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Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Bridget Jones series Book 3) by [Fielding, Helen]
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Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Bridget Jones series Book 3) Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 3,149 customer reviews

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Product Description


"Bridget's back and it's v.v. good... I laughed, I cried and most of all I loved'" (Daily Mail)

"Sharp and humorous...snappily written, observationally astute...genuinely moving" (New York Times Book Review)

"A fun fast-paces, entertaining ride...I devoured the book in two days" (Cosmopolitan)

"Laugh out loud funny" (Financial Times)

"You'll be left feeling like you've just met up with an old pal you haven't seen for ages – and wish you could have done it sooner." (Closer)

Book Description

A new Bridget Jones novel by Helen Fielding


Shortlisted for the Specsavers National Book Popular Fiction Book of the Year Award

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2781 KB
  • Print Length: 498 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Digital (10 Oct. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00D1VKZ3M
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 3,149 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #597 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I bought this having read the original two books years ago and I enjoyed those thoroughly. The singleton Bridget of the 1990s was a cultural phenomenon many could relate to. However, this third instalment is a huge disappointment and I fear that Helen Fielding may have tarnished Bridget's legacy permanently. I had to force myself to finish it as it was actually a rather unpleasant read.

*This review contains spoilers*

In my opinion Helen Fielding has transformed Bridget from a loveably scatty character into a selfish monster. It made sense that a singleton in her 30s such as Bridget would be wrapped up in her own feelings and goals, because she was a single working woman trying to make her own way in life. However, in 'Mad About The Boy', Bridget is 51 and a widow with two young children. Therefore, you would assume that she would have developed as a character during the 15 fictional years that have passed since the last instalment but for some strange reason, she has not. 51-year-old Bridget does not appear to have developed psychologically in any way since the last book, despite having been through several life-changing experiences. Although the opening section of the book is quite moving, it soon becomes clear that Bridget's general approach to life has remained the same as before, which just doesn't make sense. This in itself makes it extremely difficult to visualise Bridget as being 51 rather than in her mid-thirties.

Helen Fielding has taken Bridget's least attractive traits and exaggerated them to the point where all her former charm has been obliterated. Bridget is completely obsessed with her own needs and desires, primarily the pursuit of men and her physical appearance.
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Format: Hardcover
First things first; I am a man. A not very fabulous man at that.
Feel free to disregard the rest of my review if you wish as clearly I am not Helen Fielding's target market either now or 15 years ago. In my defense, I did read and enjoy Bridget Jones' Diary back in the day. Oh and I have childcare responsibilities so a grown up Bridget should be right up my street.....

ANYWAY. Now you know my credentials or lack there of let's get on with the review:

I agree with every one of the 1 star reviews here, this is a dreadful book. All the points scored against it are easy shots:

The character has not changed in any way in 15 years despite parenthood and two significant bereavements

The tragic events glossed over in the recap are far more interesting then the trivia that makes up the actual plot of the novel, is Helen Fielding scared of depth?

It reads like a synopsis for a movie with Hugh Grant's character shoe horned in purely so the producers of the inevitable film can include his name on the poster

It is not funny - the comedy is horribly contrived and falls flat on it's bottom at every turn

The story is utter trivia - did I mention that already? It bears repeating!

And you will no doubt find your own list of personal pet hates.
Here are mine:

The dismal cultural research (Plants Vs Zombies is not a game in which children use zombies to destroy plants, there are no 'levels' to complete in Minecraft, the last time a child said "Epic Fail" in real life was 2010 and even then they were eternally shunned by their peers for using such dated parlance).

The constant product placement masquerading as authenticity (Apple and Grazia must be delighted among many, many others).
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17 Comments 254 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Kindle Edition
I'm not giving this book one star lightly. Indeed, the writing is at the upper end of chick lit and Bridget is an immensely likeable character despite being completely unchanged by the last 15+ years. If this had been a story about another fifty-something called Jane Smith or if this was the first time I'd read any of the Bridget Jones series I'd be giving it at least two more stars. However it wasn't and it's not.

Here come the spoilers*****
Since we left Bridget to live happily ever after with Mark Darcy they've had a few years of very happy marriage, then she lost her dad to cancer and had two gorgeous children. When her youngest child was three months old Darcy goes and gets himself killed doing noble things for a good cause, leaving her financially secure and never having to work again. Bridget has spent the proceeding four years being sad, getting fat changing nappies and not having sex. And only now does the third instalment dip into Bridget's infamous diary?? Sorry did Fielding feel none of the above would make a good novel? Well perhaps the next year of or so of Bridget's life was going to be totally mind blowing?

Errr no. Bridget is back at square one. Disastrous dates, too many self help books, diets galore, crazy supportive friends and a selection of suitors with the plot throughout the book being which will she end up with. Instead of career drama and office politics we now see Bridget drawn into childcare drama and playground politics and we have the added issues around dating in an Internet age. Daniel Cleaver made up with Mark before his death and is still around to provide amusing cameo appearances, sadly he's not around enough to rescue this poor third instalment.
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