for free.
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