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Buxtehude: Complete Organ Music Box set

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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£23.03 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Audio CD (26 Oct. 2004)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 6
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Vox
  • ASIN: B0006SSNIW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 403,753 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Te Deum, laudamus, BuxWV218 - Canzon, BuxWV166 - Canzonetta, BuxWV167 - Toccata, BuxWV156 - Chorals - Préludes... / Walter Kraft, orgue

Customer Reviews

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Format: Audio CD
Buxtehude was but one of a long and distinguished line of Dutch, Danish and German organists/composers beginning with Conrad Paumann in the fifteenth century and ending with the death of J S Bach and the Barok epoch some three hundred years later. In the company of Sweelinck, Bruhns, Muffat, Reinken et al, he was a luminary; but it is as mentor and inspirer of Bach that his place in history has been elevated above that of the others.

Musically, he was very inventive but seemed to have a rather short attention span so that the potential of much of his thematic material remained undeveloped. It was in the hands of Bach (who "borrowed" a surprising amount of Buxtehude's writing - a common enough practice at the time) that the seeds germinated to achieve the zenith of Barok organ composition. This set from Vox and Walter Kraft reminds us of just how much Bach and, by extension, ourselves, was/are indebted to Buxtehude.

Sadly, the three organs organs of the Marienkirche, Lübeck, two of which pre-dated Buxtehude, were destroyed in 1942. The instrument of the Totentanzkapelle (from 1477) was restored to a 17th century specification in 1937 but this and the chapel were damaged in the fire following an allied bombing raid. However, Kemper u. Sohne were able to restore the instrument to its pre-war condition and it is this organ that is featured on these recordings. It is voiced in a manner with which Buxtehude would have been familiar and is quite well suited to this purpose but it proved mechanically unreliable and was replaced some ten years after these recordings were made. A more suitable instrument would be the church's Große Orgel (also by Kemper) but this was not completed until 1986.
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Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
Walter Kraft is no Jean Guillou but who is for that matter? I've often endured people's disgust with how Kraft performs but what exactly did VOX hear in this man's playing that my colleagues didn't? Why did VOX contract this man to record all of Bach's and Buxtehude's work?

I'll tell you what I DO NOT hear. I don't hear the sporadic, rhythmic interrupting nonsense (Anthony Newman) and exaggerated phrasing (Jean Guillou) that so many organists dump on us with their 'personal' renditions' of how this music should be performed. What I do hear from Kraft is consistent, energetic, well-paced and registered organ performances.

I find scholarly approaches, such as this cd set, to recording this music very satisfying (with the exception of Schweitzer's mess) and I am extremely satisfied with my fellow reviewer of this album. In fact, one of Kraft's students, Werner Jacob (R.I.P.) recorded the Bach oeuvre to thrilling success.

So applause to the previous reviewers! I wondered for some time if I was one of none who ever appreciated the work of one Walter Kraft. This is an excellent album!
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
I can not comment about the overall significance of Buxteudes work compared to others or general feel of each organist that reproduces his work.

I am here to voice my observation that overall I found the recording quality disappointing. Many tracks sound crackley and the bass and high frequencies either feel held back or strained. There is a noticeable hiss on virtually all the tracks too - something I personally can not get used to.

I would recommend a listen to this before buying this, I am not convinced I made the right choice when choosing Buxteudes organ works.
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