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The Broken Shore by [Temple, Peter]
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The Broken Shore Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews

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Length: 354 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

'If you only read one crime novel this year, read The Broken Shore ... it might just be the great Australian novel, irrespective of genre' Age 'Its hard to know where to start praising this book. Plot, style setting and characters are all startlingly good... The Broken Shore is one of those watershed books that makes you rethink your ideas about reading' Sydney Morning Herald 'Temple's work is spare, deeply ironic; his wit, like the local beer, as cold as a dental anaesthetic' Australian 'It might well be the best crime novel published in this country' Weekend Australian

Sydney Morning Herald

It's hard to know where to start praising this book. Plot, style,
setting and characters are all startlingly good...

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3412 KB
  • Print Length: 354 pages
  • Publisher: riverrun (1 Mar. 2007)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004Y5AV9C
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #23,272 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
You know you've read a good book because it stays with you long after you've read the final page, and the hair on the back of your neck is standing on end. When I closed The Broken Shore, I felt a tingle throughout my body and I knew that I had read possibly one of the best crime books this year. This novel marks Temple out as a truly superb (crime) writer, his skilfull use of language compliments the plotting. He has the unerving ability to create vivid characters and the sense of place within a few sentences similar to Hemmingway. Temple not only explores the themes of justice but also of family. This is crime writing at its best.
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Format: Paperback
I finished reading this book over a week ago but I am still thinking about it, its structure and its language. Broken Shore is not just "a crime novel"; it is a superb novel in its own right. Bit by bit, through the elliptic dialogue and descriptions of Senior Detective Joe Cashin's thought processes we learn about him, his colleagues, racism and the events that have shaped his

life and, almost incidentally (it first appears) an attack on a local,retired businessman.

It is not a long book but it is not a quick read. The dialogue is parred down to the essentials and some passages have to be read more than once to get a full understanding of them. The time spent on the book is well rewarded.

That the ending can (at least in part) be predicted some way off doe not diminish the novel; it reflects (in hindsight) the natural and logical progression of the story
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Packed with earthy, Aussie outback realism this is a fine, if bleak, crime novel on a familiar theme. Cashin is a marvellous and original creation and the book is studded with some terrific dialogue. Perhaps the ending was mildly underwhelming though.
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Format: Paperback
I read Peter Temple's latest book, 'Truth' before I found this book. I became so engaged with the author, I knew I wanted to read all of his books. What I found within 'The Broken Shore' are all the characters that are bound for their own novels.

Joe Cashin is a former homicide detective, still recovering from severe injuries suffered in a botched stake-out. The injuries so severe, he was sent home from Melbourne to Port Monro to run the small police station. Cashin's routine day in this new job was not as simple at it might seem. One of his colleagues was beaten and used as a sex doll by someone who followed her. You need smarts to run a department like this, a feel for the neighborhood. Cashin is a mixture of kindness, a man of few words and prone to outbursts of temper. He has one liners that catch his opponent off guard. He has a sense of humor and be prepared to laugh.

One of the aspects of Temple's writing is that he catches you unaware. We meet Joe Cashin as he is walking his dogs near a creek. The dogs, are two unlikely giant poodles. Poodles, yes, who chase the wildlife and in particular, rabbits. Peter Temple is an exquisite descriptive writer who makes magic with his words. The novel is in fact a blend of crime fiction and a literary wonder. Temple is well known in Australia, where he lives, "The Broken Shore" has already won the Ned Kelly Award for crime fiction.

In Port Monro a wealthy citizen is beaten to death in his home. Three teenage Aborigines, are charged with the crime. It is important to know that prejudice against Aborigines is central to the novel. Cashin is not convinced of their guilt, and he disobeys his superiors and follows leads that point to several of the region's leading citizens.
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Format: Paperback
I found this to be a novel in two very distinct halves.

The first half plods along, heavy on scene-setting and characterisation, the main plot - of a rich white man battered and robbed in his own home, and the subsequent assumptions toward the Aboriginal youths accused of the crime - seemingly forgotten at times. That said, Temple does this extremely well and although I felt a little frustration at the lack of urgency in the investigation, I was never bored. In fact, I really liked Joe Cashin, Temple's protagonist, and found the peripheral characters (if somewhat redundant to the plot) satisfyingly engaging. Perhaps, though, this pace is intentional.

The story is also heavy on politcal wrangling. The police are keen to pin it on the Aboriginal youths when an arrest goes terribly wrong, and the left-wing politicians are adamant the police are racists who don't care about the truth. Therefore, a slow, labouring sense of non-urgency is perhaps the best device. Temple, laden with the cop-with-a-haunted-past cliche, avoids further cliche by not showing Cashin to be holier-than-thou, fighting the Aboriginal cause tooth and nail; he just wants to get on with his life.

It took me three days to read through the first half, and was tempted to give up. However, when Cashin finally gets his backside in gear and begins investigating properly, the story really captivated me. Much darker than I expected, moving at pace, I finished the second half in one sitting. I enjoyed the second half so much I'd recommend it to any fan of crime fiction. Stick it out, it's worth the wait.

Temple creates a very real character in Joe Cashin and sets the reader firmly in the Australian small town, giving even us pommies a superb sense of place. Certainly worth a read, and I'll be checking out Temple's back catalogue shortly.
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