Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Audible Sample
Playing...
Loading...
Paused

A Brief History of the Philosophy of Time Audio Download – Unabridged

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Download, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£0.00
Free with your Audible trial
Free with Audible trial
£0.00
Buy with 1-Click
£12.68

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company


Product details

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this a Christmas present for a good friend who has no formal training on, but has always expressed an interest in, the literary/historical, physical and philosophical aspects of time ...
Having taken a good look before wrapping, I can heartily recommend Bardon's book for relative beginners -- it deals remarkably concisely and clearly with what is undoubtedly a difficult and elusive subject. In my opinion, Robin le Poidevin's "Travels in Four Dimensions" was previously the best introduction available, but although more sophisticated in its treatment of certain aspects, it also lacks some of the historical background and so probably requires more in the way of a philosophical background to be fully accessible.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A fundamental flaw of this, and other, books on time. If time has no causal impact, then what is the agreed starting point for any explanation of it? If time is just a word (i.e. it has no real outcomes, no empirical evidence, to anchor our definitions around) then its meaning is based on our collective usage only (what else?); but no one ever seems to bother looking in the dictionary when writing about time - including in this otherwise interesting book.

If you do, and you break down the many varied uses of the word time you can separate them all into two distinct core meanings:-
1. Time is an abstract referencing framework for calibrating and indexing events (and intervals i.e. change), and
2. Time is also a non-specific collective term (mass noun) which refers to events (i.e. a non-specific collection of events).
So events determine time (events are the underlying fundamental). And that makes time explainable outside of itself – one of these two definitions will always hold – it is very powerful.

And as interval [or period, duration] and persistence can be explained by reference to events (and not to time) that makes time a redundant word.

Too many assertions are made about time by supposedly eminent academics, whilst apparently still in search of its meaning. How does that work? How can they make an assertion about something they’ve either not yet fully defined, or empirically evidenced? [...]
4 Comments 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse