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Breakout Nations: In Pursuit of the Next Economic Miracles Audio CD – Audiobook, 15 Jul 2012

4.1 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

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--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks; Unabridged edition (15 July 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1470826313
  • ISBN-13: 978-1470826314
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 3.8 x 14 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,762,426 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

The head of Morgan Stanley 's emerging markets division conducts a brisk worldwide tour in search of new markets ready for takeoff. No first-book jitters for Sharma, longtime columnist for the likes of Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal. His smooth, almost chummy style suits him ideally for guiding civilians through the sometimes-arcane thicket of the dismal science, looking for those emerging markets likely to disappoint or exceed expectations in the coming years... Confining his predictions to the near future, Sharma refreshingly comes across as that rare thing Harry Truman once sought: a 'one-handed economist' willing to stake his reputation without resort to on the other hand equivocation. For investors looking to place their bets and for general readers looking to understand the global economic landscape in the wake of the Great Recession.

Accessible to newbies and revelatory for veterans, Sharma's observations upend conventional wisdom regarding what it takes to succeed in the relentlessly competitive global marketplace.

[A] country-by-country tour de force of what makes emerging markets tick. He is an excellent writer with a keen eye for detail and a lyrical prose sense... As with Michael Lewis Boomerang on the European crisis, for sheer readability and insight on the various parts of the ongoing emerging drama I daresay you won t find a better choice. --Jon Anderson

Mr. Sharma 's intent is to help you find the best places around the world to invest, emphasizing that it will take some work on your part.

This week 's Book of the Week is, Breakout Nations by Ruchir Sharma, one of the world 's leading emerging market investors. This is the best book on global economic trends I ve read in a while. --Fareed Zakaria, CNN GPS

... it 's refreshing to read Breakout Nations, Ruchir Sharma 's book on the Bric countries Brazil, Russia, India, China and the rest of the developing world... [H]is book offers a careful view that has little truck with forecasts of the relentless Bric-led rise of the emerging world.

The head of Morgan Stanley s emerging markets division conducts a brisk worldwide tour in search of new markets ready for takeoff. No first-book jitters for Sharma, longtime columnist for the likes of Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal. His smooth, almost chummy style suits him ideally for guiding civilians through the sometimes-arcane thicket of the dismal science, looking for those emerging markets likely to disappoint or exceed expectations in the coming years... Confining his predictions to the near future, Sharma refreshingly comes across as that rare thing Harry Truman once sought: a 'one-handed economist' willing to stake his reputation without resort to on the other hand equivocation. For investors looking to place their bets and for general readers looking to understand the global economic landscape in the wake of the Great Recession.

This week s Book of the Week is, Breakout Nations by Ruchir Sharma, one of the world s leading emerging market investors. This is the best book on global economic trends I ve read in a while. --Fareed Zakaria, CNN GPS

Breakout Nations works best as a compilation of highly illuminating country vignettes--similar, say, to Michael Lewis' Boomerang... As with Mr. Lewis' work on the European crisis, for sheer readability and insight on the various parts of the ongoing developing world drama, I dare say you won't find a better choice. --Jonathan Anderson

Mr. Sharma's intent is to help you find the best places around the world to invest, emphasizing that it will take some work on your part.

In Breakout Nations, he takes us on a fascinating gallop through the countries at the edges of the developed world. Not only does he challenge the accepted wisdom--that China and India will motor on, ad infinitum--but he comes up with some surprising candidates for the next decade's economic stars.

... it's refreshing to read Breakout Nations, Ruchir Sharma's book on the Bric countries--Brazil, Russia, India, China--and the rest of the developing world... [H]is book offers a careful view that has little truck with forecasts of the relentless Bric-led rise of the emerging world.

The head of Morgan Stanley's emerging markets division conducts a brisk worldwide tour in search of new markets ready for takeoff. No first-book jitters for Sharma, longtime columnist for the likes of Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal. His smooth, almost chummy style suits him ideally for guiding civilians through the sometimes-arcane thicket of the dismal science, looking for those emerging markets likely to disappoint or exceed expectations in the coming years... Confining his predictions to the near future, Sharma refreshingly comes across as that rare thing Harry Truman once sought: a 'one-handed economist' willing to stake his reputation without resort to "on the other hand" equivocation. For investors looking to place their bets and for general readers looking to understand the global economic landscape in the wake of the Great Recession.

