Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Fitbit



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 28 December 2016
This book has the capacity to amaze – on two levels. First, at the complexity and elegance of the universe; secondly, at man's confidence over centuries, always thinking that his latest set of theories has given him almost complete understanding of our amazing universe.

New readings and new theories over the last fifty years or so have taken this always changing almost complete understanding beyond the reach of the ordinary man. Here, a valiant attempt is made to simplify matters by using examples of moving trains and bouncing balls, but the basic concepts are difficult. Particularly when there is still so much we don't know, about infinity and relativity, the shape of time and space, the basic components of the universe – and their behaviour.

And of course, all current theories are based on measurements and extrapolations taken over a mere few decades in our one tiny corner of the universe. But that doesn't dent the confidence of the authors, who reckon we have an almost complete understanding of the universe and our place in it. Just like Newton, Galileo, Aristotle and the rest.

If you want to know about strings, waves, particles, black holes and the rest, this will certainly help. Or you could read the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, where the answer to the ultimate question is much more simple – if somewhat enigmatic.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 March 2017
no problems
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 June 2017
Another great read from Hawking. It goes into detail regarding topics, he hasnt mentioned in his book "A brief history of time" and I expect it to be easier for non cosmologists to read.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 April 2015
Instructive and entertaining, even for the layman
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 August 2014
Really worthwhile read - at least twice!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 March 2017
excellent
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 September 2009
Bought this book as I'd always meant to read "A Brief History of Time" but had never gotten round to it. I thought it might have been a really difficult book to understand but it's not, it's written in an easy to understand way with good explanations on what he's talking about - don't get me wrong though, there's still some things that are hard to get your head round.

If you're interested in this sort of stuff or just looking for a good informative read then I'd highly recommend this book, I couldn't put it down and I plan on reading it again at some point!
0Comment| 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 September 2006
The first time I read this book I was left feeling dissapointed. However after re-reading certain sections of the book a few times, the ideas become easier to grasp and really blow your mind when you realise what they mean. Anyone who would like to know what the theory of relatively is, have an idea of the classical views on the universe, or a little about quantum mechanics without studying them in great detail should consider reading this book. It is a very rewarding read.
0Comment| 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 13 September 2007
I don't agree with Ken at all. OK so the book is short, but do all books have to be 500 page blockbusters? It is printed with large print and wide (not double) spacing, making it a joy to read. The 'illustrations' are incredible full colour graphics. The graphic showing the earth spiraling into the sun might, perhaps, have been left out, but most other graphics are far from trivial and really add to the text. For instance, the electron interference graphic/picture will make you think you've been teleported to CERN.

Kemp's review is much fairer. I have a physics degree and read through this book quickly, without having to re-read anything. OK, you might say, you have a physics degree. But I stumble in other 'popular' books - I'm having to reread(even rewrite!) Polkinghorne's 'very short introduction to Quantum Physics' to get anywhere at all!

I would have no hesitation in buying this book as a great Xmas present for a 14 or 70 year old who wanted to know something about physics.
0Comment| 38 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 January 2010
I never tried Hawking's original, so I can't make comparisons....but the general consensus seems to be that it is pretty inpenetrable. I have however read a number of other "popular science" books on the subject of the Quantum world etc. I'm a graduate chemist but most proved rather hard going .. with an over reliance on jargon.
I found this to be by far the most lucid explanation of what are some pretty difficult concepts. I personally found the illustrations to be very helpful. It is not an overly long book (hence not too intimidating) & whilst perhaps not getting in to too much detail, it does seem to cover all the significant issues.
An outstanding book!!
0Comment| 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse