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The Business of Influence: Reframing Marketing and PR for the Digital Age by [Sheldrake, Philip]
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The Business of Influence: Reframing Marketing and PR for the Digital Age Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Length: 232 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

‘…questions current approaches to influence, and measuring influence, in all aspects of business.’  (Global Innovation Report, July 2011). ‘thought provoking…a lively approach to the mass of material…visionary’ Communication Director

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The Business of Influence provides answers to the pressing questions facing everyone in business in this digital age:
  • Following the rise and rise of social media, how can we make sense of the noise in our marketplace to help us achieve our objectives and beat our competitors?
  • How should the influence processes permeate the organization more systematically and measurably, accruing its practitioners more authority and accountability in the boardroom?
  • What big trends must everyone in the business of influence get to grips with?
  • Who does this stuff? What traits and skills are demanded of the modern practitioner?

Full of perceptive thought leadership, this book offers a framework to help shape an organization′s structural and cultural design. This framework, the Influence Scorecard, builds on the Balanced Scorecard and similar business performance management approaches.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1462 KB
  • Print Length: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (4 May 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0050PJ8AI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #552,568 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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By TheShopaholic TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Sept. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Author starts off his book by stating that he is not 'an academic' I would have therefore expected his book to be a more practical approach to this topic. However it was not. It was very much like reading a textbook. A reference containing facts which you could learn and regurgitate later. He also mentioned that he wanted to fully explain 'A' before going down the route of how to get to 'B' so that the road would be easier. My satnav gives better directions!

I have spent the last 20 years in business and marketing and have learnt most of what I know through hands-on experience with some large international companies, small companies and my own business alike. I had hoped that this book would have been an easier more accessible guide to what the basics of digital marketing is all about and how to apply it in the growing social web arena.

Marketing is the psychology of influence at its core with an underpinning of business to apply it for results in some way. Influencing consumers, whether it is to buy a product or to think in a particular way about something or someone is the sole purpose of marketing. Facts and figures are necessary for any business approach but only if they are analysed and used to provide some practicaly application to the business. Personally, I felt this book was more a research project which needs taking further to produce something useful.

I initially found this book hard going. I struggled to settle into it and see where it was heading. It was like reading a bad 'who dunnit' without a proper plot and without the clues.
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Format: Hardcover
Firstly I state that I know Philip Sheldrake through the excellent work his does with the UK's Chartered Institute of Public Relations' Social Media Panel. Phil's book, with its central premise that the disciplines in marketing, communications and social media should converge in a role he calls the "Chief Influence Officer", with its own business scorecard, is a compelling insight into how the world of marketing and PR is turning on its axis. And how it is far less dependent on the the silos and demarcations between departments. We all know it's happening, Phil tells it like it is.

Integrated Communications has been around for a couple of decades, Phil argues persuasively that it gets joined up if we take the business of influence seriously and manage it strategically. Phil's perspective as an engineer and professional communicator gives him the authoratative background in processes and measurement, whilst understanding the creativity, which makes for memorable and influential messages.

A couple of small improvements - I would have liked colour charts and bigger illustrations, plus a worked through "influence scorecard" to see how the Caplan and Norton model translates to the business of influence. Also, thanks to Phil for reminding me of the wit and wisdom of Miles Kington, with his pithy quote from Miles on the difference between knowledge and wisdom: "Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is knowing that a tomato doesn't belong in a fruit salad". ends/
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Having previously been impressed by The Marketing Century which itself contains a section by same author and concisely sums up a number of different aspects of marketing effectively, I was hoping for something similar from the Business of Influence. Sheldrake sets himself up as having been a mechanical engineer by trade rather than an a academic and I was therefore hoping he could sum up the points he was going to make in a practical and applicable way. Basically the key point of the book is that "It's all about influence," positive and negative and everything should be evaluated as such. Sheldrake attempts to show how this came about and how it can be used in practice by the use of an "influence scorecard," but fails to actually show how to create one and the introduction is littered with quotes from academic papers which whilst attempting to dismiss them in parts distract more than they add to the authors case.

Overall, having been involved with marketing in various parts of my job I definitely agree with the points Sheldrake is trying to make. What I don't agree with is the way he makes them, the sometimes confusing and small diagrams, the overuse of quotes and failure to apply in detail to real life situations. It comes closer than most academic work in marketing to reality, but still not close enough to apply easily. Stick to the summary in the first few chapters and just read the ones on influence and beyond.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
HOORAY!! After some 30 years of pleading the case, I've found someone else who agrees that Marketing, PR and Advertising are not separate entities, but parts of a whole and should be treated as such.

It is said that `There's nothing new under the sun'. To an extent this book proves the point in that many of the management issues mentioned were in my personal `Business Bible', Up the Organization: How to Stop the Corporation from Stifling People and Strangling Profits (J-B Warren Bennis Series). Despite his efforts, and those of many writers since the Sixties, the message clearly has not gone home. This book also addresses similar problems, but also brings everything up to date by concentrating on the fast changing world of communication. Sadly, in such a world, even this book is out of date already in some respects although the methods suggested for measuring impact should be compatible with even newer methods of communication as they come along.

In an early chapter Mr. Sheldrake states he is not an academic. From the first half of the book, this is hard to believe, since I found it incredibly hard going, even after having spent many years working in the areas covered in the book. This may be however due to having reached my biblical `sell by date', reading the book through the Christmas Holiday, and, of course, having been only occasionally now flirting in that particular field of endeavour. Certainly much of what Mr. Sheldrake writes about did not exist during my time working full time in marketing, although Alvin Toffler's (also) 1970 offering
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