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British National Cinema (National Cinemas) Paperback – 13 Aug 2008

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 2 edition (13 Aug. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415384222
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415384223
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 1.7 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 507,570 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

'An easy overview of British cinematic history.' - CHOICE

From the Back Cover

British National Cinema traces the development of the British film industry, from the Lumiere brothers' first screening in London in 1896 through to the dominance of Hollywood and the severe financial crises which affected production companies such as Goldcrest, Handmade Films and Palace Pictures in the late 1980's and 1990's. Exploring the relationship between British cinema and British society, Sarah Street uses the notions of 'official' and 'unofficial' cinema to demonstrate how British cinema has been both 'respectable' and 'disreputable' according to the prevailing notions of what constitutes 'good cinema'.

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Top Customer Reviews

By DAWP on 11 Nov. 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
GREAT BOOK FOR STUDYING BRITISH CINEMA.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Perfect, thanks a lot!:)
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Amazon.com: 2.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars what's wrong with film studies 13 April 2009
By Bruno - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book has no higher mission than to keep its nose clean: it has no argument, no vision of British cinema, just a lot of fashionable covering-of-bases to protect its vacuity. When it stoops to an actual film, the reading is staggeringly flat. I suppose it is meant to be sold to undergraduates somewhere or other, but need they be treated so demeaningly?
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