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Britannia Mews Hardcover – 1 Jun 1946

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Little Brown & Co (T); First Edition edition (Jun. 1946)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 999741358X
  • ISBN-13: 978-9997413581
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 13.7 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,443,147 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Britannia Mews


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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Started out brilliantly; following stubborn young Adelaide Culver and her elopement with her drawing master to live in the slums of Britannia Mews. The attempts by her well-to-do family to coax her home fail:
'Alice had in fact influenced her - though not in the direction intended. The commiseration in Alice's first manner (which Adelaide had so quickly removed) was a foretaste of the commiseration which lay in wait at Platt's End and Kensington; and sitting there in the beautifully clean tea-room, out of sight and smell of Britannia Mews, Adelaide felt she could more easily bear life with Henry than life in the family bosom...There was also the fact that on imposing on Alice a totally false picture of her marriage, Adelaide had also, for all practical purposes, imposed it on herself.'

After the first section, and its gripping climax, the story introduces new characters, and meanders on up to the Second World War. I found the book became a lot less interesting as it went on.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is a wise comment on love and fortune. The heroine Adelaide is selfwilled and from a priveliged background throws herself into a disastrous marriage - the image of the slum is almost indelible - but Adelaide's steel of character and ingenuity is unbroken. I have two favourite bits - one is a vivid, symbolic account of washing a young girl's hair, and the other is when she has found love again and in her old age has a gentle unspoken bond with the gentleman - a man who she never marries but who always treats her with the utmost courtesy, which kept her from cracking in the dark years. A book to give hope.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9eb5aec4) out of 5 stars 12 reviews
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9f3d02ac) out of 5 stars Very enjoyable novel 24 April 2008
By applespoon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A very enjoyable and pleasant story of Adelaide, who grew up in the late 1800s in a well-off family in a respectable street in London. Nearby was Britannia Mews, where coachmen and other servants lived. Adelaide eloped with a man of whom her family strongly disapproved and lived in Britannia Mews, which had become a slum over the years. Adelaide managed to establish a very satisfactory life for herself away from her family while Britannia Mews climbed back to respectability. The story ends near the end of World War II. I liked this novel a lot.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa09aec34) out of 5 stars 'The Mews was strictly forbidden territory to both the Culver children' 30 Jun. 2013
By sally tarbox - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Started out brilliantly; following stubborn young Adelaide Culver and her elopement with her drawing master to live in the slums of Britannia Mews. The attempts by her well-to-do family to coax her home fail:
'Alice had in fact influenced her - though not in the direction intended. The commiseration in Alice's first manner (which Adelaide had so quickly removed) was a foretaste of the commiseration which lay in wait at Platt's End and Kensington; and sitting there in the beautifully clean tea-room, out of sight and smell of Britannia Mews, Adelaide felt she could more easily bear life with Henry than life in the family bosom...There was also the fact that on imposing on Alice a totally false picture of her marriage, Adelaide had also, for all practical purposes, imposed it on herself.'

After the first section, and its gripping climax, the story introduces new characters, and meanders on up to the Second World War. I found the book became a lot less interesting as it went on.
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
By moderatelymoderate - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I found parts of the book enjoyable. It starts as a cautionary tale of what happens when a young woman has no one to confide in & thinks life will be rosy after she reforms someone. Later it describes how people in the 1920s felt about their parents & Victorian times in general. In some ways it was like the 1960s.

But it started to feel disjointed & miandering at midpoint, when the viewpoint moved on to another character, of a younger generation. We never again saw anything from the view of the original character. And there were a few too many coincidences as well.

But I would say it's worth reading; 3 1/2 stars.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9ef14150) out of 5 stars Delightful 24 Feb. 2013
By Mim - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
What a surprisingly fine novel -- wonderful story, great characterizations, surprising insights -- and really well written. I love all 'English tea room' type books, and this is an extraordinarily fine one of that sort.
HASH(0x9ef140e4) out of 5 stars Forgettable, but has its strong points 9 July 2016
By Ga303 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"Britannia Mews" is entertaining, atmospheric and fairly well written, but it's not the sort of thing that you can expect to stick with you for any length of time. Then again, not all books have to be to be decent reads.

The plot gets a little contrived and predictable -- I never appreciate it much when characters seem to show up exactly in the right place at exactly the right time -- but the descriptions of Britannia Mews as it changes from Jack-the-Ripper-esque scary slum to smart neighborhood are very well done. And despite some of the contrivances of the plot, there's a nice amount of irony.

Not sorry I read it! But probably won't remember it this time next year.
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