A book that combines keen on-the-ground reporting and economic and investment analysis with lively, lucid prose. "

Breakout Nations is basically an investors lonely planet guide to the world for the new century. "

Mr. Sharma s intent is to help you find the best places around the world to invest, emphasizing that it will take some work on your part. "

At the core of this impressive book is the counter-intuitive argument that the boom of the mid-2000s was a blip in the long historical trend for emerging economies and that the next decade may be one of decelerating. In Sharma s view, the much-hyped decline of the West and emergence of the rest may take a lot longer than optimists would like to believe. "

... it s refreshing to read Breakout Nations, Ruchir Sharma s book on the Bric countries Brazil, Russia, India, China and the rest of the developing world... [H]is book offers a careful view that has little truck with forecasts of the relentless Bric-led rise of the emerging world. "

A primer to guide us... this is a great road-map to the new and better-balanced world in which we will all live, and an encouraging one. "

It is really the focus of economic attention around the world. It is a whole new look at which economies are going to be winners and which are going to be losers. --Prannoy Roy, NDTV"

There is no better book for country-by-country accounts of emerging markets (and riskier ones called frontier markets). Its strong point is the author s reliance on grassroots experience in each country, avoiding statistical charts. "

This is among the best books to understand the emerging world and its positive and negative aspects. Sharma matches the brilliance of Thomas L Friedman, author of the widely cited The World is Flat. " --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Head of emerging markets and global macro at Morgan Stanley Investment Management, Ruchir Sharma is the author of the international bestseller Breakout Nations. He writes frequently for the Wall Street Journal and Foreign Affairs and lives in New York City. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By DAVID BRYSON TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 May 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
One small consolation for the current economic pantaraxia is that many very helpful, intelligible and readable books on economics are being written and, it even appears, read. Whether or not you agree with me that we the democratic public have an outright duty to try to understand the economic issues we are invited to vote on, there is no denying that we are being given the opportunity. Ruchir Sharma comes with impressive credentials as the head of Emerging Market Equities at Morgan Stanley. That makes him knowledgeable, in addition to which he is a practising journalist, most publicly in Newsweek, and that has made his writing a model of clarity. What this book is about is economic growth. It is not about the question whether such growth is a good idea, although I suppose it is assumed to be some kind of good thing for the most part. Spurts of growth funded with easy money are not commended, but Brazilian-style constipation with growth opportunities neglected and postponed gets the thumbs-down as well. Subject to rational limits like these, the nations that Sharma inspects are assessed by their growth potential. Growth is also never asked to justify itself as an alternative to, say, freedom or social justice, and this approach at least makes for simplicity.

This is not to say that Sharma makes the mistake of trying to view economics in isolation from politics. For me, economics is a form of sociology - the study of how people behave en masse in the financial sphere. I can't foist this view on Sharma, but he says nothing that leads me to change it. Indeed, his political attitudes are a breath of fresh air in that stifling miasma of prejudice. You can see what I mean from the economies that get the best ratings from him. South Korea comes off best, and I suppose that is nothing surprising.
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Some useful insights.

However the analysis of the Chinese situation is not accurate and this is the only one I know a little about and wish to comment on. China's government is in the process of continuing reforms. New road and railway construction can continue as there are 160 cities with a population of one million and over. A comparison with Japan 20 years ago is flawed. Contrary to Japan which is shrinking (population -0.2%), China has still many steps to catch up and its population is still growing (+0.5%) without even taking account of the recent two child policy. There is still a huge under consuming class and in the next ten years another 200-250 million will move from the country to the cities. So, yes, China's growth will naturally slow down as it reaches a larger more mature economy but still growing at a considerable pace. Even 6% would be quite remarkable for an economy that has reached that size.

AS for the rest there are too many obsolete analysis that makes it worthy of a journalistic publication but not of a book. China has abandoned the one child policy; Thailand reverted to a well expected military regime; Turkey is becoming an Islamist dictatorship under Erdogan not worthy of the author's indiscriminate praise (no full disclosure here on the author connection with that country) and India so called democracy is limited to elections with rape becoming an ugly habit condoned by too many politicians. All that was certainly not forecast-ed in this book but not even imagined as a possibility that would disrupt its optimistic or pessimistic options.
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Its difficult to exaggerate the quality of this book. Ruchir Sharma searches for the real keys to national development which are often not so obvious or easy to identify.

His whole analysis deals with probabilities rather than the pseudo-scientific laws, formulas and equations that have reduced post-war economics to a turgid mess. If the situation is probabilistic then his "Rules of the Road" are perfect guides to policy, pointing countries in the right direction without claiming to understand exactly how the mechanisms work.

His detailed look at development by country quickly disposes of misleading generalizations like BRICS. For example, India and Brazil prove incapable of building infrastructure (unlike China), guaranteeing growth = inflation in both cases, and Russia has yet to manufacture anything that the world wants to buy.

Equally the book is very revealing of the qualitative differences between successful developing nations.

A good example is the contrast on P.166 between South Korea and Taiwan. He says, "Though South Korean has a significantly larger manufacturing sector than Taiwan, it employs a much smaller factory workforce (about 15% of total labour, compared to 25% in Taiwan). It also has one of the most dense robot populations in the world. That means South Korea is doing a lot more with fewer workers and is much more productive than Taiwan."

Unexpected countries such as Turkey, Sri Lanka and Indonesia are following successful development paths and Sharma is quite happy to evaluate the sociological background to their policies.

In 1948 Sri Lanka received a British ex colonial favoured Tamil immigrant minority elite dominating the Sinhalese majority.
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