Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

I am glad to find so many favorable reviews of this, Dorothy L Sayers' final detective fiction novel, on the internet. It failed to find much favor with the public or the critics when it was written in the late 1930s. In actual need of the income that her earlier works in this genre had generated (she had to support not only herself but also a non-productive husband and an illegitimate son), she negotiated with her publisher to "once again try my hand at detective fiction" after he had pointed out that the market seemed to have become saturated.
Just as a busman's holiday is a vacation where the busman is likely to be as involved with driving as he is throughout the rest of the year, a busman's honeymoon (a phrase which she coined) is one where the busman (in this case Lord Peter Wimsey) is likely to spend his honeymoon checking alibis, interviewing murder suspects, observing rigor mortis, and all the other tiresome activities of an amateur detective.
Lord Peter and Harriet Vane are the honeymooners. After their wedding (reported in a series of letters that begin the novel), they travel to "Talboys", a country house chosen by Harriet. Their reception is not as predicted. Eventually Lord Peter's butler, Bunter, discovers a corpse in the cellar.
The novel began life as a play, as you may infer from the many static scenes involving a large ensemble of characters entering and exiting. The prose is as rich in wit, classical illusions and sophistication as you will ever encounter in detective fiction. Dorothy L. Sayers was an honours graduate and capable of writing as well as George Eliot.
Don't expect the kind of fast food satisfaction that Agatha Christie provided so successfully. You will find instead the full silver service dining and wining experience here.
0Comment| 53 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 April 2017
Enjoy Dorothy Sayers work and these audio dramas bring Lord Whimsey to life. Great gift, or travelling companion instead of loud and annoying radio stations....
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 August 2017
Slightly disappointed , not as good as I expected. This is not to say the production was bad.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
My paperback fell apart because I have read it so often so I purchased the kindle version. Love it as much as ever and I can re-read it as often as I want Not so easy to find the best bits though!
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Not quite as wonderful as Gaudy Night but still LPW and Harriet working in partnership. Excellent.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 April 2002
Dorothy L Sayers is always a cut above your average crime novelist, especially in the Harriet Vane novels (Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night and Busman's Honeymoon). Busman's Honeymoon can't quite decide if it is a love story or a detective story ... but that really doesn't matter, it's a great example of both, with characters that really live. Read it ... but you'll enjoy it all the more if you start with Strong Poison and work your way up to it.
0Comment| 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 June 2017
Another cracking story from a "Queen of Crime"
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 August 2017
good cd
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 May 2017
Excellent. Very well written with a strong cast of characters. Bunter is in a class of his own. I really enjoyed it
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 July 2017
Excellent
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse