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Breaking the Da Vinci Code Paperback – 18 Apr 2006

3.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson Publishers; New edition edition (18 April 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785280146
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785280149
  • Product Dimensions: 13.9 x 1.6 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,512,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Synopsis

Including an appendix that contains Dr Bock's answers to frequently asked questions, this title seeks to distinguish fictitious entertainment from historical elements of the Christian faith. For, by seeing these differences, one can break the Da Vinci code.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I found this book amazing in actually showing what actually occured between Jesus and Mary Magdalene and what the Davinci code is really about. Combining his historical and Biblical knowledge, Bock has written an outstanding book.
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Format: Paperback
"The Da Vinci Code" is fiction and within that fiction, Brown plays with history and his arguments are not dependent on that history being fact. Whether Jesus was married or not misses the point. Whether the Gospels included in The New Testament were due to Constantine or not misses the point. Brown uses speculations and assertions by his characters to loosen the hold that old "facts" may have on us. To highlight issues we may never have recognized. To make us question. The historical record for early Christianity is not as clear or complete as some indicate. Finding the facts may not always be possible: we may have been misled that some could be.

Bock argues that women were well-treated within early Christianity. But even if women were treated okay then, are they treated well now? How many female Popes have we had? Brown was sensitive to woman today; Bock seems content to argue over their status back then. Bock may be correct about early Christianity but he misses the point if he fails to address the concerns of all the women who felt respected by Brown and are disappointed by current treatment of women in many churches. In this book, at least, Bock presents little if anything that speaks to the situation of the many contemporary women who were touched by Brown's story of Mary Magdalene. What Brown lacks in facts, he seems to have more than made up for in heart.

Bock establishes differences between the Literalist and Gnostic view, but he doesn't establish that there is no place for the Gnostic view. He abandons his argument and instead concludes, not with anything the historical record can confirm, but with assertions based on the texts he favors, saying "The tomb had no human remains. Jesus was alive.
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Format: Paperback
"The Da Vinci Code" is fiction and within that fiction, Brown plays with history and his arguments are not dependent on that history being fact. Whether Jesus was married or not misses the point. Whether the Gospels included in The New Testament were due to Constantine or not misses the point. Brown uses speculations and assertions by his characters to loosen the hold that old "facts" may have on us. To highlight issues we may never have recognized. To make us question. The historical record for early Christianity is not as clear or complete as some indicate. Finding the facts may not always be possible: we may have been misled that some could be.

Bock argues that women were well-treated within early Christianity. But even if women were treated okay then, are they treated well now? How many female Popes have we had? Brown was sensitive to woman today; Bock seems content to argue over their status back then. Bock may be correct about early Christianity but he misses the point if he fails to address the concerns of all the women who felt respected by Brown and are disappointed by current treatment of women in many churches. In this book, at least, Bock presents little if anything that speaks to the situation of the many contemporary women who were touched by Brown's story of Mary Magdalene. What Brown lacks in facts, he seems to have more than made up for in heart.

Bock establishes differences between the Literalist and Gnostic view, but he doesn't establish that there is no place for the Gnostic view. He abandons his argument and instead concludes, not with anything the historical record can confirm, but with assertions based on the texts he favors, saying "The tomb had no human remains. Jesus was alive.
Read more ›
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