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Bruckner Remembered (Composers Remembered Series) Paperback – 16 Mar 1998

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber (16 Mar. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571170951
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571170951
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 13.6 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,222,644 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Praise for "Bruckner Remembered" "For readers interested in Bruckner or the cultural politics of late nineteenth-century Austria, Bruckner Remembered is delightful and valuable." --Paul Hawkshaw, Yale University School of Music "Intriguing, piquant, compelling, and deeply touching." --"Times Literary Supplement" (UK)

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Bruckner volume in Faber’s series of composers remembered by their friends, family, critics, and contemporaries has been written by that doyen of Bruckner appreciation, Stephen Johnson. Published in 1998, it comprises an introduction and four sections: 1. ‘Vocation’; 2. ‘The Man’; 3. ‘The Musician’; and 4. ‘A Contract with God’. There are twenty plates (all monochrome), mostly of Bruckner himself but also including some of the contributors chosen by Johnson to illustrate the composer’s biography and personality.

In his eleven-page introduction, Johnson discusses the problems of contrasting accounts of events in Bruckner’s life and of his character. He mulls on his choice of sources as well as the problems in translating upper Austrian dialect. And then, before he begins the main courses of his study, Johnson also provides a twelve-page chronology of Bruckner’s life.

As expected, Johnson is good company in sorting out the wheat from the chaff, as Bruckner’s friends, former students, and other commentators frequently give the lie to the ‘Bruckner as simpleton’ caricature that often appears, although the composer’s own religious devotion and piety are never questioned by these contemporaries.

This book is not a polemic, arguing who was right about Bruckner and who was wrong, who was friend and who was foe. Thus, for example, on the disputed cymbal clash and triangle at the climax of the seventh symphony’s adagio, Johnson simply presents the evidence. That is not to say that Johnson does not hint or imply the possibility of mistaken belief or error in respect of what was written by Bruckner’s contemporaries, and there are a number of areas where contradiction would seem to reign.
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Format: Paperback
In the domain of Brucknerian bibliography, there are two mandatory acquisitions: Robert Simpson's survey of the Symphonies (& the String Quintet) and the wonderful tome in question. What with all the eruptions that have occured since 1896, it is possible to bridge the gap that lies between the Great Man and ourselves, the rich mendicants of the Twenty First Century? Has Bruckner been culturally ossified beyond redemption, much like his bust that resides in the Regensburg Valhalla? I do not know. But as the anecdotes unfold, one by one, in this book, we inch ever closer to Anton himself in all of his complexity. The author is to be lauded: his work is completely devoid of egotism and pedantry. It is a model of its kind.

The anecdote (page 28 onwards) re Bruckner, the boys, the diving-pool and the cat-burglar is a Pearl of Great Price.

If Bruckner is a wellspring of meaning in your life, this book demands to be on your shelf, and be well thumbed at that.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9a618618) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x99f96cf0) out of 5 stars Informative and poignant 30 July 2003
By Scoglio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A gem of a book in this wonderful series --- this small volume will surprise you with anecdotes and stories of Bruckner's life --- definitely not the theoretical exercise that is popularly supposed. Interesting in particular is the clash between Bruckner and Brahms --- between the sublime and the merely very good. Highly recommended in place of the overpriced and overinflated academic Bruckner studies which are proliferating.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9a198ccc) out of 5 stars To touch the Hem of his Garment 15 May 2011
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In the domain of Brucknerian bibliography, there are two mandatory acquisitions: Robert Simpson's survey of the Symphonies (& the String Quintet) and the wonderful tome in question. What with all the eruptions that have occured since 1896, it is possible to bridge the gap that lies between the Great Man and ourselves, the rich mendicants of the Twenty First Century? Has Bruckner been culturally ossified beyond redemption, much like his bust that resides in the Regensburg Valhalla? I do not know. But as the anecdotes unfold, one by one, in this book, we inch ever closer to Anton himself in all of his complexity. The author is to be lauded: his work is completely devoid of egotism and pedantry. It is a model of its kind.

The anecdote (page 28 onwards) re Bruckner, the boys, the diving-pool and the cat-burglar is a Pearl of Great Price.

If Bruckner is a wellspring of meaning in your life, this book demands to be on your shelf, and be well thumbed at that.
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