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Burn Mark by [Powell, Laura]
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Burn Mark Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 52 customer reviews

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Length: 417 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Review

Praise for The Game of Triumphs and The Masters of Misrule:

'Powell has really outdone herself . . . The Master of Misrule is imaginative, intriguing and one of the best reads available today . . . If you are looking to get lost in a book, make sure it's this one' (Hack Writers)

'I suspected from the first book in the series we could soon have a new star of teen fantasy on our hands . . . A great way to close the story, with strong fantasy helped by brilliant characters, pace and plotting' (Bookbag)

'Powell has managed to create a totally unique, original idea that stands out from the rest of the fantasy genre, combining elements of tarot with a dash of the extraordinary . . . A fantastic second instalment, not to be missed' (Chicklish)

Book Description

The Sopranos with witches in the modern East End - a totally original, utterly engaging page-turner from an exciting breakthrough author

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1084 KB
  • Print Length: 417 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens; 1 edition (7 Jun. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007PQOHBA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 52 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #288,125 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Best suited for the mid to eldest end of the young adult market, this is an interesting look at the politics of living as a witch in a near-contemporary world. The world building is impressive but the characters less so, being a little stereotypical, plus the pace can be slow at times and there isn't any levity to help things along. It seems to be the first in a series too so there's much left to be resolved at the end. Overall a decent read but a bit grim.
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Format: Paperback
The world Laura Powell has created is full of gangster style characters, witches and a whole different way of living. The world was quite political with the likes of the Inquisition, who generally rule what witches can and cannot do and that includes the whole burning at the stake thing. While this book is set in a modern world, it does also explain what happened in the past in regards to this and how the Inquisition have tried to make things more humane (if burning anyone can ever be humane).

While I did find this new world really interesting, reading about it was quite hard going. The first section of the book is quite drawn out, explaining who is who and how everything works. Burn Mark had an extremely slow start for me and it was really hard for me to get into the story. It is also told in a third person narrative which I find quite hard to get on with at the best of times. I found myself getting quite confused about who everyone was as the story kept jumping from one person to another in the middle of chapters. However, the idea was still interesting and I liked how witches were underprivileged and of a lower class compared to the Inquisition who are basically witch hunters.

Glory was a hard character to connect with. From the very beginning, it was clear that she wanted power for herself and was quite selfish. At each opportunity that she had, Glory didn't change and I could see that she didn't really want to either. As a witch, I think she should have been more concerned about the bigger picture in regards to witches in general and her covern, rather than what the outcome for her would be.

Lucas on the other hand, I quite liked. To begin with he seems like quite a stuck-up character due to the family that he comes from but that isn't so.
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By Mr. D. L. Rees TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 27 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
On exactly the same day, fifteen year old Glory and Lucas learn they are witches. Good news for brassy, small time crook Glory - a chance to take on the mighty Wednesday Coven and avenge her mother's death. Bad news for Lucas, the family descended from Cromwell's Witchfinder General and continuing that tradition - his being one the last thing it needs.

Set in a modern London where paranoia reigns, there is now a witch hunt indeed. The Inquisition vows to track down every single one and neuter their powers. Witches join covens for their own protection. Tension rises. Cue for atrocities and public burnings. On both sides all is not as it seems, people on high working to secret agendas. In an unlikely alliance, Glory and Lucas seek to discover the truth.

An interesting central theme, but its development too often becomes bogged down in names and explanations, central characters not making the impact they should. That sense of menace needs to be palpable, we caring for those facing such threats.

Details of witch practices add interest. (Lucas seems to learn a lot astonishingly quickly). Somehow, though, Glory and Lucas (perhaps even the writer?) seem overwhelmed by the scale of it all. The novel requires less clutter, greater depth and more drive to make it work.
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By Su TOP 500 REVIEWER on 23 Sept. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is an interesting view of witchcraft in a dystopian London.

Those with witch powers are supposed to register them with the authorities. Add to this atmosphere of "the different" the "inquisition" - an organisation whose goal it is to control those with powers by any means necessary - and you have an interesting story where the tension develops.

As the government stoke the flames of fear and paranoia against the witches the inquisition steps forward as the saviour of the populous and so starts the witch hunts that will end with many people being murdered by being burnt at the stake.

I enjoyed this book, even though at times it seemed to lose its way a little. I did note the author has left things open for a sequel and I would be interested to see how she handles it.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A fairly enjoyable read , good subject matter for me although I agree its probably at the older teen to adult range for reading, I will look forward to the rest of the series
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Format: Hardcover
Firstly, let me just say that Burn Mark by Laura Powell is no light or fluffy read. If its quick reading you're after then this isn't the book for you. But what you do get is such an intricately detailed quasi-London world that is rich in description right down to the English language and slang used by the east end people of London. And it's about modern day Witches, lots of them!

Personally I loved this book. An alternative England, run by Parliament and Ministers with Witchkind Inquisitors and a Directorate to keep the witchy people abiding and on the right side of the law. This is an England where every teenager will dread the day that they may find the Devils Kiss on their body, and feel the witchcraft soaring through their veins. That day their lives will change. That day happened to both Glory and Lucas. Both on each side of the law line. Gloriana, who prefers to be called Glory, comes from a witchkind background with famous Aunts who used their gift for personal gain. She lives in the Cooper Street coven where illegal trafficking rackets are a daily occurrence and every member of her family has a police record. Lucas comes from a long line of Inquisitors. Gentlemen of esteem who hunt out the witches who do wrong and burn them on a balefire. Their punishment after trial, the burning, is available for the world to see as a lesson.

Lucas and Glory are brought together, both flawed by personal tragedy, and form an unlikely union to eek out an undercover plot that's been trying to blame witchkind for terrorism on the London streets. The Inquisitors want to blame the covens and the covens want to blame the Inquisitors.
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