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Breakfast at Tiffany's (Modern Library) Hardcover – 31 Jan 1994

4.6 out of 5 stars 103 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Inc; New edition edition (31 Jan. 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067960085X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679600855
  • Product Dimensions: 12.5 x 1.6 x 19.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (103 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 413,745 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Truman Capote is the most perfect writer of my generation. He writes the best sentences word for word, rhythm upon rhythm. --Norman Mailer

From the Inside Flap

Contains:
Breakfast at Tiffany's
House of Flowers
A Diamond Guitar
A Christmas Memory

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Although it is the title tale this book is most frequently remembered for, the accompanying short stories should not be overlooked: With a dash of humour and a sprinkling of warmth, this magnificent compilation of four stories was truly a pleasure to read. Breakfast at Tiffany’s, following the mysterious aspiring young actress Holly Golightly, had me hooked from the first few pages not only due to the secrecy regarding her past, but also the way in which there is little or no information offered about the narrator. The reader, experiencing Miss Golightly’s company through the eyes of the storyteller, is unaware of even the simplest facts about the narrator’s own life (to such an extent that we never even learn his name). Such is his obsession with his new friend, that it is as if his own existence becomes unimportant. I believe it is this unusual method of storytelling that is largely responsible for the book’s success.
Another aspect of Truman Capote’s writing I greatly appreciated was his sensitivity and attention to detail: “We giggled, ran, sang along the paths toward the old wooden boathouse, now gone. Leaves floated on the lake; on the shore, a park-man was fanning a bonfire of them, and the smoke, rising like Indian signals, was the only smudge on the quivering air. I thought of the future, and spoke of the past.” It is the relationship between Holly and the narrator that stands out in my mind when remembering the story. Their friendship is touching, and the way in which the narrator longs for Holly is often heart-rending.
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By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 May 2004
Format: Paperback
The well-known short novel, Breakfast at Tiffany's, and three of Truman Capote's most famous short stories make for a continually fresh and exciting look at how human beings successfully connect with one another. No matter how many times you read these stories, you will be moved by Mr. Capote's marvelous sense of and appreciation for the specialness of each life and the ways we belong to each other. Having not read Breakfast at Tiffany's for about 30 years, I came away much more impressed with the novel than I was the last time I read it. Perhaps you will have the same reaction upon rereading it as well. If you are reading it for the first time, you have a very nice surprise ahead of you!
Breakfast at Tiffany's revolves around Holly Golightly, the former starlet and cafe society item, who floats lightly through life (like cotton fibers in the wind) looking for where she belongs. Ms. Golightly is and will remain one of the most original and intriguing characters in American fiction. Like a magician, she is both more and less than she seems. But she has an appreciation for people and animals that goes to the core of her soul that will touch you (if you are like me), especially in her desire that they and she be free.
The novel has a harder edge and is more revealing about human nature than the movie is. Of the two, I suggest you start with the novel and graduate to the movie. You will appreciate the portrayal by Audrey Hepburn of the inner Holly more that way. The same humor is in both the novel and the movie, as well as the innocent look at life for what it can be, believing in the potential of things to work out for the best.
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By A Customer on 9 April 2002
Format: Paperback
I was pleasantly surprised by this book - I vaguely remember seeing the film with Audrey Hepburn but could remember nothing about it at all. The book, however, made much more of an impression. It's an easy read and is entertaining and atmospheric. My guess is it'll stay with you longer than the film will. I thought it would be sugary sweet, a romantic comedy with a happy ending but the characters and relationships are more flawed and interesting than that. An interesting book. Worth a read.
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Format: Paperback
Four beautiful stories relating to innocents and the unfeeling worlds in which they find themselves engulfed, worlds playing to different rules and marching to very different beats. This truly is one of the best collections of short stories I have ever come across, better than anything I have read by Saki or Fitzgerald, both of whom I am fond. Never maudlin or contrived, Capote manages to generate a depth and breadth of emotion I have rarely ever felt, and often in fewer words than one might sensibly imagine possible. The highlights for me are The Diamond Guitar and A Christmas Memory, stories which leave you stunned by their brilliance and literally incapable of conscious thought, so much is there to absorb, for some long time after you've finished reading them. I cannot recommend this highly enough.
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Format: Paperback
Breakfast at Tiffany's takes its cue from Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. Both are short, beautifully written New York novels in which semi-invisible narrators wrestle with more self-indulgent characters, who take centre stage - and with whom the narrators enjoy ambiguous, shifting relationships.

In fact, the narrator in Breakfast at Tiffany's is so invisible he doesn't even have a name - apart from those the central character, Holly Golightly, gives him. The novel is a hymn to Holly - the narrator desperately wants to understand her, just as Nick Carraway struggles to understand Gatsby. Ultimately, though, hero and narrator are too different, with the heroes in both novels behaving exactly as heroes do: bolder, more inventive and almost certainly less stable than their narrators. Also like Gatsby, Holly Golightly has a hell of a backstory, slowly revealed.

Capote's prose is not dissimilar to Scott Fitzgerald's: poetic, but perhaps a little simpler and with a lighter touch, including some wry humour. Attractively written, it's difficult not to be as spellbound as the narrator is by Holly - however maddening she is. A captivating character study with prose like champagne - classy, and with fizz.
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